Tag Archives: TillVAS

From Ancient Egypt to local ancient environments

CBA North News
This week has been full of busy – in attending the CIfA Conference, in further preparations for our own meetings and taking in details of other events happening in April and May. We will report back upon those events that we can. Archaeology without borders was one of the CIfA conference themes. In the same vein we alert you to events covering the ground between Ancient Egypt and more local ancient environments to the north today to two weeks in times. We work from the south to north, from ancient times to more recent, as well as drier to wetter sites, in the notices for three events in this email.

We will also be reporting of our own event next weekend through emails, and also discussing that, at our AGM. The details for the latter day in May will be sent out later this week. It is hoped that as many of our members and group members can attend these events as possible – we are the regional group for archaeological groups and individuals. Though across the North and with many interests, groups and sectors across the archaeological and historical world and ourselves, we are all interested in the past.

We have no borders in what we do for you!

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 22.04.2017

Today’s Arch & Arch lecture – Ancient Egypt
Today is a joint lecture of our group member the ‘Arch & Arch’ to hear of on-going PhD research. This is at the usual time and place – Room 140 Elvet Riverside, Durham University, Durham – that the Arch & Arch lectures are held.

However today the subject matter is at more of a distance to our local area. In a joint lecture with the North East Ancient Egypt Society, James Taylor will be talking on ‘Desert wastes, pagan temples and the Nile valley; locating monasteries in Coptic Egypt’.

Next week’s lecture – 18 DLI
Also in Egypt, but during World War One, were many soldiers from across the CBA North region. Next week The Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne’s lecture deals some of those soldiers. This lecture will be given by Alistair Fraser on the 18th Battalion Durham Light Infantry. His title is ‘A Battalion on the Learning Curve; 18 DLI in training and in war’.

This lecture will be at the Mining Institute on 26 April at 6 p.m. Further details on The Society can be found online through our website.

The Battalion was garrisoned at Suez guarding the vital canal, so somewhat wetter than the desert alone, and also on the Western Front with the horrific and well-known wetness of that environment.

The next TillVAS lecture – Ancient local environments
Still progressing further north, wetter and more locally, bringing the story up to date, the following – in the first week of May – is next TillVAS lecture.

This lecture will deal with many local wetland environments and what can be gained from their study. Details for TillVAS can also be found through our website pages.

It will also, no doubt, highlight how fluid and changeable the environment has been – not just from pollen cores, but also sediments and volcanic ash. Yesterday, as much reported in today’s papers was the first day that the National Grid did not use any coal, though changes to other sources of power. It seems quite apposite that we send you something on environments on World Earth Day.

Spring starts with a bang(le)?

CBA North News
It has been a while since our last email to you with details of our own event, but CBA North Committee have been busy behind the scenes on your behalf across, and beyond, the CBA North region. Today we start April with a similar spread announcing events this month across the region, as well as giving an update for those yet to book their place at our own CBA North event. Spring starting with a bang includes bangles as per that below.
File:Roman glass vessel (FindID 486174).jpg
The Portable Antiquities Scheme/The Trustees of the British Museum [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)]After the Conference/Workshop later this month, our next event will be our AGM on Saturday, 20th May, which is also in Newcastle this year. We have a range of speakers confirmed, and still to confirm, as well as the business of the day where we’ll note some of the activities that Committee been doing for you and your local groups. Further information will be sent out regarding the AGM closer to the date – we notice many AGMs this month in our events listing below, but all are crucial to the running of groups.

If you would like to contribute any material, particular of things past you think newsworthy, please talk to a CBA North Committee member when they are out and about – we try and get out to all our local group members at some point in time throughout the year – or feel free to email us at any time.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 02.04.2017

CBA North’s Own Event

Our last email gave you all the details for our own CBA North event on Saturday, 29th April 2017. There is still some time to book a place for you or others of your local group. Our previous post was to CBA North’s Members and Followers only, but we are keen that others should come along as well.

People do not have to be CBA National or CBA North members in order to attend.

There are short and long links that you can circulate around your group if you are having difficulties forwarding the email and sharing the blog post onwards, as well as the Forward to a Friend link in this email itself. Behind the scenes we have also changed over our website to open with details for the conference as well and this page also now, includes a Word downloadable form as well which can be found here.

The deadline for booking places remains Friday, 14th April 2017. We will send out an acknowledgement to all those who have booked places during the weekend after that date.

