Tag Archives: Vindolanda

CBA North: July edition (Festival of Archaeology and more)

CBA North News

Dear Members and Friends of CBA North,

As we sure you are all well aware and need no reminding these are unprecedented times. International and national events, as well as regional and local ones, have been cancelled and postponed across the CBA North region. We hope that you, yours and your groups all are well, and continue to remain so, as we all are somewhat confined in our actions.

Many practices, procedures and pieces of work have changed and changed again in the current circumstances – several drafts of CBA North email news have been started since the end of March only to be changed and changed again as the situation has changed. Opening hours, hours of work and staff changes, however, have all been thrown into sharp focus for all of us. In a sobering article Marta Alberti of The Vindolanda Trust explains what is happening at Vindolanda in what had been planned as its 50th anniversary year. There are ways that you can help the trust and others again as lockdown arrangements ease.

However other work continues on – just in different forms and often in different locations to normal. The CBA Festival of Archaeology is one such change, with its many digital offerings starting on Saturday for its first appearance this year and details of this are below. Some groups within the CBA North network have started to hold digital lectures, whilst others continue to produce their own normal (and indeed extra) newsletters and emails for members. Quizzes and other digital content has been seen again. Gill Goodfellow of the West Cumbria Archaeology Society has sent an article in linking across to digital content which all can access, whilst CBA National and others have put more (or made more freely available) content online given the general inaccessibility of some libraries and archives.

Some groups are also using the time to plan, as well as revise websites and website pages for the future, for a newer normal. It is heartening to see such activity, productivity and continued interests in archaeology, history and heritage in these unusual times. There is so much digital content online to make choices is invidious, but if something stands out for you or you wish to publicise something please let us know so we all can enjoy it.

CBA North has been full of busy behind the scenes as well – our apologies for not being outwardly busy to you as members. Committee has met twice by email to discuss various matters, new members – including a new group member (TillVAS whose many activities we’ve often publicised in our emails to you) – have joined our number since our last email to you. Queries regarding membership, of and from our previous publications as well as general archaeology been answered for students and home-schoolers. Virtual meetings, updating and work with other regional and national bodies have also been done regarding what happening across the CBA North region with our regional overview.

Please join in us welcoming all our new members. Feel free to circulate this email and its links to non-members, and around your local group’s membership – this can be done through the ‘Forward to a friend’ link in the side bar and/or the website version of this email. Who knows they too may be also interested in joining our number?

Feedback, questions and/or comments most welcome at any time – either direct or through your local group representatives – to us; this is your group after all. A fresh survey, prompted by Covd-19, from CBA National asks what help and support your local groups need. CBA North is also taking stock and considering the future as well for our next five year plan, so we all would be most grateful if you would contribute your thoughts to the survey.

Best wishes – stay safe and well, we’ll be back with some more news soon,

CBA North Committee
10.07.2020

CBA National news
1) Festival of Archaeology 2020

This year’s festival comes in two parts, and the first of those start on Saturday.

Over 100 events and activities over the next 9 days

From 11-19 July 2020, the CBA is trying something new – a digital Festival of Archaeology
 
With live events on hold at the moment, we decided not to cancel our usual summer programme of archaeology events, but instead stage an online festival of interactive talks, competitions, youth activities and other engaging archaeology content.   

We were unsure whether people would be willing to join us in trying something brand new at short notice, but the response has been astonishing. There are now over 100 events listed on the festival website – something for every archaeology lover to enjoy, and lots more for curious minds to discover. 

We would be delighted to see you there. Here are just a few of the highlights:

Launch event – Saturday 11 July

Join the Council for British Archaeology as we launch the 2020 Festival of Archaeology with a day of online activity.

There are four free interactive online sessions – register now! Join Time Team’s Phil Harding as he takes you on a tour of Wessex Archaeology’s environmental laboratory, learn about the domestication of plants, find out how to make amazing 3D models and join our student careers session to discover routes to studying and working in archaeology. 

