Tag Archives: Tees Archaeology

CBA North: mid-June newsletter

CBA North News

Our email to you this time is another mixture of content – from a number of sources also – and from around the CBA North region.

Following our usual events listing for the remains of June, we’ve a contribution from a member on how archaeology has inspired their artistic work and studies, something looking ahead to a conference in October (not that we are wishing summer away already), notes on recent publications, posters for events (including one happening on Saturday) and throughout the summer, as well as a book sale. There is so much yet to come in the intervening months, such as July’s Festival of Archaeology no less!

As ever we continue to keep our Events website page up-to-date with details – three further talks have been added, as well as the title of another now confirmed, on that page since our last email to you. Please let us know any additions or alterations to that page or indeed the listing below.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
19.06.2019

June and July Events 2019
June 2019
3 June – Gods and heroes: public and private in Pompeian houses, Dr Thea Ravesi [BAS]
5 June – Riding West: Roman Cavalry Tombstones at Hexham & Beyond, Lindsay Allason-Jones [TILLVAS]
25 June – The Yarm Helmet, Chris Caple [TAS]
26 June – Paints and Pigments in the Past: colouring in the Roman Frontiers, Louisa Campbell [SOCANTS]

July 2019
13 July – Work in Thebes, Jose Manuel Galan [NEAES]
20 July – The Archaeology of Domestic Innovation in the Country House, Prof Marilyn Palmer [ARCH & ARCH]
31 July – From Women’s Rights to Human Rights: How the Struggle for the Vote Changed the World, Rosie Serdiville [SOCANTS]

Archaeology, Pots and back again (twice): a member explains all
Lorraine Clay, both a member of Tynedale Archaeology and CBA North groups, as well as potter has sent us this short article on how archaeology inspires her artistic work. She writes;

‘I’m a ceramic artist who draws inspiration from archaeology, this is ponderings on archaeology and pottery.

I’ve always been interested in Archaeology since Dad took us to The Wall when children and finding rock art with Mum as a teenager. When I studied A Level Archaeology in 1990 for something to do after work, I couldn’t have imagined the path that it would take. The A Level was so disorganised that I swore I would never do another qualification and looked for a leisure evening class: woodwork was daytime so I plumped for pottery.

One of my first pieces was directly inspired by Scottish Celtic crosses, then direct influences came from visiting Minoan sites in Greece: these included the 6’ tall storage jars in Malia with coils as thick as an arm, and the curious kernos vessels in Heraklion Museum. You can learn a lot from copying something – such as the challenges the potter faced – one Greek pot I was having trouble with the handles, I put my mind in the place of a hot tired potter who wanted to drink Raki in the shade, and there it was! The simplest and quickest method looked just right.

A Cretan Krater

As I approached 13 years with the Civil Service I took the plunge to devote myself to becoming a full-time potter. I began studies at Newcastle College and for four years sold work in galleries and exhibitions and ran evening classes. In 2006 I commenced the Contemporary Ceramics degree at Newcastle and was accepted to be the pottery tutor for Ashmore House, an NHS mental health daycentre. Newcastle gave me the impetus to be more experimental and I began weathering clay, a technique I still practice today.

Weathering is inspired by mortality: a fingerprint survives on a Minoan storage jar, a Neolithic vessel is patterned with nail impressions but the potter is long gone. A cat’s paw-print on a Roman roof tile…

Like ceramics we believe we are immortal, living for tomorrow we stay in unsatisfying jobs until walking home in a gale a dislodged gargoyle takes us out. (I heard this story many years ago on the radio of a man dying this way after gales in Scotland; googling it now I find a US woman died in 2014 from a falling gargoyle – maybe it’s not rare at all!).

We are more like unfired clay, endangered by random circumstances, wind and rain.  I think this is why I joined Altogether Archaeology: too many years had gone by without digging, I couldn’t resist any more: my knees were in remission. On my first molehill survey I found a jet bead and was hooked again. And it seemed natural to get permission to take a little of the clay we dug up home!

Lorraine at the Whitley Castle mole-hill survey

In 2016 I took a chance and applied to the Ness of Brodgar and was euphoric when I was accepted!