Other April Events
Also behind the scenes we’ve revised and updated our Events page on the website – this includes some changes for April events, as well as additions further ahead from September to November. This month’s list is below for you, for the others you’ll have to see our Events page.

3 April – AGM and Iron Age and Roman period glass bangles, Tatiana Ivleva [BAS]
5 April – Rethinking henge monuments of the British Isles: what can we say about this ‘type’ of site?, Lucy Cummings [NAG]
5 April – AGM and Excavations in Northumberland in 2016, Richard Carlton [TILLVAS] 
7 April – Bog Bodies, Prof. Miranda Aldhouse-Green [WCAS]
10 April – AGM and roundup of projects over the last 12 months [LUNESDALE]
13 April – The Cumwhitton Viking Burials: Part 2 – Interpretation, Adam Parsons [APPLEBY]
18 April – To Be Confirmed [TAS]
20 April – Prehistoric Flint Mines, Pete Topping [CCA]
22 April – Desert wastes, pagan temples and the Nile Valley: locating monasteries in Coptic Egypt, James Taylor [ARCH & ARCH, NEAES]
26 April – A battalion on the learning curve; 18 DLI in training and in war, Alistair Fraser [SOCANTS]

To save overloading you with information, we’ve the posters for the two events in north Northumberland this week below. Further information will hopefully be with you this time next week.

Starting or Ending the Year with a Bang(le)?
This lecture follows the BAS AGM at Berwick tomorrow night. Glass bangles are familiar finds across CBA North’s region and have been studied since the 1930s, but little studied in depth outside of the region. This talk will illustrate what can be gleaned from the larger geographical study of one object type. 

Excavations in Northumberland
Also paired with an AGM is this TillVAS lecture on Wednesday night. This lecture will be looking more at a range of sites and their excavation.

Further events around the CBA North region next week

CBA North News

Events continue at speed all across the CBA North region. Tonight sees the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle’s lecture on Medieval manuscripts whilst you’ll need to be quick to book by the end of this week for the Lancaster University Archaeology Forum for the first March weekend if your interests are more in the northwest of our extensive region.

We, like those manuscripts, also aim to illuminate you. In our case of what is happening across the North coming up soon. Next week, also coming at speed, covers the end of February and start of March means events of the Teesside Archaeological Society at the start of the week, the Till Valley Archaeological Society mid-week and also of the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland in the weekend as well as the Forum just mentioned.

We have details of each and all below for you to take your pick in attending. Enjoy!

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 22.02.2017

Lancaster University 44th Annual Archaeology Forum
This year’s conference includes a number of talks that may be of interest to CBA North members interested in Cumbrian archaeology. These span the archaeological periods of Roman and Medieval on particular sites across Cumbria (Maryport’s temples and Furness Abbey, in further sites in the Duddon Valley and on an early archaeologist of the Urswick area) as well as talks on drones, LIDAR and the Portable Antiquities Scheme in long-standing projects spanning the CBA North and North West regions.

You will need to be quick to book. Details of the day, including further talks, can be found online here with links to the booking system and a map for the venue itself.

Dance of Death
The mystery of our earlier email ‘The Varied Landscapes Of The CBA North Region (And Beyond)’ sent to you on the 12 February is now explained by our group member the Teesside Archaeological Society as explained by David Errickson their Chair. The next lecture, as usual the last Tuesday of the month – the 28 February – at Stockton Library at 7.30 pm, is Death and Discovery.

This lecture will be by David Dance, now a freelance archaeologist, who will discuss the use of archaeology in forensic investigation, exploring the origins of forensic archaeology and its application in criminal investigations of missing or suspected dead persons, with a practical demonstration of forensic archaeology in action.

Further details of the group, and of the speaker, can be found online through the links of their website, accessible through our own webpage in our Local Societies and Groups entry.

The next TillVAS lecture
Later that week is the next TillVAS lecture. With thanks to Maureen Charlton, their Secretary, details are given in their poster below.

Whilst Coldingham might be outside the already large CBA North region there are many Early Medieval and Medieval connections of the various religious houses here to those within CBA North which this lecture might well cover.

(If one looks at the past then suggestions have been made to include the south of Scotland with the north of England at times – not just in the 1470s, but also in the 1970s a suggestion was made to increase the CBA North region!).