Alex Langlands: Digitally reconstructing excavations at Old Sarum – 12 July
Frustrated at not being able to get out and excavate this year? So is archaeoogist and TV presenter Alex Langlands. Join Alex as he digitally reconstructs the 1912 and 1913 excavations of Old Sarum’s cathedral site. Register now.

Podcast Sunday Chat – Archaeology and the Climate Change Conundrum – 19 July
Tune in for a chat on the impacts of climate change on archaeology with our hosts Career in Ruins. Guests Caroline Barrie-Smith (CITiZAN), Neil Redfern (CBA), Hannah Fluck (HE) and Rachel Bynoe (University of Southampton) present a fantastic perspective in this discussion on where archaeology stands in the climate change crisis debate. Podcast will appear here.

The campaigns of Septimius Severus in the far north of Britain – 14 July
Dr Simon Elliott, one of the world’s leading experts on the Severan campaigns in modern Scotland looks at the failed campaigns of Septimius Severus in AD 209 and AD 210. Register now.

Bacon Sandwiches and Stonehenge: Connecting Local Youth with Heritage Sites – 16 July
This live discussion will focus on how heritage sites can best support local youth organisations, and examine the ‘Our Stones’ documentary film project led by young people from Durrington Youth at Stonehenge in 2019. Register now.

An Archaeological Safari into No Man’s Sky – 17 July
Find out about the fascinating world of archaeogaming. Join digital archaeologist Dr. Andrew Reinhard (University of York and New York University) on a live-streamed archaeological safari to visit the dusty corners of past human civilizations in video game No Man’s Sky. Watch on Twitch. You can also tour the Mortonia Minecraft server in our other archaeogaming event.

Bristol’s Brilliant Archaeology: Archaeology and the Historic Environment – 13 July
Explore the work of Bristol’s Historic Environment Officer and find out about Know Your Place, an interactive digital mapping resource that lets members of the public explore and contribute to layers of history in counties across South West England. Register now.

This is just a snapshot – there are many more talks and lectures on the festival website!

Have you ever wondered what archaeologists really do?  Do they just dig or are there other aspects to their work?

A Day in Archaeology, delivered in conjunction with the Royal Archaeological Institute, showcases “a day in the life” of archaeologists from all over the UK and this year’s event will be taking place on Monday 13 July 2020. Blog posts are uploaded throughout A Day In Archaeology and stay on the Festival website site all year round to form a developing resource for anyone interested in a career in archaeology or wanting to find out more about the range of opportunities to participate. You even have time to add your own!

The 2020 #AskAnArchaeologist Day will be on Wednesday 15 July 2020 – get your questions ready! #AskAnArchaeologist Day is a chance for people from all over the world to ask archaeologists questions, and an opportunity for archaeologists to share their knowledge. Anyone with access to Twitter can ask a question using the #AskAnArchaeologist hashtag and any archaeologist who has an answer is encouraged to respond. Follow the Ask An Archaeologist Day and CBA Twitter accounts to follow the action.
The Council for British Archaeology will be delivering a series of day long events, including the #YouthTakeover, A Day in ArchaeologyAsk an Archaeologist and our Young Archaeologists’ Day. We will be joined by Professor Carenza Lewis (from Time Team) as part of our ongoing Dig School project, Wessex Archaeology will be delivering our Environmental Archaeology Day with careers advice, skills training and a special YAC 3D handling session. Plus you will have the chance to have your artwork turned into a published comic!

This year we have also joined forces with English Heritage to co-create the youth-focused Festival events, as part of the Shout Out Loud project. They are a major partner in this year’s Digital Festival of Archaeology and will be delivering exciting and creative events for audiences aged 11-25. Shout Out Loud is funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund through its #KicktheDust programme designed to encourage and involve more young people in heritage. Below you can find out more about the project, our partnership and lots of great events aimed at our younger Festival audience.

There’s still time to enter our Festival competitions

Don’t forget to get your entries in for our #RubbishArt and Archaeology Showreel competitions. 

We’ll be sharing a range of entries via our social media channels and there are some great prizes on offer. What are you waiting for – get your entries in now! 

Both of our competitions are open to entrants of all ages. Please make sure you read the terms and conditions before entering, these can be found by following the competition links above.

