Tag Archives: Thorton le Street

Talk: How Many Roads Lead to Aldborough ? (Roman Roads)- 7/3/2015

How Many Roads Lead to Aldborough ?

Mike Turpin will give the seventh in a series of talks on The Roman Roads of North Yorkshire at Thornton le Street Village Hall between Thirsk and Northallerton on Saturday 7th March 2015 at 2.00 pm. Admission will be £2 at the door, but prior booking is advised. This programme is designed to both report on recent archaeological activity and to encourage future research within a professional framework.

Mike is an amateur community archaeologist who has spent the last three years carrying out research into the antiquarian history relating to the Roman town of Isurium Brigantum, known today as Aldborough, just east of Boroughbridge. As part of this research Mike has become involved with the work of Mike Haken of the Roman Antiquities Section of the Yorkshire Archaeological Society who gave the first of the Roman Roads of North Yorkshire talks. Mike also takes a keen interest in field archaeology, particularly the implementation of various survey technologies.

Aldborough played a particularly significant role within the Roman occupation of Britain becoming one of the relatively few towns given the status of Civitas Capital, an administrative centre for the largest tribal area in Britain occupied by the tribes collectively known as the Brigantes. It is still not fully understood when and why this settlement was given high status by the Romans, but Mike will argue that its location and choice as Civitas Capital must in part depend on the communication infra-structure both before and after the Romans moved into Northern Britain post A.D. 69.

Mike will consider how Isurium Brigantum may have fitted into the wider network of road and river transportation. This raises many questions which Mike will continue to address in the coming months. He will include in his talk some of the archaeological evidence obtained over the last 250 years of antiquarian investigation and more recent research including reference to the work currently being undertaken by Professor Martin Millett of Cambridge University at Roman Aldborough, as well as introducing some of what can currently be seen by visitors to this important site.

Bookings can be made with John Sheehan: 01609 771878 or by email jgsheehan@btinternet.com from whom further information can be obtained.

 

The recent archaeology of Dere Street and its environs- Saturday 7th February

The recent archaeology of Dere Street and its environs

 Dr Stephen Sherlock will give the sixth in a series of talks on The Roman Roads of North Yorkshire at Thornton le Street Village Hall between Thirsk and Northallerton on Saturday 7th February 2015 at 2.00 pm. Admission will be £2 at the door, but prior booking is advised. This programme is designed to both report on recent activity and to encourage future research within a professional framework.

 Stephen is a distinguished locally based Archaeologist, Fellow of both the Society of Antiquaries and the Society of Antiquities (Scotland), who has undertaken a series of major excavations across North Yorkshire and the Tees Valley. Whilst working for Cleveland County Council in the 1980s he directed the excavation of the region’s largest Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Norton on Tees and assisted in other major excavations including those at Eston Nab hillfort and the Iron Age settlement at Thorpe Thewles. Since then Stephen has undertaken and published on a wide rage of commercial projects. He has recently led important fieldwork projects around Loftus at Street House and elsewhere in East Cleveland examining Late Prehistoric to Early Medieval sites – two volumes of the results are published as Tees Archaeology monographs.

 He has been employed since 2009 as Clerk of Works on the A1 road improvements between Dishforth and Scotch Corner in North Yorkshire. This role involves assessing the scope of works required in advance of the road construction and liaising between the archaeological contractors and Carillion-Morgan Sindall who are building the road on behalf of the Highways Agency. He will report on the on-going programme of archaeological excavation undertaken by the Northern Archaeological Associates, including further evidence of Dere Street and associated fortifications and settlements along its route.

Bookings can be made with John Sheehan: 01609 771878 or email  jgsheehan@btinternet.com, from whom further information can be obtained. 

Talk: The Roman Roads of North Yorkshire :The enigmatic Tees Crossing- 13/12/14

The Roman Roads of North Yorkshire :The enigmatic Tees Crossing

John Brown, an Independent Researcher and Field Archaeologist, will give the fourth of a series of talks on The Roman Roads of North Yorkshire at Thornton le Street Village Hall between Thirsk and Northallerton on Saturday 13th December 2014 at 2.00 pm. Admission will be £2 at the door. This programme is designed to both report on recent activity and to encourage future research within a professional framework.

John is Manager of the Mid-Tees Research Project which was founded with the purpose of locating and investigating Roman and early medieval archaeology in the Tees Valley.. The present focus is a multi-period site covering an area of approximately 1 square km at Sockburn on the River Tees, which is the postulated Tees crossing of Cades Road (Marjary 80a), and has been known as a crossing point of the Tees from early times.

Cade’s Road is named after John Cade of Durham, an 18th-century antiquarian who in 1785 proposed its existence and possible course from the Humber Estuary northwards to the River Tyne, a distance of about 100 miles (160 km). Although evidence exists for such a road on some parts of the proposed route, particularly through North Yorkshire, there is still some doubt regarding its exact course and where it crossed the Tees. The road’s Roman name is unknown, although Cade referred to it as a continuation of Rycknild Street..