Architectural and Archaeological Society lecture
Our email of the 12 February included notice of an open day in Yorkshire following investigations of a Roman road linking with our region. Belinda Burke, Secretary of the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland, another of our group members, sends us details of their next lecture which looks at another site connected by a Roman road – this time Dere Street – to our region.

Clashing dates and Future CBA North events
The 4 March, as we have covered today and in previous emails to you, will be a busy day – the Peregrini (covered in the 12 February email) and Lancaster University Conferences at opposite sides and ends of the region, in addition to the lecture immediately above, as well as CBA North Committee meeting in the morning. It is one of those days with lots clashing!

The agenda for the CBA North Committee will be finalising details for our own events with the dates we have already sent you as 29 April and 20 May – hopefully no clashes for those with anyone else, but if you don’t tell us we don’t necessarily know.

Save those dates if you can!

An A, B and C of archaeology across CBA North

CBA North News

Another month comes, as does another CBA North email. This time round we have another range from across the CBA North region of what is happening and has happened. We take our prompts today from our own initials with announcements for a coffee morning (complete with archaeological display) and a report on the Coniston Copper project for the ‘C’s, an announcement for an Alpine axeheads lecture as well as a note from the Arbeia Society for the ‘A’s.

Where the ‘B’ you might well ask? That is the behind the scenes ‘busy’ that Committee are in preparing such emails, as well as our own events in April and May, for you. We hope that you will also be busy in attending these events of your own and other local groups. Hopefully the next CBA North email will be out to you by this time next week with some further news.

Nonetheless our best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 06.02.2017

TillVAS Coffee Morning
[The weekend coming up has two events; this is the first of the two posters for you – Ed].

The Coniston Copper Project: Penny Rigg
[Members will recall that we put out a call for volunteers for this project during the summer of last year. This article, contributed by Penny Middleton of Northern Archaeological Associates, details the work carried out so far, Ed.]

“In August 2016 local volunteers from the Lake District National Park, working together with specialists from Northern Archaeological Associates (NAA), undertook a survey of the remains of Penny Rigg copper mill, near Coniston (NGR NY 30656 00695). The mill is prime example of a single-phase, medium-sized, ore dressing and processing plant, associated with Tilberthwaite copper mine. The project was funded by the HLF as part of the Coniston Copper Project; a two-year programme administered by the Lake District National Park Authority (LDNPA), which aims to engage the local people in the history and conservation of the areas’ nationally important mining heritage.


The view across the site
 
Tilberthwaite copper mine was first worked under the auspices of the Mines Royal, during the in the Elizabethan period but mined only sporadically after this until taken over by John Barratt, former manager at the nearby Coniston copper mine, in the mid-19th century. Barratt drove a new adit – Horse Crag Level – 1,039 yard (950m) from Penny Rigg to Tilberthwaite to intersect the valuable North Vein. This was intended to improve both transportation and drainage to the mine, and was anticipated to take seven years at a cost of £3,000. However, from the outset the venture was beset with problems, eventually taking 10 years to complete at an undisclosed cost considerably which was significantly over the original initial estimate.
 
Ore from the mine was loaded onto wagons and brought through Horse Level to Penny Rigg, where Barratt and his partners invested in the construction of a new copper mill. Here the ore was sorted, crushed and processed before being sent for smelting. Work on the mill is believed to have begun in 1864 and completed by 1867-68 but it did not remain in operation long, closing soon after the sale of the mine in 1875. The mill later re-opened briefly in the early 1890s, but closed again in 1892, after which the plant was dismantled and the wheel sold for scrap.


The remains of the crushing mill 

Today, the 1.5ha site comprises the semi-ruinous remains a number of buildings – the crusher house and dressing mill, smithy and powder house – as well as various terraces, two settling ponds, leats, holding pond, spoil tips and tracks, all of which are overlain in part by later quarry waste. The entrance to the Horse Crag Level remains visible and the tunnel has recently been cleared by the Cumbria Amenity Trust Mining History Society (CATMHS), although it is unsafe to access without appropriate equipment and supervision. To the north of the site are the expansive remains of Penny Rigg (Horse Crag) quarry, worked commercially since the mid-18th century.