Festival feedback

We want to know what you think! It’s really important that we give you the opportunity to let us know what you think of the Festival, what you enjoyed the most, what you’d like to see more of and what you think we might be able to do better. This year it’s even more important that we get your opinions as it’s the first time we have hosted a digital Festival. 

You can share your thoughts with us by completing our feedback survey after you have attended an event. 
You can access the survey here.

If you’re an event organiser you can find all of the evaluation information including survey links and some handy guidance notes in the Organiser section of the Festival website.

Support the Festival! 

The CBA is a small charity, reliant on donations and our membership to keep the festival going. We would be delighted if you would support us with a small donation, or even better, consider joining us – you’ll get six issues a year of British Archaeology magazine and access to our full digital archive if you do! Find our how to support us below. Thank you.

Enjoy the Festival! 

We hope you have a fantastic 9 days discovering all the Festival has to offer and we look forward to seeing you at a digital event soon!

The 50th Anniversary of The Vindolanda Trust
Marta Alberti, of The Vindolanda Trust, has written of what is happening at Vindolanda. This well-known Roman site in Northumberland has many national and international connections, as well as the site of many excavations. 2020 is the 50th anniversary of the trust, in what was going to be a year to remember Marta now describes of further happenings as enforced by the changing CV-19 situation. This article was written at the start of lockdown, and like many places there have been changes again since.

Please consider how you can support such appeals and venues if you can, as well as your local groups activities, in the future.

‘On the 1st of April 2020, the Vindolanda Trust celebrated its 50th anniversary. Established in 1970 with the aim to excavate, research and share with the public the Roman remains in its care, the Vindolanda Trust has spent the last 50 years providing opportunities for amateurs and professionals alike to immerse themselves in history and archaeology. Great plans were afoot to celebrate the last 50 years of discoveries, and get ready for the next 50. However, in an unprecedented event, on 20th March 2020 the Vindolanda Trust had to close its doors to both Roman Vindolanda and the Roman Army Museum in response to the fight against COVID-19.

Work continues behind the scenes, to ensure that everyone can virtually enjoy the sites and that the Trust can continue in its mission. For example, new home learning resources have been (and will continue to be) updated on the Trust’s website.  The Trust’s social media presence is stronger than ever, with the Communications’ Manager now living on site, and providing all important gorgeous images. Our new excavation HQ is on site, ready to welcome its first volunteers as soon as it is safe to do so.

But to keep this work going, and to make sure that the Trust are there to welcome you when these testing are times are over, we still need everyone’s help.  ALL the Trust’s operating income comes from admissions to our sites, spend in our shops and cafes and from donations. The majority of that has now stopped: to attempt to compensate for this incredible loss, the Trust have launched a survival appeal, in the form of an unusual, online birthday party. Consider helping by donating the equivalent of a pair of warm socks, or a bunch of flowers, or some fizz.

If you would have visited, please purchase the special edition golden ticket, which celebrates the Trust’s anniversary. This will give you unlimited visiting rights until December 2021!  The Trust, just like the CBA, has long been committed to be at the forefront of research, public engagement and participation in history and archaeology, and looks forward to re-opening its doors to you, and to the world, as soon as possible’.

A West Cumbria Archaeology Society (WCAS) update
Gill Campbell has written an update of a recent Cumbrian activities by the WCAS group. This links into events and projects previously carried out by the group which have featured in our emails to you. She writes;

‘As part of the ongoing Holme Cultram Harbour Lottery Funded project, WCAS organised a weekend of experimental Medieval iron smelting led by Dave Watson from Moor Forge near Wigton. The furnace was built in advance with local clay to give it time to dry out. The charcoal was produced in the Lake District and the iron ore was from Florence Mine, Egremont.

Saturday was a trial run, firing the furnace to make sure all was ok. On Sunday morning Dave lit the furnace and attached a jet of air to bring it up to in excess of 1000°C. Due to a shortage of medieval serfs to pump bellows an adapted vacuum cleaner was used throughout the smelt. Once the furnace was up to temperature it was loaded throughout the day with alternate buckets of charcoal and cups of iron ore – a total of approximately 40 over the duration of the process.