Weathered bowl before firing (above), weathering and wood-fired (below left and right respectively)

Sometimes I use archive materials and clay from archaeological sites. For an exhibition at the Durham Oriental Museum I morphed cuneiform envelopes into curvaceous “promise boxes” using Forest Hall clay following their ancient Middle East counterparts.

For a second exhibition I was delighted with a label just bearing the name Petrie on one vase: I made pieces celebrating the people, including Flinders Petrie, in the chain that had brought the artefact to Durham using clay from digs. William Thacker, who set up the Oriental Museum, is shown by the transfer print which on smoke-fired Low Hauxley clay.


When the daycentre closed it didn’t take long to become bored. I heard you didn’t need an archaeology degree to do an Archaeology postgraduate course, so I contacted Antonia Thomas at UHI (University of the Highlands and Islands), who told me she was starting an Art and Archaeology module the following week!

3 Orkney clays: Back row – unfired with shell: unfired without shell
Front row – fired with shell: unfired without shell.

I enjoyed it so much I applied to UHI and Durham to do an MA in Archaeology, focusing especially on the British Neolithic. Deciding between the two was one of the toughest decisions I’ve had to make! Two terms in and I find myself writing about ceramics not rock art – in Dolni Vestonice, Gravettian finger fluting, materials analysis: before I knew it, I was suggesting Clay in the Palaeolithic for my dissertation! Watch this space!…….’ 

[Many thanks to Lorraine for writing this article; if this has inspired you or you want to share your own archaeological inspiration, perhaps in different ways, please feel free to send us a short article to us at cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org for our next issue].

Tullie House Conference
Elsa Price of Tullie House Museum, Carlisle, and Kate Sharpe of Durham University have sent us the poster below on a busy October weekend they are planning on the prehistory of the Cumbrian area. If you are interested in the day, read on and follow up through the contact details given – contributions from all are most welcome!

(Fairly recent) Tees Archaeology publications
From recent the River Tees Rediscovered Landscape Partnership, Tees Archaeology have fairly recently published a pair of short booklets The First Great Civil War in the Tees Valley and Industry in the Tees Valley. These short well-illustrated freely-available booklets give introductions to the many sites of particular note for their respective subjects.


Whilst many other Civil War battlefields and sieges are known across CBA North’s region, the first of these highlights many of the smaller skirmishes that rarely figure in the national literature. This booklet was written by Robin Daniels and Phil Philo. A further leaflet for the Piercebridge encounter described is also available further down the website page mentioned below.

Industry upon Teesside, however, needs no introduction. However sites familiar and unfamiliar are dealt with in the booklet by Alan Betteney, for the whole variety of Teesside industries, though this is a rather larger file to download. Nevertheless both of these are freely available as downloads from the Tees Archaeology website Downloads page.

TillVAS’ Iron Age Day
Equally industriously in the north of Northumberland, this Saturday sees the Till Valley Archaeology Society hold an Iron Age Day. The poster below gives details of what you can expect, inside and out, at Etal Village Hall to give more of a background and context to their recent excavations at nearby Mardon Farm.

CBA National’s June Booksale
CBA North members might be interested to know that CBA National is having a Spring Sale on publications. They have reduced prices on more than 75 books including many of our recent Research Reports and Practical Handbooks. Their online shop can be visited here. The sale ends on 30 June 2019 so ideal for finding some holiday reading and/or post-exam relaxation.

Prehistoric Pioneers: an Exhibition and Events
Charley Robson, of Durham University’s Prehistoric Pioneers Education and Outreach Team, has written to let us know of this exhibition. She writes;

‘The Prehistoric Pioneers exhibition is now open to the public at the Durham Museum of Archaeology, Palace Green, Durham, until 24 November 2019. The exhibition explores life in ancient Britain, from warfare to rituals, and the way Bronze Age people buried weapons and treasure in hidden hoards. Curated by the Durham’s MA Museum and Artefact Studies students, this exhibition gives a face to prehistoric people and challenges the idea that these were primitive cultures. 
 
To coincide with the exhibition, a pair of talks have been planned to take place on the 20 and 24 June and which are detailed in the poster below. Some more details on these events are given below for those who might be interested to attend. Booking information is given through the poster and places can be booked in emailing archaeology.museum@durham.ac.uk. Further information on the exhibition, including that available who cannot get to Durham themselves, as a series of podcasts is available here‘.