The road began at Brough-on-Humber where there was a ferry, a Roman fort and civilian settlement (Petuaria) alongside a major Celtic settlement. It is suggested that it ran northwards through Thorpe le Street and Market Weighton, before gradually turning westwards (possibly following the line of another Roman road) until it reached York (Eboracum). From York it continued northwards to Thornton-le-Street and on to cross the River Tees. It is then assumed to pass through Sadberge and east of Durham City on its way to the Tyne.

An alternative crossing has been suggested between Middleton St George and Middleton One Row, where it is suggested that ‘Pounteys Lane’ is named after a Roman bridge (Bridge of Tees). Indeed bridge remains, and Roman artefacts, have been found there in recent times. This accords with the generally accepted course of the road through North Yorkshire which requires a crossing at this point. John will illustrate his work at Sockburn and his claim that the current evidence shows this crossing to be the more likely.

Further details can be obtained from John Sheehan: Telephone 01609 771878 or email jgsheehan@btinternet.com

 

The Roman Roads of North Yorkshire: The Greta Bridge Crossing- 8/11/2014

The Roman Roads of North Yorkshire:  The Greta Bridge Crossing

Dr David Mason will give the third of a series of talks on The Roman Roads of North Yorkshire at Thornton le Street Village Hall between Thirsk and Northallerton on Saturday 8th November 2014 at 2.00 pm. Admission will be £2 at the door, but prior booking is required. This programme is designed to both report on recent activity and to encourage future research within a professional framework.

David is Principal Archaeologist at Durham County Council, Editor of the journal of the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland and an Honorary Research Fellow at Durham University. He has followed a distinguished career in the public and private sectors and since taking up the position at Durham has supervised ground breaking work at Binchester, Piercebridge and Greta Bridge, each located on important Roman routes.

He will report on his recent work at Greta Bridge where earthworks remain of the Roman fort, which was occupied from the mid second century to the late fourth century. Along with the Roman fort situated a few miles to the west at Bowes, it guarded the cross Pennine road, now known as the M66 (Margary 82). David will place his recent work in the context of this route, and its associated fortifications, which links Scotch Corner to the Stainmore Pass.

Bookings to be made with John Sheehan: Telephone 01609 771878 or email jgsheehan@btinternet.com from whom further information can be obtained.

 

 

 

 

Historic Mapping Workshop – Saturday, 15th November

The Study of Historic Maps: A Workshop

The third in a series of workshops on archaeological techniques will take place at Thornton le Street Village Hall near Thirsk on Saturday, 15th November between 10.00 am and 3.00 pm

Outline of the Day

History and Development of Mapping

An introduction to the reasons for and processes of map making over the centuries (and millennia) and how these have resulted in the different kinds of mapping available to historians and archaeologists today.

Types of Historic Mapping

An exploration of the most common (and some uncommon) types of historic mapping that you might expect to consult during the courses of historic research.

Where to find Historic Mapping

An overview of the physical and digital locations where mapping can be obtained for historic and archaeological research.

Map Regression

A practical exercise in techniques of manual historic map regression using a series of maps of different ages and forms. This session will also look at inferring the presence of archaeological features from historic mapping.

Digital Mapping: an Overview

An introduction, in lecture form, to the ways in which digital approaches to historic mapping are currently being used. This will include an overview of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software and how this is increasingly being used to drive map-based historic research.

About Solstice Heritage

The workshop is being run by Jim Brightman of Solstice Heritage. Jim is an independent archaeologist and heritage consultant based in the local area who has spent a substantial amount of his career to date helping to set up and run community and volunteer archaeology projects. Following a degree and research-based Masters investigating the Roman frontier of northern Britain, Jim spent 8 years working on a variety of projects in the Peak District and southern Pennines before relocating to his childhood home near Catterick in mid-2012, aiming to help set up projects looking into the archaeology of the fascinating, yet understudied, Vale of Mowbray.

Booking

Prior booking is required. The fee for the workshop is £20. There will be a lunch break between 12.00 and 1.00 pm, but lunch is not provided. Cheques in favour of Solstice Heritage to be forwarded to John Sheehan, 4 Arden Mews, Northallerton DL6 1 EN. There will be an additional charge of £2 on the day to cover accommodation and refreshment costs. For further information please contact John Sheehan on 01609 771878 or by email: jgsheehan@btinternet.com

 

English Heritage Thornton le Street Workshop and Lecture – 11/10/2014

Workshop: Lidar Technology –  A new archaeological resource

English Heritage will give the second of a series of workshops on archaeological techniques at Thornton le Street Village Hall between Thirsk and Northallerton on Saturday 11th October from 9.00 am to 1.00 pm. The series is intended to stimulate research into the archaeology of the county and provide researchers with the skills necessary to work in a professional manner. The workshop will be conducted by Matthew Oakey, Senior Investigator, and Dave Knight, Investigator, of the Aerial Investigation and Mapping Section based at York.

LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) was originally conceived in the 1960’s for submarine detection, but it is now used extensively for archaeological survey. It involves remote sensing by aerial surveillance using laser beams which can quickly and accurately record the ground surface in 3D. In some circumstances it can even identify features obscured by ground cover. It has been used extensively by the Environment Agency for land surveying associated with flood risk alleviation schemes and this material is now readily available to the general public. These schemes have generated a considerable archive of the county, especially of lowland areas, but coverage is by no means complete.

This technique has been used as a standard tool for mapping and recording archaeological landscapes by English Heritage for a number of years and the instructors have considerable experience in this field. Its use, alongside other sources of data such as aerial photographs, has greatly enhanced understanding of certain landscapes. The workshop will aim to equip participants with a basic knowledge of the technique including its benefits and limitations sufficient to conduct their own research.

The workshop will be a mix of theory and practice. Numbers will be limited so places must be booked in advance for each workshop along with payment at £20 per person. Payment should be in favour of English Heritage and posted to John Sheehan at 4 Arden Mews, Northallerton, North Yorkshire DL6 1EN. Lunch is not provided. An additional charge of £2 will be made on the day to cover accommodation and refreshment costs. Enquiries to John Sheehan by telephone 01609 771878, or email jgsheehan@btinternet.com

Lecture: The Roman Roads of North Yorkshire – From Warburton to LIDAR

Hugh Toller will give the second of a series of talks on The Roman Roads of North Yorkshire at Thornton le Street Village Hall between Thirsk and Northallerton on Saturday 11th October at 2.00 pm. Admission will be £2 at the door. This series is intended to stimulate research into the routes of Roman roads in the county and ensure that it is adequately recorded.

The speaker has a BA in Roman Archaeology from the Institute of Archaeology, London University, and is an experienced Field Archaeologist currently undertaking independent research into the routes of Roman roads, particularly in upland areas. He has specialised in the archaeology of Roman roads over the past thirty years, during which time he has made extensive use of antiquarian records of Roman roads and sites. He recently co-authored a report on an update of the known remains of Roman roads in Wales for the Welsh Royal Commission. And he is currently working on Yorkshire sites with the Roman Antiquities Section of the Yorkshire Archaeological Society using LIDAR technology.

LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) was originally conceived in the 1960’s for submarine detection, but it is now used extensively for archaeological survey. It involves remote sensing by aerial surveillance using laser beams which are able to penetrate ground cover and reveal hidden landscape features. It has been used extensively by the Environment Agency for land surveying associated with flood risk alleviation schemes and this material is now readily available to the general public. Hugh has used the technique successfully in recent years to identify the course of Roman roads and he will describe his recent work in the county, in particular at Ainley Top near Harrogate and from Bainbridge in the direction of Barnard Castle.

John Warburton was a distinguished mapmaker of national renown during the first half of the 18C. His map of Yorkshire was published by subscription in 1720 after exhaustive field work. For the first time in the history of mapmaking roads were shown in great detail. He was an avid student of Roman Military History and identified Roman roads on his maps, although in these cases his approach was stylistic, rather than strictly accurate. He shows a Roman road between Thornton le Street and Catterick Bridge, but to date no evidence of this has been found on the ground. Although born in Bury, Lancashire, Warburton would know the local area well as he was an exciseman and then supervisor at Bedale in 1718-19, before being appointed to the office of Somerset Herald at the College of Arms in London. Hugh will describe Warburton’s achievements and their importance today in the interpretation of the routes of Roman roads.

Further details can be obtained from John Sheehan: Telephone 01609 771878 or email jgsheehan@btinternet.com

 

 

 

Talks: The Roman Roads of North Yorkshire

The Roman Roads of North Yorkshire

A series of talks will commence in September on The Roman Roads of North Yorkshire. This programme is designed to both report on recent activity in the field and to encourage future research within a professional framework.

 * Saturday, 13th September, Mike Haken, Committee Member of the Roman Antiquities Section of the Yorkshire Archaeological Society and Editor of their Newsletter Roman Yorkshire, will introduce the subject and review the current state of knowledge.

 * Saturday, 11th October, Hugh Toller, an Independent Researcher and Field Archaeologist, will describe his recent work using LIDAR imagery to identify Roman  roads in the county. He will draw on the maps of John Warburton who traced many such routes in the first half of the 18C.

 * Saturday, 8th November, Dr David Mason, Principal Archaeologist of Durham County Council, and Editor of the journal of the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland, will describe recent work at Greta Bridge (Margary 82), and the associated Fort and Vicus.

 * Saturday, 13th December, John Brown, Independent Researcher, Field Archaeologist, and member of the Mid-Tees Research Project, will illustrate his investigations into the enigmatic Tees Crossing of Cades Road (Margary 80a).

 If successful, the programme will be extended by other contributions in the New Year. If you would like to take part in the proceedings, please contact John Sheehan on 01609 771878, or email  jgsheehan@btinternet.com

 The talks will be held at Thornton le Street Village Hall near Thirsk at 2.00 pm. Talks will last approximately one hour, after which there will be time for discussion and refreshment.  Admission will be £2 at the door.