During the day slag was tapped from the bottom to avoid the level getting too high and after 4/5 hours the charcoal level was allowed to drop, the final slag was tapped and the furnace dismantled to reveal the lump of bloom in the bottom. The bloom was removed from the kiln, hammered whilst still malleable to consolidate it and then successfully tested with a magnet to show the iron content.

As a result of the project the Society has a good sized piece of bloom for reference as well as a lot of information about the process which will be very useful as we continue to research the industrial processes that went on in the vicinity of Holme Cultram Abbey. We already have plans drawn up for when we are able to get back in the field!

WCAS would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund for making this experiment possible. Big thanks to Dave Watson for hosting and working so hard to make it successful, Darrell for his advice from the USA as well as Terry, Adam and Pete who helped on the day. For more information about the smelting there is a short YouTube video of the day covering all stages of the project. This can be found here.

CBA National news
2) Recharging British Archaeology: your chance to take part

The CBA has recently secured support from Historic England’s COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund for a project to help rebuild public participation in archaeology as we recover from the effects of the pandemic. Cancelled projects, loss of income, worries about volunteer capacity and the need to plan for different ways of working in future are just some of the problems that groups have faced. There are distinct challenges for those working with children and young people, as well as those with an older membership.


Through this project, the CBA will use its knowledge and skills to support as many organisations as possible to help rebuild public participation in archaeology. We will listen to what organisations need so that we can offer small-scale immediate support and – most importantly –  plan a future programme of activity and funding bids which will enable us to help recharge community archaeology over the coming months and years.

The first step is to start a conversation with local and regional societies and groups, including our YAC branches and member organisations, to find out how you have been affected and what help you would welcome from us.

Please take a few minutes to give us your views by completing our survey here.

There is a separate survey for those involved with YAC Groups here.

Based on these conversations, we will be able to plan some immediate support to help the sector recover. This might include online training, toolkits, mentoring or one-to-one advice sessions. We will finalise the details of this offer based on what you tell us you need.

The insight we gain from these conversations will also enable us to undertake detailed planning work for future CBA projects to extend our Youth Engagement work, develop new forms of volunteering, plan a possible future small grants scheme and improve our digital infrastructure.

At the CBA, we know that we need to change the way we work as an organisation in response to the ongoing crisis. This project will help us ensure that we do this in a way which helps as many organisations as possible offer new and continuing opportunities for people to enjoy archaeology.

CBA North news this week

CBA North News
We’ve a few announcements in this email for you from a variety of sources. Firstly there is a CBA National survey which is anticipated as an up-to-date summary of all local archaeological groups across England and Wales, some further details of the Teesside Archaeological Society, reminders of other events from Appleby to Berwick, via Newcastle and Crookham, this and next month, as well as a note about the forthcoming General Data Protection Regulations.

If you would like to submit anything, or indeed for the next CBA North Committee, please feel free to do so. The contributions and thoughts of all Members and Followers are most welcome at any time.

Much of our admin work behind the scenes over the next few weeks will be preparing things for the General Data Protection Regulations. We will make it as painless and easy for you as possible, but we can’t ignore it as the law.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
27.03.2018

CBA National’s Community Archaeology Survey
CBA North members may remember the work of our former Secretary Suzi Thomas with CBA National back in 2009 and 2010. This provided a baseline of all archaeological groups which was published in 2010. Debbie Frearson, now at CBA National, has written to give us and therefore you details of a fresh survey;

“The Council for British Archaeology (CBA) has launched a survey about archaeology volunteering. We want to find who out takes an active part in community archaeology and what kind of things you get involved with. Most importantly we’d like to know about the kinds of additional support you need to thrive and how the Council for British Archaeology might be able to help you. The last time we asked you about this was 10 years ago and a lot has changed since then! We would appreciate it if you could distribute this email to your members, the survey can be completed by a representative of a group or an individual.