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Future workshops and events

CBA North News

The events of the summer continue apace. Even in the last weeks of October and November we have notice of further events you might be interested in attending. All of the information included this time involves more opportunities for active involvement in recording, preserving and presenting, as well as discovering the varied past across our region.

As the end of the year approaches CBA North’s Committee is keen for local groups to promote to everyone else what they have been doing through the course of the year. We already have contributions from the Appleby Archaeology Group and the Arbeia Society, as well as notice of the recent publication of Northern Archaeology by the Northumberland Archaeological Group. If you would like to send something in please feel free to do so. There are no word limits, the opportunity to include pictures as well as links to your own society in what we can send out.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
23.10.2016

Defending the Teesside First World War Building Recording Project

Please follow the World War One building recording programme link for a copy of the form which you can download, complete with your details and send on if you are interested.

Events this week
There are two local group meetings this week.

On Tuesday night the Teesside Archaeological Society hosts Dr Becky Gowland of Durham University at Stockton Central Library whose talk begins at 7.30pm. Her talk Children of the Revolution draws upon her work with skeletal remains of children in the North of England during the Industrial Revolution, demonstrating health stresses in both urban-based and rural children. Surprisingly, higher-than-expected rates of health stress were found among rural children: possibly related to the relocation of pauper children from workhouses, to apprenticeships in rural-based Northern mills.

The following day the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle hold their annual public lecture as usual at the Curtis Auditorium of the Herschel Building, Newcastle University, where Nick Owen of the Northumbria Gardens Trust will talk on Kirkharle, Rothley and Alnwick: the three Northumberland landscapes of Capability Brown. This talk beings at 6.00pm.

Managing Places of Worship
We’ve been sent notice of this November training event by Historic England. Please follow the link, or feel free to contact Sophie direct, if you would like further details of the day.

Dear All,

Historic England is running a free 1-day course, Managing Places of Worship, which is aimed at church wardens, volunteers and others directly involved in managing Places of Worship (see attached flyer below). We will be discussing understanding significance, maintenance and adaption in order to sustain the historic building for the future.

If you are interested, please do use the following link to sign up for this course https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/managing-historic-places-of-worship-north-east-registration-25400996063.

Please note that this course is not aimed at heritage professionals, but at people directly involved with Places of Worship. Therefore, please do forward this invitation to any interested colleagues. It has been circulated quite widely, so apologies for any cross posting.

Thanks
Sophie

Sophie Norton
Training Delivery Officer
Research Group
Direct dial: 0161 242 1404 Mobile: 07342 064752

Brightwater Landscape Project
Joanne Norman of Groundwork North East & Cumbria writes of this project which is a Heritage Lottery Funded scheme headed by Durham Wildlife Trust. The aim of the scheme is to restore and celebrate the natural, built and cultural heritage of the catchment area of the River Skerne which includes Northern Darlington, Barmpton, Newton Aycliffe, Brafferton, Bishop Middleham, Sedgefield, Fishburn, Bradbury, Mordon, Sadberge and Heighington.

Groundwork are undertaking a Learning, Training and Volunteering Study to ascertain what demand there is in the catchment area for training and volunteering and information on its natural and built heritage. Community groups, heritage organisations, landowners, site managers and training providers are asked to complete a pair of surveys to help us build up a picture of what is required in the Brightwater Landscape area and we would like to hear from Local History Societies and environmental organisations in particular, who may be interested in volunteering or training within the heritage field – as natural heritage, built heritage, cultural heritage or local history.

There is an additional survey on the demand for information about the built, natural and cultural heritage of the area. If you or your members could comment on this it would give us some extremely valuable information, plus if you would like to put your group forward to get involved in the project there is the opportunity to indicate this in the questionnaires below.

It is anticipated that there will be opportunities for local communities to research their local history, take part in oral history projects or archaeological digs. Volunteering opportunities will be available in river or wildlife surveys, helping to restore and manage wetland and grassland nature reserves or helping to improve cycle and walking routes. There will also be cultural events and competitions which local people can get involved with. More information about the World War One building recording programmeproject can be found here, whilst the questionnaires can be found at https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/3DX9VJ2 and https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/35KFRYZ.