Rectified photographic survey using a total station

The aim of the community survey was twofold. Firstly, to engage local volunteers in the history and conservation of the site through providing practical, hands-on training, and secondly, to prepare a detailed analytical survey (Historic England Level 2/3) of the surface earthworks and structures. The latter was required to inform a subsequent phase of building conservation. A comprehensive record of the complex was made comprising a topographic, earthwork and building survey. The focus was on ensuring the volunteers received a firm grounding in traditional survey skills – plane table, tape and offset – which could be easily transferred to other mining sites in the area. The use of aerial drones, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), reflectorless total station theodolites (REDM), and rectified photography were also demonstrated.
 
A full copy of the report can be downloaded for free from the NAA website, or contact Penny Middleton at pm@naaheritage.com. If you interested in taking part in the Coniston Copper Project then please contact Eleanor Kingston at Eleanor.Kingston@lakedistrict.gov.uk or check the project website at http://www.lakedistrict.gov.uk/learning/archaeologyhistory/coniston-copper for details. Further survey work is planned for March at the site of Low Mill Bonsor for three weeks.


Plane table surveying 1

NAA would like to thank all the volunteers who took part for their enthusiasm and dedication throughout the three-week project. We are also indebted to CBA North and the Archaeological and Architectural Society of Durham and Northumberland for the loan of the plane table, and to Warren Allison and his colleagues at CATMHS for their knowledge, advice and support”.


Plane table survey 2

Local group round-up: The Arbeia Society
Paul Bidwell has sent us this small snippet on The Arbeia Society whose annual conference we publicised last year;

“The Society, apart from its re-enactment group, confines itself at present to arranging the annual conference and its publications, including the Arbeia Journal, but a range of new activities are being planned”.

[We look forward to hearing of those events, Ed.]

Alpine axeheads announcement
[As the second announcement for the weekend coming, here is the poster for the next lecture of our group member the ‘Arch & Arch’. This lecture covers these axes which have been found across Britain and Europe, but will also note their comparative rarity and the science that allows the axes to be traced to source, Ed.].

Other Events This Week
Other events this week also include;

6 February – Celts, Fraser Hunter [BAS]
8 February – Excavations at Hepden Burn and Kyloe Shin, John Nolan and Richard Carlton [CCA]
8 February – Prehistoric Life and Death at Lochinver, Philippa Cockburn [NAG]
9 February – The Prehistoric Origins of the A1(M), Dr Blaise Vyner [APPLEBY]
10 February – The Clayton Archaeological Collection, Frances McIntosh [WCAS]
13 February – The Neolithic in the North-West: What makes this region different?, Gill Hey [LUNESDALE]

Contact details for each of these local societies and groups can be found through our own website pages if you have any questions regarding their times and venues.

CBA North Update

CBA North News

January has been and is going (if not gone) in a flash!

A quick reminder that tonight is the first meeting of the Teesside Archaeological Society for 2017 (on a Newcastle site) and the following day sees another by the Till Valley Archaeological Society (on Roman Binchester). We have continued to update our CBA North website pages with events from the Northumberland Archaeological Group, one of our group members, and hope to have emails out to you in February to bring you further news soon.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 31.01.2017

Events listed on the CBA North website
Details of the next three Northumberland Archaeological Group [NAG] lectures have now been added to our Events page. Though January is almost over these additions take the list up to 65 and more events, including our own, are promised to come.

Please let us know any questions, comments or information that you have by emailing cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org.

CBA North news – the archaeological year is not yet out!

CBA North News

Our latest installment once again spans the variety of the CBA North region and of what various groups are up to across the region. We look at what has happened this year with the Dig Appleby project of the Appleby Archaeology Group, happening the now with events this week of the Teesside Archaeological Society and others, as well as announcing events that will be happening in December further north in Sunderland and yet further north again in lectures of the Border Archaeological Society and Till Valley Archaeological Society in the following week as well.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
29.11.2016

Local group round-up; DigAppleby 2016!
[We hope this is the first update from the local groups across our region describing their activities in 2016. As Members will recall we were given a foretaste of the project in our AGM; here you can find out what happened, Ed.]

DigAppleby got off to a splendid start on 8th July when around 30 volunteers signed up for duty at the Launch Meeting in the Market Hall’s Supper Room. Since then, many more people have come forward to offer their gardens for “archaeological investigation” or to enroll on our various training events.

We chose the allotment area behind St Anne’s Almshouses for our first foray. This is a large, open, grassed area that had the advantage that we could spread ourselves about without bothering anybody. Moreover it was thought that, given the nature of its historical use, there was a good chance that deeply-buried medieval remains might remain undisturbed.

