Tag Archives: World Heritage Site

Creative archaeology – November in CBA North-land

CBA North News

We apologise for the lateness of this issue in reaching you, but hope that the up to the minute information below is some recompense. In answer to our earlier question for a collective noun of Roman conferences we were quite taken for a “Convivium” suggested by Dave Barter, one of our many Twitter Followers.

This time the theme is ‘creation’ with notice of a recent publication, of objects from Neolithic stone axes to Victorian stained glass within the local group lectures, and the creation of our shared archaeological heritage in the construction of Hadrian’s Wall itself, the development of archaeology from antiquarianism (with reference to ‘The Wall’) as well as for a World Heritage Site and its own unique challenges.

We are gathering materials reviewing the year from local groups – if you would like to send in what your group has been up to please do – as well as looking ahead to 2017 (we already have the programmes of three local groups). These emails tend to be the most widely read, and circulated, of the year (420+ that read the email, whilst 300 viewed the website events page one day and the Twitter notice was circulated to over 16000). So it is well worth a quick note to promote your work to us, everyone else of the other local groups and members of no affiliation other than to CBA North as well.

You could be out almost everyday this week at one or other event that we’ve listed for you here!

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
06.11.2016

Northern Archaeology
The Northumberland Archaeological Group (NAG) have recently published a volume of their journal Northern Archaeology in memory of Ian Colquhoun, well-known regionally and internationally as an expert for the Bronze Age, in particular of metalwork and specifically swords.

This contains a range of articles which CBA North Members and followers might be interested in – two cover Bronze Age swords with one written by Ian from his MA thesis on the findspots of Northumbrian Bronze Age swords and one with a member of his lifelong learning group on a single sword from near Durham. An obituary of Ian and bibliography of his publications are also included.
The results of two landscape surveys on the moors of Hexhamshire and near Chatton, and an article on Northumbrian stone circles, complete the volume. This can be bought for £12, whilst back numbers of the journal containing a range of articles – not just on Northumbrian archaeological sites or finds – can also be bought by non-members at a range of prices.

Contact details for NAG, as well as the contents of previous volumes of Northern Archaeology, can be found through these links for their website and Facebook pages.

Events this month
Below the usual listing of all the regular local group lectures still to come this month that we know of. Please let us know an additions to the list to let everyone else know.

7 November – Pagan Viking Burial in Scotland, Dr Colleen Batey [BAS]
9 November – Annual General Meeting and Grimes Graves and the Neolithic Flint Mines of the UK, Pete Topping [NAG]
10 November – Recent excavations at Vindolanda, Marta Alberti [APPLEBY]
12 November – Light without Morris: alternative perspectives on Victorian stained glass, Dr Neil Moat [ARCH & ARCH]
12 November – The Arbeia Society Conference: ‘An Exceptional Construction’: the building of Hadrian’s Wall [ARBEIA]
26 November – Annual Study Day and AGM: The Theban West Bank Tombs: new Research and Directions [NEAES]

The Birley Lectures
The creation of the archaeological past is to be covered in this lecture on Tuesday. All are invited to hear Durham’s own Professor Richard Hingley at this lecture – one of a new series – at Durham.

Durham WHS 30th Events
Also in Durham, though on Wednesday night, is another lecture on the creation of heritage. Like others in the series we’ve publicised earlier in the year this lecture will also cover the challenges – in this case for an area even more remote than the remotest parts of CBA North.
We, of course, cover have two World Heritage Sites – Durham Castle and Cathedral is one, whilst Hadrian’s Wall is part of the Frontiers of the Roman Empire as the other. Might we yet cover a third in the Lake District in 2017?

Durham WHS events this week

Join us in Celebrating Durham World Heritage Site’s 30th Anniversary this November!

“What Makes Durham World Heritage Site Great”– 2nd-30th November, WHS Visitor Centre, an exhibition showcasing the 30th anniversary photo postcard competition winning entries.

Heritage at Risk – A public debate, Friday 4th November, 5pm, Prior’s Hall, Durham Cathedral, with colleagues from across the world. Free event. Booking Required.

Lecture by local historian John Grundy – “Saints and stones: the rich and varied joys of Durham” Saturday 5th November, 7pm in the Cathedral.    £5-00, Booking Required.

Family Fun Day – Sunday 6th November. Join us for family events and activities across the World Heritage Site, including:

  • Stonemason demonstrations in the Visitor Centre
  • “Come and Sing” Scratch choir for 7 to 13 year olds and concert in the Cathedral
  • Tours of Palace Green with our Young Heritage Ambassadors
  • Children’s trails and activities in the Cathedral
  • Children’s activities in Palace Green Library

We still have places for our WHS Anniversary Conference “The Stories Within the Stones – Intangible Heritage” 4th to 5th November.  Booking Required.

BOOKING:
For more information and booking, visit thewebsite at Durham World Heritage Site and click on the orange banner, pop into the WHS Visitor Centre on Owengate or contact Jane Gibson.

Durham World Heritage Site lecture series – 30th Anniversary Celebrations

The next lecture of the Durham World Heritage Site lecture series will be “Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site: 30 Years of Challenges, Responses and Change in a Cultural Landscape” by Sarah Simmonds, who is World Heritage Site Co-ordinator for the Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site. A poster is attached here giving a quick overview of the lecture.

This lecture will be on Monday 21st March, 6pm, in Room PG20 of the Pemberton Building, Palace Green Library, Durham. The lecture is free of charge, but as places are limited, booking is necessary.