Defending the Tees

CBA North News

We’ve had various answers for the collective noun for the Roman archaeology conferences we sent you details of earlier this week – more suggestions are welcome!

Regardless of such trivial things the last email was one of our most read by 80 members (by members and who they passed it onto 235 at the last count). One of the reasons CBA North exists is to promote the work, events and activities of local groups across the area where themes, interests and information can be shared.

We have already been passed details for events in to 2017 by the Appleby Archaeology Group and the Till Valley Archaeological Society, and, as the start of this year, aim to send out a 2017 listing in January. Make sure your group’s programme is included as this tends to be the most read email and retweeted notice of the year! The news of what local groups have been up is also welcomed.

Short notice but there are events this weekend, as well as Monday, across the region and across all archaeological periods.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
14.10.2016

Defending the Tees

October 2016’s calendar of regular society events
3 October – Depicting the Dead: an insight into craniofacial analysis for forensic identification and archaeological investigation, Dr Eilidh Ferguson [BAS]
8 October – Death on the Nile: Uncovering Lives and the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt [NEAES]
9 October – Bosworth 1485, Dr Glenn Foard [TILLVAS]
12 October –  Excavations at Derwentcote: a Study in Nineteenth Century Worker’s Housing, Rob Young [NAG]
13 October – Mapping the Medieval Landscape of Cumbria, Dr Caron Newman [APPLEBY]
16 October – David Dippie Dixon Memorial Lectures: William Boyd and Controversy as well as Neanderthal Hunting and animal avoidance strategies, Professor Mark White [CCA]
19 October – The archaeology of St John Lateran and the transformation of Rome from Septimius Severus to Constantine, Professor Ian Haynes [ARCH & ARCH]
25 October – Children of the Revolution, Dr Becky Gowland [TAS]
26 October – Kirkharle, Rothley and Alnwick: the three Northumberland landscapes of Capability Brown, Nick Owen [SANT]

Details as to times and venues for all these events can be found in our Local Societies and Groups page (‘https://cbanorth.wordpress.com/local-societies-and-groups/‘) of our website.

North Gare Heritage Workshop: this weekend

North Gare Heritage Workshop: this weekend

Tees Archaeology will be helping to run a day of workshops exploring the heritage of the North Gare area between Seaton Carew and the River Tees on Sunday 18th October (10.00am-3.30pm).

The workshop will be held at the Teesmouth Field Centre at the EDF Power Station Visitor Centre.

The day will be split into two parts. In the morning people will be introduced to a range of historical sources of information about the area and take part in a series of exercises to reveal what this tells us about the local heritage. The sources used will include maps and aerial photographs along with historical and archaeological information about the area.

In the afternoon there will be a guided visit to the North Gare to look at features ranging in date from the medieval period to the Second World War.

The workshop is free but prior booking is essential. Please call 01429 853325 to reserve a place.

Please note this is a repeat of a workshop held in May 2015, for further information see : http://riverteesrediscovered.org/?newsletter=north-gare-heritage-workshop-2&lang=en

 

The English Civil War on Teesside: An Introduction

The English Civil War on Teesside: An Introduction

Saturday 11th July, 2015 Dorman Museum, Middlesbrough

This is a one day conference organised by the Battlefields Trust, Dorman Museum and Tees

Archaeology as part of the HLF funded River Tees Rediscovered Landscape Partnership Project.

The conference will introduce participants to the impact on the area of the English Civil War and will offer the opportunity for volunteers to get involved in a project to find out more about the period in the area.

10.00 am Arrive (Tea & Coffee)

10.15 Introduction (R Daniels, Tees Archaeology)

10.30 The Battlefields Trust (G Carter, Battlefields Trust}

10.45 Battlefield Archaeotogy of the English Civil War (R Leese, Huddersfield University)

11.30 ECW in the North — East Overview (P Philo, Dorman Museum)

12:15 Lunch

13:00 Costume and Equipment of the ECW (G Carter)

13:45 Battle of Yarm Bridge (P Philo, Dorman Museum)

14:30 17 th Century locations on Teesside (R Daniels, Tees Archaeology)

15.15 What next? (GC, RD, PP)

15.30 pm

Please note that lunch will not be provided, there is a cafe in the museum and shops nearby. Alternatively you may eat sandwiches on the premises.