The CBA brings together the interests of a wide range of people and organisations involved with archaeology in the UK. This includes commercial archaeologists, those working in local authorities, museums or other parts of the archaeological heritage sector; universities; community archaeologists and volunteers. We will use the results from the survey, which has been funded by the Headley Trust,  to help shape the work of the CBA over the coming period and better tailor the support we, and others, can offer to community archaeology.

Click here to start the survey https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/CBA_Community_archaeology_2018. The survey closes on Thursday 29 March 2018.

Thank you for your help.

[If you would like a copy of all survey questions so you can discuss and debate your answers between your local group’s committee, please let us know and we’ll see if we can forward one onto you. Since the last survey a number of new local groups have formed, so this survey will be very useful as an up-to-date summary of what is happening and where. Please forward this email or the survey link on to others!].

Tonight’s TAS talk
Teesside Archaeological Society’s monthly talk, tonight, at Stockton is Chris Casswell of DigVentures. He will be talking on a series of excavations across, adjacent and related to sites in CBA North-land. His title is Lindisfarne to Lancaster: Community-based Excavations in the North of England (and a bit of Scotland).

This talk will look at a number of excavations – from a Bronze Age barrow to Medieval village – that have happened, most notably at Lindisfarne, as well as one to come this year in Scotland related to Durham and Lindisfarne. As normal for TAS events this will be at Stockton Library at 7.30.

Other events to come in March and April 2018
As we are in the last week of March and an Easter break close at hand for many here is a quick snapshot of what is happening across CBA North-land from our Events page for the end of March and start of April. Just today we have also have updated this page with all the TAS events planned as well.

28 March – A frontier and community in transition: the Tungrian Vindolanda, Andrew Birley [SOCANTS]

9 April – Durham and the Battle of Dunbar: Identifying Scottish soldiers at Palace Green, Durham, Richard Annis [BAS]
11 April – The Peregrini Project: Excavations on Lindisfarne, Richard Carlton [NAG]
12 April – The Late Iron Age royal site at Stanwick, North Yorkshire: new perspectives, Professor Colin Haselgrove [APPLEBY]

Looking further ahead we also have heard of one group’s 2018 to 2019 programme already!

Further details are through our website pages for the groups, the times and venues of these meetings. We hope you can get along to them!

General Data Protection Regulations
We will shortly be writing to all members about these changes which are very important for how we contact you. This means some changes to our Social Media and Digital Information Policy which was adopted in 2016, which are largely tweaks that Committee are working through.

In the meantime we have some notes from CBA National highlighting what local groups need to do and as a possible template for your group. If there is a demand from our local group members, then we might look to hold a meeting for you on this before the end of May deadline. Let us know if you would be interested in this.

Or if your group ahead of the pack, then let us know so we can highlight your work to others of the CBA North network.

CBA North information for next week – Teesside and Newcastle lectures

Next week sees the start of two regular lecture series by two more local groups.

The 2016 Teesside Archaeological Society’s lectures start on Tuesday, 26th January, at 7.30 in Stockton Central Library, Stockton, with a short AGM to be followed by Lauren Wilkinson (Archaeologist & Site Education Officer) from the Vindolanda Trust give a talk on Vindolanda.

The following day the Anniversary Meeting of The Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne, Wednesday, 27th January, at 6.00 will be at the Mining Institute, Newcastle upon Tyne, and see Matt Perry on “Commemorating the Jarrow Crusade: why the Crusade remains relevant today”.

Contact details for each society can, as ever, be found in Local Societies and Groups page.

Our regular events page now has 54 events for 2016 – though even more details are still to come!

AKE/20.01.2016

Hadrian’s Wall Archaeology Forum 2015

Hadrian’s Wall Archaeology Forum 2015

The Hadrian’s Wall Archaeology Forum is an annual day-conference featuring talks for the general public about new discoveries in the Hadrian’s Wall frontier zone including the Cumbrian coast. This year’s programme features talks on excavation projects at Maryport, Vindolanda, Wallsend, South Shields and Binchester.

