Tag Archives: Vikings

Exploring Northumbria: Trip to Holy Island/Lindisfarne

We’ve just had notice of this trip that is organised by Newcastle University on Saturday. If you aren’t going to any of the many other events that we’ve recently carried notice of – in Cumbria, Lancaster, Lindisfarne (in a different guise) or Durham in previous emails to our Members and Followers – this might appeal to you. If you would like to go, please contact Dr Phillippo direct for further details through her contacts details here as soon as possible.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 02.03.2017

Dear everyone,

   Our next trip in our ‘Exploring classical and historical Northumbria’ series is this coming *Saturday* (note different day to usual), 4th March, to Holy Island and Lindisfarne Priory, one of Northumbria’s highlights. 

*Saturday* 4th March: Holy Island and Lindisfarne Priory (all day)
Start: c. 8.30.  Return by 7.35 p.m.
Cost: £9.70 for all-day NE Explorer ticket, plus any refreshments; entry to sites free.

•       From early Saxon times, the cradle of Northumbrian and British Christianity, and at the heart of Northumbria’s ‘Golden Age’; the celebrated Lindisfarne gospels were created here;
•       Stories of saints, kings and saintly kings, including mobile heads and a friendly raven; and decidedly unsaintly (and unfriendly) Vikings…
•       A tidal causeway, evocative priory ruins, and some of the best coastal scenery in England; also (from outside!) Elizabethan castle (with guest appearances in films such as ‘The Scarlet Pimpernel’…!)

For, with the flow and ebb, its style
Varies from continent to isle;         
Dry-shod, o’er sands, twice every day,
The pilgrims to the shrine find way;  
Twice every day, the waves efface  
Of staves and sandalled feet the trace.  
[…]       
Higher and higher rose to view
The castle with its battled walls.
The ancient monastery’s halls,
A solemn, huge, and dark red pile,  
Placed on the margin of the isle.  (Sir Walter Scott, *Marmion*)

Schedule: 
Meet at Haymarket bus station (outside M&S) stand Q, *no later* than 8.30 and preferably by at least 8.25 (bus leaves 8.33).
Change at Beal road end for Holy Island bus, arrive 11.05.
Explore priory ruins and museum (entry free under educational arrangement with English Heritage); also St Mary’s parish church, parts of which date back to the time of St. Aidan in the 7th C.
c. 1 p.m.: lunch in one of the local cafés (or bring your own packed lunch!)
c. 1.45: walk across the island for coastal views and a look at the Elizabethan Lindisfarne Castle (exterior only, sadly, as NT have closed it for refurbishment; still an impressive sight).
3.45 p.m.: catch bus back to Beal (safely ahead of the tide which cuts the island off twice daily!)
4-5.30: time for refreshments/food in Lindisfarne Inn before catching 17.33 bus to Newcstle (free tea/coffee refills on production of bus ticket!).
Arrive Newcastle 19.36.

*Bring warm clothing and robust footwear*: the island can be breezy even in fine weather; walking is mainly on well-marked paths but you may want to explore the shoreline and will need appropriate shoes or boots for that!

As always, you are very welcome just to turn up on the day, but it is useful to have some idea of numbers in advance so drop me an e-mail if you are interested in coming. Friends from outside the School are also welcome!

My mobile contact no. on the day: 07833 125747.  Let me know a contact number if you plan to use your own transport.
With all best wishes,
  (Dr) S. Phillippo

Viking stones missing from Darlington church

The attention of all CBA North Members is drawn to this recent press release by Durham Constabulary that was issued this afternoon. If you can help in any way please see the contact details at the end of this message;

POLICE are investigating the possible theft of three nationally-important early Medieval sculptured stones from the remains of a church on the outskirts of Darlington.

All Saints Church in Sockburn, which is to the south of Neasham and near the border with North Yorkshire is a national monument and a rare surviving example of a pre- and post-Norman Conquest church site and graveyard.

It contains a rare collection of late 9th and 10th century Viking sculptured stone, unrivalled in the country.

The church discovered the loss of the items last week and notified police, but it’s thought they could have gone missing at any point since September 2015.

The three items missing are;
• a well-preserved fragment of a carved bear’s head, possibly from a hogback –  a Viking grave marker – dating to the 9th or 10th centuries which measures 24.5cm at its widest;
• a fragment of Viking runic inscription which translated means “in memory of Mael-Muriel/…raised cross”, also dating to the same period,  21cm x 18cm x 9.5cm
• and a fragment of a Medieval cross slab carved with a small sword, measuring 43cm x 13cm.

The officer in the case, PC Simon Hopper said; “These items have significant historical value and might have been taken by someone with a genuine passion in this field who thought they could be better preserved elsewhere.

“It could also be the case they have been removed by someone who thought they would look nice in their garden and did not realise their value. But of course there is also the obvious possibility they have been stolen for potential monetary gain.”

Carol Pyrah, Planning Director for Historic England in the North East said: “We are extremely concerned about the loss of these early Medieval stones not only because they are works of art in their own right but also because of their contribution to the significance of this nationally-important archaeological site.

“We will continue to work with the owner and the police to raise awareness of their loss and hopefully to expedite their recovery.”