The first weekend saw volunteers producing detailed geophysical and topographic surveys of the site. We used both earth resistivity and magnetometry surveying equipment. This sounds rather technical but was actually very easy to operate and, once the results had been fed into Martin Railton’s computer, our first peek into Appleby’s past was quickly revealed.

After due consideration of the results, two test-pit sites were selected and a second weekend session was scheduled. There was no shortage of volunteers and, further encouraged by some excellent weather (the Almshouses really are a delightful place to work) the pits were duly dug and our first finds began to appear. The first pit revealed a crude cobbled surface, identical to one found previously at the top of Boroughgate and which we believe to be medieval in date. Fragments of pottery were recovered including some medieval pottery, and later wares, also some hand-made nails, some animal bone and glass. In the second test pit we found a deep deposit of rubble. Associated finds indicated this was 19th century and we believe that this is probably the demolished remains of a buildings shown in this location on the 1861 Ordnance Survey map. This confirmed the results of the geophysical survey, which indicated the presence of a high-resistance area.

More test pit excavations were planned for our “Big Dig weekend” between Friday end of 16th and Sunday 18th September. See applebyarchaeology.org.uk/digapplebyblog for details of these.

Elsewhere, and specially tailored for armchair archaeologists, we held a training session to provide an introduction to the arcane art of medieval document transcription. This proved so popular that we had to schedule a second session. The documents proved to be remarkably tricky to decipher and some of us came away with severe headaches and a renewed interest in the delights of using trowels. But it was all very interesting and gave a surprising insight into the medieval mind.

There’s still a long way to go, of course, before we get anywhere near the objectives we have set for DigAppleby, but we feel we have made a jolly good start!

Martin Joyce
Appleby Archaeology Group

[The first Appleby Archaeology Group event of 2017 will give a progress report on these investigations as well in talks by a number of contributors].

Teesside Archaeological Society events
This week sees a pair of events with the Teesside Archaeological Society across the Pennines from Appleby. A bigger piece of archaeological work is reviewed tonight with the last of the society’s own lectures on the excavations associated with the current A1 upgrading between Leeming and Barton by Helen Maclean of AECOM at Stockton Central Library, Stockton, at 7.30 p.m. to which everyone is welcome.

On Thursday there is a second chance to attend the First World War Building Recording Project of the society which we have covered earlier. This workshop will train you in how to undertake building recording, research methodologies, and identify First World War built structures. This knowledge can then be utilized in your involvement undertaking of building recording within the area. The information obtained in this process, will be published and made publicly available to people around the world for a better understanding of these important structures.

As before this will be at Sir William Gray House at Hartlepool; no previous experience is required. This free workshop will take place on Thursday 1st December. If you would like a form, or to book a place, please contact the Teesside Archaeological Society through the links of our website.

The Frank Elgee Memorial Lecture 2016
Also on Teesside this week also sees the Frank Elgee Memorial Lecture in Middlesbrough on Saturday morning. This annual memorial lecture is named after Frank Elgee who was a noted assistant curator and curator of the Dorman Museum, Middlesbrough, between 1904 and 1932 and author of many articles and books concentrating on the Teesside and North Yorkshire Moors covering the archaeology, folklore, geology as well as the flora and fauna of the area. Further details on Elgee can be found at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Elgee.

Sunderland’s Forgotten Stones
Whilst some events look back to what has happened in 2016, some events look forward to events and projects happening in the future. One of these meetings is detailed below to which all interested in the project are invited to attend by Denny Wilson below for us.

There is to be a public meeting for this project with the archaeologists at the Billy Hardy Centre, Castletown, SR5 3EQ, 7pm on Wednesday, December the 7th.

The local volunteer group Castletown Neighbourhood Action Group (CNAG) based in Sunderland, have been awarded £93,900 by the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) for this project.

In a specification written up by Tyne and Wear County Archaeologist and professionally supervised by accredited archaeologists local volunteers and schools, supported by Sunderland City Council, will investigate several interlinked sites around the city to try and identify the origin of an ancient stone structure that once spanned the River Wear between North and South Hylton.

For centuries historians have long debated the origins of this mysterious stone structure but a definitive answer has yet to be found to various questions;

– Was it a bridge, dam, causeway or weir?
– Why was it built?
– When was it built?
– Who would have had the motive, wealth, manpower and skills to construct such a massive piece of civil engineering?