If you would like to book on this Conference please provide the information below to:- Robin Daniels at

Tees Archaeology, e-mail  teesarchaeology@hartlepool.gov.uk     Tel 01429 523455

Name(s)

E-mail

Tel No.

Teesside in the First World War

Teesside in the First World War | Recording the Legacy

A joint project between TAS and Tees Archaeology

I see this as a great opportunity to record and research the area of Teesside during this conflict, which was well known to a remarkable generation of people. Many survived into old age but so rarely talked about the difficulties they must have experienced.

– Chris McLoughlin, TAS Member

  • Partners: TAS and Tees Archaeology*
  • Project Managers: Ed Higgins (TAS), Robin Daniels (Tees Archaeology)
  • Stage: planning and volunteer recruitment, pre-grant application
  • Contact: please contact TAS or Tees Archaeology to express an interest
  • More Info: read more on our website projects pages »

This joint project between TAS and Tees Archaeology* will record the archaeological evidence of the buildings, camps and other structures used during the First World War. Documents from the War provide a good starting point, and old maps and aerial photographs can give us a better idea of where sites were. By visiting the sites we can understand more about their history and physical character. Site visits also help to determine what condition the site is in and what needs to be done to preserve it.

Many of the sites still exist. For example, the Army used various houses and hotels in the area as sleeping quarters for troops. Other sites were never much more than a field which, in the case of Kirkleatham, the Royal Navy used as a mooring post for airships.

There is a great deal more that we would like to know—and record—about Teesside during the First World War. If you have any information to share, please get in touch using the contact details below. If you would like to be kept informed about the project and discover opportunities for involvement, please email teesarchaeology@hartlepool.gov.uk and keep returning to TAS’s website for updates.

Tees Archaeology

A Roman Villa at the Edge of Empire

image002

The results of the excavation of a Roman Villa at Ingleby Barwick, Stockton-on-Tees, ahead of house building in 2003/04 have just been published in a monograph by the Council for British Archaeology.

The main villa complex was preseved beneath a ‘village green’ but its ancilliary buildings inlcuding a heated room and a horse powered mill. High status finds included several sherds of Egyptian glass from a fine piece of tableware. For more details about the villa please check http://www.teesarchaeology.com/projects/Quarry%20Farm%20Villa/QuarryFarm.html

Elwick Village Atlas: Big Dig

In July Tees Archaeology helped residents of Elwick village carry out trial excavations on several areas of the village green as part of a Village Atlas Project.

A low earthwork on the north side of the green turned out to be an air raid shelter from World War II, a structure remembered by some residents.

An intriguing collection of coins from 1928-1945 were found in a concentration in a discrete area suggesting part of the green may have been used for a commercial purposes, perhaps a fair or market for a short period.

image0031

http://www.teesarchaeology.com/projects/Elwick_Village_Atlas/Elwick_Village_Atlas.html

North Cemetery, Hartlepool

Tees Archaeology, along with the Friends of North Cemetery, Hartlepool carried out a small trial excavation on a former cemetery lodge and two chapels.

The cemetery was opened in 1856 to serve the expanding port and town of West Hartlepool. The excavations noted that the buildings were founded on a mound of spoil, the result of dumping material excavated from the new docks. The buildings themselves were built of magnesium limestone blocks, which were probably also quarried from the docks themselves. As part of the project the Friends also carried out detailed recording on surviving memorials within the cemetery.

image004

Photo by Joseph Pullman, Friends of North Cemetery

World War I Project

Tees Archaeology are currently working to enhance our understanding of World War I military and civil sites across Teesside. These include a sea-plane base at Seaton Snook, Hartlepool, a sub-marine depot at South Gare and a wireless listening post for intercepting German communications at Rimswell, Stockton.

We are finding that many buildings were commandeered by Northern Command such as Thorpe House on Norton High Street, used as a hospital during the period.

image005

If you have any information on World War I sites in the area then we would love to hear from you.

Website          http://www.teesarchaeology.com/

 

Email              teesarchaeology@hartlepool.gov.uk