A spokesperson for the Diocese of Durham said; “The removal of these important artefacts is of great concern. We would ask anyone who has any information that would lead to their safe return to come forward and contact the police as soon as possible.

“Many of our churches both open and closed, as in this case have items of historical importance and making them available to our communities is clearly part of our open door policy. However, that is no excuse for the wanton removal of any items as this is a crime which affects the whole community.”

The collection of stones was catalogued in 1905 and then again in 1984 when they were added to the ‘Corpus of Anglo Saxon Sculpture’.

Anyone with information on the missing artefacts is urged to call police on 101 or to contact the independent charity, Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.

Creating Places of Commemoration in Viking Age Scandinavia

On Thursday afternoon there is an archaeology seminar that might be of interest to CBA North members. This, like the Roman Archaeology Seminar Series, will be held in the Department of Archaeology, Newcastle University, in the Armstrong Building.

Unlike the Roman Seminar this will be held in Room 2.16 on Thursday at 1600 when Julie Lund of the University of Oslo will talk on Relating to Pasts and Creating Places of Commemoration in Viking Age Scandinavia.

Everyone is invited to attend if you so wish, with the location of the seminar indicated, as before, from this webpage.

The Vikings are coming!

This week the Vikings are coming to the CBA North region!

There are two events on Vikings this week across the CBA North region.

On Wednesday our group member the Till Valley Archaeological Society (TillVAS) will be hearing Kristian Pedersen speak on “Vikings in the North Atlantic” at Crookham Village Hall in Northumberland.

On the following day there is a Newcastle University Archaeology Department Seminar when Julie Lund will be speak on “Relating to Pasts and Creating Places of Commemoration in Viking Age Scandinavia” in the Armstrong Building of Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne. Further details of that will follow this post in a minute or two.

In the meantime the Northumberland Archaeological Group (NAG) – the newest group member of CBA North – will be also having their March lecture on Wednesday night as well. This will be on something totally different to the Vikings when Marco Romeo Pitone will be talking about “Experimental Archaeometallurgy in Early-Middle Bronze Age Cyprus” in their lecture at the Newcastle Arts Centre, on Westgate Road, Newcastle upon Tyne.

Over to you to take your choice,

AKE/29.02.2016

Border Archaeological Society lectures

The 2016 lectures of the Border Archaeological Society can be found in our regular Events page. They begin for 2016 on Monday next week, 1 February, at the Berwick Parish Centre (opposite Berwick Barracks) at 7.30pm in Berwick. They are also listed for you below as well;

1 February – Antiquarian rubbings to Wemyss Caves 4D: 50 years of documentation of the Pictish carvings in the Wemyss Caves, Fife, Joanna Hambly
7 March – Early Bronze Age Burial Practices in NE England and SE Scotland, Dr Chris Fowler
4 April – An engraved landscape: rock carvings from the ‘Central Sahara’, Dr Tertia Barnett
9 May – The Economy of the Roman Empire: dynamic or stagnant?, Jeremy Paterson
6 June – Young Archaeologists: Newcastle University’s work with the next generation, Dr Jane Webster
5 September – Mortuary Archaeology, Dr Myra Giesen
3 October – [Title to be confirmed], Prof Caroline Wilkinson
7 November – Pagan Viking Burial in Scotland, Dr Colleen Batey
5 December – Mesolithic of Western Scotland and the Mesolithic/Neolithic of SE Europe, Prof Clive Bonsall

Contact details for the group, including their website, can be found in our Local Societies and Groups page.

Early Medieval Europe Debates

Early Medieval Europe Debates is a new interdisciplinary initiative by the Departments of Archaeology and History at Durham University. All are welcome to attend EMED events. Seminars take place in the Department of Archaeology on the Science Site at 17.15 pm in room D210 (not D217) in the Dawson Building. Forthcoming seminars include:

Judith Jesch, University of Nottingham
Vikings beyond boundaries: migration and diaspora in the Viking Age and after
Thursday, 21st January

Orla Murphy, University College Cork
Early Medieval Textual Transmissions: Visual Media and the Movement of Ideas
Thursday, 18th February

Chris Scull, University College London/ University of Cardiff
Recent discoveries at Rendlesham: the archaeology and contexts of a 7th-century East Anglian royal settlement
Thursday, 10th March

E M E D is a new joint initiative by Helen Foxhall Forbes (History) and Sarah Semple (Archaeology). For further information contact the Seminar Assistant Tristan Lake (Tristan.Lake@Durham.ac.uk).

Seminars will take place in the Department of Archaeology on the Science Site in room D210 (not D217) and will be followed by drinks and usually by dinner with the speaker. If you wish to come for dinner please contact Tristan on the Tuesday before the seminar at the latest.

[Please see the attached EMED, 21.01.2016 poster for the details of previous seminars in this series].

Festival of Archaeology: Viking life and times at Lindsfarne Priory

Viking life and times at Lindsfarne Priory

Sat 18th Jul 2015 10:00-16:00 — Mon 20th Jul 2015 10:00-16:00

Visit Lindisfarne to hear about the intense stories of panic and commotion of the Viking raids on the north-east coast of England. Watch the hardships of Vikings as they re-enact the combat training campaigns!

Consult the website for further details, including entry costs:

www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/whats-on/viking-life–times-Lind-18-07-2015/