This year the event will take place on the 28th November at Queen’s Hall, Hexham, For booking detail see:

http://www.queenshall.co.uk/events/hadrian%E2%80%99s-wall-archaeology-forum-2015

 

Finds from the Roman North and Beyond – Spring 2015 Meeting 16th – 17th March, Newcastle University

Finds from the Roman North and Beyond

Joint Roman Finds Group and Centre for Interdisciplinary Artefact Studies
Spring 2015 Meeting 16th – 17th March
, Newcastle University

The 2015 RFG Spring Meeting is based in Newcastle. It will be a two day conference from lunchtime on the Monday 16th to late afternoon on Tuesday 17th March. It will be held in Rooms 1.04 and 1.06 of the Armstrong Building, University of Newcastle Upon Tyne and is being jointly hosted by RFG and the Centre for Interdisciplinary Artefact Studies of the University (ncl.ac.uk/historical/about/facilities/cias.htm).

There are four sessions of papers, with fourteen illustrated talks, on various aspects of finds from sites throughout the north, and an organised visit to Segedunum Roman Fort, Baths and Museum. This is an excellent opportunity to hear about recent finds and research in the north, as well as to view one of the major museums along Hadrian’s Wall which has undergone major work in the last few years.
Space is limited so early booking is strongly advised. The cost of the meeting is £30 for fully paid up RFG members, £20 for students, £35 non members.

What’s included

  • Access to all conference sessions, finds and poster viewings.
  • Teas and coffees as in the programme.
  • Wine, soft drinks and snacks at the evening reception
  • Finds Viewing/poster displays/book sales

There is space in the Armstrong Building for finds display and discussion—during tea/coffee breaks. There will be recent finds from Vindolanda and South Shields but further displays are welcome—please indicate on the meeting application form. There will also be space for poster displays and the sale of books etc.

Getting to the Armstrong Building

From Newcastle Railway Station a taxi will cost approximately £5. Transportation from and to Newcastle Railway Station is easiest by Metro (to Haymarket Station) or by any bus to Eldon Square. A city centre map showing the University Campus is on the RFG web site. Travelling by car is not encouraged, but the Armstrong Building is opposite the RVI Hospital and the carpark off Claremont Rd usually has spaces and is not too expensive. Trains to Newcastle are, of course very regular (e.g. Monday 09.00 from KX arrives Newcastle 11.51; Tuesday 16.59 Newcastle arrives KX 19.51 – subject to timetable change). Download the Campus Map here.

Joint Roman Finds Group Centre for Interdisciplinary Artefact Studies Meeting Spring 2015

Monday Evening Reception and Conference Dinner

There will be a reception for delegates at 17.30 . Following this, at 19.30, there will be a Conference meal, held in ‘the Ottoman Turkish Restaurant’. This must be pre booked. (details on booking). The menu for Monday evening will be placed here in due course.

Annual General Meeting

There will be a short Annual General Meeting for RFG Members on the Tuesday morning. There are three main items for discussion: an RFG Constitution, Establishment of a RFG Grant Fund and future RFG subscriptions. Details will be circulated to all RFG Members prior to the AGM so that those members not able to be there can still have a say in these matters!

Museum Visit

On the Tuesday afternoon there is an opportunity to visit Segedunum Roman Fort, Baths and Museum (www.twmuseums.org.uk/segedunum-roman-fort.html) including an opportunity to scale (or take the lift!) the viewing platform for an excellent view of the remains of the Roman fort and to watch the time lapse video of the building history of the site. There will then be a guided tour of the full scale reconstructed bath house (current repairs permitting) and Hadrian’s Wall reconstruction. There is an additional charge for this event of £6, which includes transport from the Armstrong Building, return to the railway station and admission to the Museum. There will be an opportunity to purchase a snack lunch at the Museum.

Questions and further Information

Any questions about the meeting should be made to Stephen Greep at sjgreep@gmail.com

Meeting Programme and Timetable

Day One : Monday 16th March 2015

Pre meeting
13.00 Registration. Welcome tea/coffee
13.25 Welcome and Introduction, Dr James Gerrard, Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Newcastle.