This project will bring together many people of different ages, backgrounds and abilities to try and find the answer. To kick-start the project there is to be a public meeting with archaeologists from Wardell Armstrong at the Billy Hardy Centre, Castletown, 7pm, on Wednesday 7th December.

The archaeologists will give an outline of the project and anyone interested in being involved is invited to attend. Feel free to circulate and let’s look forward to a productive and enjoyable experience!

Regards
Denny

December Events
Meanwhile the north of CBA North’s region is not to be outdone either. Next week there are a pair of lectures at Berwick and Crookham with the Border Archaeological Society and Till Valley Archaeological Society respectively.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Putting flesh on the bare bones of history

CBA North News

Another month has all too quickly passed by, but all that means is another month of lectures and events to look forward to as well. This email is something of a bumper issue of notices for forthcoming events – kicking off on the 3rd with others again in the forthcoming weeks. Once again these are spread across the region, and a bit further beyond, dealing with subjects and locations familiar as well as distant in time and space.

As of yesterday’s Committee meeting it was thought that if anyone, or any local groups, would like to report their own news or announce their forthcoming events to a wider audience across the whole of the CBA North region, please send us such information and material (ideally with a picture or two).

We already have notices of other further events in October, as well as two events – outside of the usual society regular events – for November (which we will aim to send out later this month).

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
02.10.2016

Depicting the Dead
Lectures put flesh on the bare bones of history – and this one of BAS does more than most.

Dr Eilidh Ferguson studied Forensic Anthropology at the University of Dundee before a PhD in juvenile facial identification. She is currently working as a postdoctoral research assistant studying adult facial identification from photographic images and is a Royal Anthropological Institute certified forensic anthropologist involved in forensic casework both in the UK and abroad.

The region is very familiar with anatomical and osteoarchaeological research as the illustration from William Greenwell’s British Barrows shows.

Death on the Nile
Death is also the subject of the North East Ancient Egypt Society’s mini-study in Durham next Saturday, 8 October, as well. In this case a series of three speakers will be dealing with coffin types and decoration. See the NEAES website for more details. This is free to members, but for non-members this will be £5.

Bosworth 1485
The full reconstruction of an archaeological battlefield may, however, be a little way off yet. However the rediscovery of one – Bosworth in Leicestershire – itself is the subject of the next Till Valley Archaeological Society lecture next weekend.

IA Rhouses

The work in relocating this battlefield, previously thought known, is very like TillVAS’s own involvement in the Flodden500 project. Details for booking a place at this lecture are given above, but visitors are welcome to any of the other TillVAS regular lectures to December that are already listed in our Events website page.

Resuming regular local society lectures
Hard on the heels of these events the lectures of the Northumberland Archaeological Group (NAG) resume in Newcastle on the 12th October when Rob Young will talk on ‘Excavations at Derwentcote: a Study in Nineteenth Century Workers’ Housing’, whilst the first of the Appleby Archaeology Group when other local fieldwork ‘Mapping the Medieval landscape of Cumbria’ by Dr Caron Newman will be the following day in Appleby.

The further events of these both these groups – in the case of the Appleby Archaeology Group up to April 2017 – can also be found in our Events (‘https://cbanorth.wordpress.com/events/‘) page of the website.

October 2016’s calendar of regular society events
3 October – Depicting the Dead: an insight into craniofacial analysis for forensic identification and archaeological investigation, Dr Eilidh Ferguson [BAS]
8 October – Death on the Nile: Uncovering Lives and the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt [NEAES]
9 October – Bosworth 1485, Dr Glenn Foard [TILLVAS]
13 October – Mapping the Medieval Landscape of Cumbria, Dr Caron Newman [APPLEBY]
16 October – David Dippie Dixon Memorial Lectures: William Boyd and Controversy as well as Neanderthal Hunting and animal avoidance strategies, Professor Mark White [CCA]
19 October – The archaeology of St John Lateran and the transformation of Rome from Septimius Severus to Constantine, Professor Ian Haynes [ARCH & ARCH]
25 October – Children of the Revolution, Dr Becky Gowland [TAS]
26 October – Kirkharle, Rothley and Alnwick: the three Northumberland landscapes of Capability Brown, Nick Owen [SOCANTS]

Details as to times and venues for all these events can be found in our Local Societies and Groups page of the website.