Sarah is one of the two coordinators who make up the Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site Coordination Unit. Before working in World Heritage Site management in the UK she worked abroad in development and education as a specialist in capacity building for the UN in East Timor and Afghanistan and before this with VSO in Indonesia. Sarah has worked for almost a decade as a World Heritage Site coordinator developing a special interest in partnership working, participatory management planning, community engagement, landscape scale strategies and planning policy. She has a Masters degree in Cultural Heritage from the Institute of Archaeology at UCL.  Her dissertation focussed on the issues and ethics related to the engagement of international agencies with local cultural projects in Ethiopia. Her most recent challenge has been writing the first joint World Heritage Site Management Plan for Stonehenge and Avebury which was published in 2015.  She has been  a member of the ICOMOS-UK Executive Committee since 2014.

The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception at the World Heritage Site Visitor Centre.

Please reserve your place by writing to the organiser at raffaella.aliprandi@durham.ac.uk or contact the World Heritage Site Visitor Centre using the contact details below. (If possible please would you let me know if you intend to attend the drinks reception too, for catering purposes).

I am looking forward to seeing you at the lecture.

Kind regards,

Raffaella Aliprandi
WHSVC Lecture Series Organiser
Durham World Heritage Site Visitor Centre
7 Owengate
Durham
DH1 3HB
Email: raffaella.aliprandi@durham.ac.uk 
Tel: 0191 334 3805

Durham World Heritage Site Research Strategy Launch Event

The Durham World Heritage Site Research Framework was published January last year.  It aims to promote rigorous, academically informed research to progress our understanding and appreciation of the Cathedral, Castle and their environs.

To view the Strategy click here.

This launch event will provide an opportunity for interested researchers to discuss the priorities for research identified in the Strategy and aims to provide a space for the initial discussions which will lead to future research projects and funding proposals for them.

Please click here to see the programme for a full schedule of the planned activity for the afternoon.

This event will be on Wednesday 24 February 2016 at 1.00pm in the Learning Centre, Palace Green Library, Durham.

If you would like to attend please register your details with Kelly Guy at: admin.imems@durham.ac.uk.

Two UNESCO lectures next week

Next week series a pair of UNESCO lectures are to be held. However both on the same day at the same time but in Durham and Newcastle. Details of both lectures are given below.

Professor Peter Stone, UNESCO Chair in Cultural Property Protection and Peace at Newcastle University

This lecture, Cultural Property in Conflict and Peace, is part of the Newcastle University Insights lecture series. Admission is free with no pre-booking required.

This starts at 17:30 and will be just over an hour. It will be held at the Curtis Auditorium, Herschel Building, Newcastle University. Further details of this lecture can be found here,

Meanwhile;

Professor Robin Coningham, UNESCO Chair in Archaeological Ethics and Practice in Cultural Heritage at Durham University

The lecture, ‘Ships of Gold’: UNESCO, Pilgrimage and Preservation in South Asia, is part of the Durham World Heritage Site lecture series. Admission is free but booking is required for this.

This also starts at 17:30. It will be held at the Palace Green Library Learning Centre. Further details of this lecture can be found here.

Heritage at Risk: the Long Game

Durham World Heritage Site -Architecture and Conservation Series

The next lecture in this series will take place on Wednesday 18th November 2015, at 6.30pm.

Venue: Room PG20 Pemberton Building, Palace Green, Durham

Robin Dower: “Heritage at Risk: the Long Game”

Buildings and Sites are identified as Heritage at Risk because they have been underused and unvalued, perhaps for many years, and their management and maintenance has consequently been neglected. Decay has brought them to a state requiring a significant effort to rescue. This talk will illustrate case studies of Heritage at Risk sites of widely different cultural origins, the aim being to recognise their significance and to understand the causes of decay in order to develop an affordable conservation strategy for each building.

For 40 years Robin Dower has been a partner in a small architectural practice in the North East. He regards himself as a countryman, previously being a member of the Northumberland National Park Committee and Regional Council for Sport and Recreation in the 1970s and the Countryside Commission for England and Wales throughout the 1980s. He has been a member of the Newcastle Diocesan Advisory Committee since 1982 and is Chairman of Durham Cathedral Fabric Advisory Committee and a member of the Cathedral’s Open Treasure Project Board. He talks occasionally of retirement but is not in a hurry to make such a move.

The talk will be followed by a drinks reception in the World Heritage Site Visitor Centre.

To register, contact Raffaella Aliprandi: raffaella.aliprandi@durham.ac.uk

 

 

Research and Rescue Excavations – Exhibition and talk

Recovery and rescue archaeology – Exhibition and Lecture

The current exhibition at the Durham World Heritage Site Visitor Centre is entitled ‘The Nepal Earthquakes: research and rescue excavations at the UNESCO World Heritage properties of Kathmandu’.  The exhibition finishes on the 27th November.

The Visitor Centre team would like to invite you to a lunchtime talk by Dr Mark Manuel, one of the research team on Thursday 19th November at 1.15pm at the Visitor Centre.  Dr Manuel will outline Durham University’s Department of Archaeology and UNESCO Chair activities in Kathmandu since the earthquakes in April and May 2015. There will also be an opportunity to view the exhibition.

If you would like to reserve a space please email or call the Visitor Centre on visitor.centre@durham.ac.uk or 0191 33 43805 (space is limited).  The Visitor Centre is located at 7 Owengate, Durham DH1 3HB