Session One : Current Finds Research at The University of Newcastle
Chair : Dr Jane Webster, Senior Lecturer in Historical Archaeology and Head of Archaeology, Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Newcastle.
13.30 Dr James Gerrard, Lecturer in Roman Archaeology, Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Newcastle. ‘Rethinking the Irchester bowl, again’
14.00 Emma Gooch, MA Student, Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Newcastle. ‘A load of old bulls: ‘phallic horns’ in bovine imagery’
14.30 Evan Scherer, PhD Student. Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Newcastle. ‘The Use and Abuse of Late Roman Artefacts in Transylvania’

15.00 Tea/Coffee – viewing of finds and posters.

Session Two : Finds from South Shields
Chair : Dr Mark Jackson, Lecturer in Archaeology, Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Newcastle
15.30 Dr Stephen Greep ‘A very late Roman furniture makers workshop from Arbeia’
16.00 Matt Fittock, PhD Student, University of Reading ‘Pipeclay Figurines from South Shields in their wider setting’
16.30 Alex Croom, Keeper of Archaeology, Tyne and Wear Museums Service ‘Finds from recent Vicus Excavations at Arbeia’
16.50 Keynote Speaker: Lindsey Allason-Jones ‘Working with Roman Finds’

17.30 Wine/soft drink reception (with snacks)
18.00 Close
19.30 Evening dinner at the Ottoman Turkish Restaurant (details on booking)

Day Two : Tuesday 17th March 2015

Session Three : Finds from the North
Chair : Justine Bayley, Chairman, Roman Finds Group
09.00 Dr Philippa Walton, ‘Research Fellow, University of Oxford . ‘Cataloguing and analysis of the Roman ‘votive’ assemblage from Piercebridge, County Durham : An Update.’
09.30 Dr Rob Collins Research Associate on the Frontiers of the Roman Empire Digital Humanities Initiative (FREDHI) at Newcastle University ”Great Whittington: New finds identifying a new site in the Wall corridor’
10.00 Frances McIntosh, Curator of Roman Collections, English Heritage /PhD student, Newcastle University’ ‘Clayton; Collector, Conservator and Curator’
10.30 John Cruse, ‘Independent Researcher and York Archaeological Society Quern Co-ordinator ‘Roman Querns in the North – Some Distinctive Regional Types’

11.00 Annual General Meeting/ Tea/Coffee – viewing of finds for non RFG Members

Session Four. Finds from the North and Beyond
Chair : Sally Worrell, PAS National Finds Adviser, Roman Artefacts, UCL
11.30 Barbara Birley, Assistant Curator, Vindolanda Trust, ‘Recent finds from Vindolanda’
12.00 Jenny Proctor, Post Excavation Manager Pre-construct Archaeology, Recent finds from Be dale, N. Yorks’
12.30 Dr Hella Eckardt, Associate Professor, Department of Archaeology, University of Reading‘ Literacy and power: Bronze inkwells in the Roman Empire?’

13.00 Meeting Close

Session Five : Visit to Segedunum Roman Fort, Baths and Museum
13.15 Transport to Wallsend Museum (lunch available)
14.15 Alex Croom: Introduction to the Wallsend Museum
15.00 Nick Hodgson: The Bath-house and Wall reconstructions
16.00 Transport to Newcastle Railway station will depart from Wallsend (15/20 minute journey— timed to meet the 16.59 departure from Newcastle Central Station)

 

If you require additional information or wish to clarify anything about the meeting please email Stephen at:
sjgreep@gmail.com

 

http://www.romanfinds.org.uk/meetings

Hadrian’s Wall Archaeology Forum 2014

Hadrian’s Wall Archaeology Forum 2014

Saturday November 22nd at The Queens Hall, Hexham.  9.50am – 4.30pm

Reservations & Tickets – Queens Hall box office,  Tel: 01434 652477,  Email:  boxoffice@queenshall.co.uk

Price £12.00 per person REDUCED THIS YEAR FROM £18.00.  Price includes tea/coffee/orange juice and biscuits mid-morning and mid-afternoon.

Vindolanda: An update on the Frontiers in Transition Project

Dr Andrew Birley, Vindolanda Trust.

 The Temples Project, Maryport.

Tony Wilmott, English Heritage.

 The Vicus Project, Maryport

John Zant, Oxford Archaeology North.

 Excavation and survey at Ravenglass fort and vicus.

Kurt Hunter-Mann, York Archaeological Trust

 Binchester excavations, season 6, 2014: revealing the best-preserved Roman building in Britain

Dr David Mason, Durham County Council

 The discovery of the Roman baths at Wallsend and other results from the WallQuest community archaeology project.

Dr Nick Hodgson, Tyne & Wear Archaeology

Vindolanda Workshops

An introduction to archaeological Illustration.

Saturday Feb 22nd and Sunday 23rd 2014 –9.30am–4pm each day. Roman Vindolanda, Hedley Archaeo-Education Centre

This weekend workshop covers aspects and techniques of archaeological illustration under the personal tuition of Mark Hoyle BA(hon);P.G.C.E.;MAAIS; MIfA http://www.markhoyle.com

The course will look at general techniques and methods of accurately recording small finds including pottery illustration, metal objects, bone, and leatherwork. There will be a selection of objects from the excavations at Vindolanda to handle and draw over the duration of the course.

An archaeological drawing starter pack to use and keep will be provided.

Each booking will receive a voucher for a future visit to the award winning Roman Army Museum.

Costs include morning and afternoon refreshments, lunch on Saturday and Sunday. 12 places available: Cost £100 per person.

(A limited amount of well-appointed en-suite single or double B/B accommodation @ £60 per night (double) £50 per night single occupancy is available on site – please contact 01434344277 for details.

Please click here to download a booking form

Coming soon

March

8th Heritage Photography Workshop

15th Roman Jewellery workshop

22nd-23rd Advanced archaeological illustration workshop- Carved and worked Stone

More information and application forms for all workshops, events and lectures will be posted on the Vindolanda website soon http://www.vindolanda.com/news.htm

Vindolanda

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A frontier in transition at Vindolanda by Director of Excavations at Vindolanda,                    Dr Andrew Birley

On the 1st of April in 2013 the Vindolanda Trust started its most ambitious and challenging series of excavations to date, a five year research project under the title of ‘frontiers in transition’. Over the course of its five years, the project will have provided over 2500 opportunities for volunteers to become directly involved in archaeological field work, gaining first-hand experience of the archaeology and history of the world heritage site, as well as places for those who don’t want to directly get their hands dirty in the Northumbrian mud. As the Andrew Birley, the Director of excavations at Vindolanda put it ‘the people who come along and take part on the Vindolanda excavations don’t make up the numbers, they are here to engage with and be an active part of the unfolding story of the history of the site. Frontiers in transition is aimed at unravelling seven centuries of occupation, but more than that, it looks at untangling the potentially disparate experiences of frontier life over such a great amount of time. Vindolanda was not home to one community, it was home to many communities and through this project we aim to let them all have their voice.’

Canadian Field School

The project involves excavations in three areas; the south-eastern quadrant of the last stone fort, deep excavations below the 3rd century vicus and a widening of the exploratory work in the field to the north of the Stanegate road where two new Roman forts have recently been discovered. The first of which may pre-date all of the other Roman remains at Vindolanda.

After the first successful year in 2013, which focused on the post-Roman and late Roman remains within the last stone forts, 2014 will widen out to look at all three areas, starting from the 7th of April and running five days a week until the 20th of September. As usual, the www.Vindolanda.com website opened up on the 1st of November this year to take bookings for the excavations in 2014, and 500 places were fully booked in under 20 minutes. This shows both the popularity of Vindolanda but also the great enthusiasm that remains for people to actively take part and become involved in field work on the northern frontier of Roman Britain. Of course, not everyone is able to excavate, or indeed wants to excavate, and as a response the Vindolanda Trust is widening its access through a series of excellent post-excavation courses and training, from archaeological illustration to photography and Roman cookery. This gives people the chance to engage with the work in many different ways and to get the benefit of the research that is taking place at Vindolanda.

For more information about the most recent Vindolanda research project and a complete list of archaeological related courses being run at Vindolanda next year check out the www.vindolanda.com website for regular updates.