Tag Archives: survey

CBA North: October Events

CBA North News
Our CBA North news contains, as ever, a number of notices of events across the CBA North region – but in particular for Cumbria this time. In particular we are especially pleased to send you details of a regional archaeology conference in Carlisle, which your committee has felt privileged to be asked to support and has so agreed to support. We also have a short update on a Cumbrian project previously featured in our emails to you.

In addition our usual listing of events include those to come soon this month. These are from all round the CBA North region. However, also as ever, the sharp-eyed will notice changes on our Events website page (with two slight changes in details and 20 completely new entries), including those of our member groups the Appleby Archaeology Group, Coquetdale Community Archaeology and the Northumberland Archaeological Group.

We hope you that you enjoy these events and that you might contribute something, perhaps of your own local group’s activities this summer?, that you think that others might enjoy or should know of for our next issue.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee,
01.10.2019

Connected Communities: Northern Prehistory Conference: Tickets now available

The rock art motif and landscape of Long Meg, Cumbria, photographed by, and copyright of, Scott Wrigglesworth

Elsa Price, Curator at Tullie House Museum, Carlisle, has written a further piece outlining the conference which we sent in an earlier email to you. She writes of the two day conference;

‘I am pleased to announce that tickets are now available for the Northern Prehistory: Connected Communities conference at Tullie House in partnership with Durham University on the 12th and 13th October.

Professor Richard Bradley of Reading University, author of many articles and books on prehistory, will be delivering a speech on “North by North West: Sharing Problems and Answers” to set the scene for the conference. This weekend will bring together a range of professionals from archaeological units, curators, museum educators, students, academics and community centred groups and explore the interdisciplinary nature of the connections within Northern Prehistory.

The conference will be a great opportunity to discuss how public-facing heritage sites and projects can interact with and utilise archaeological and academic expertise. With the inclusion of Prehistory to the National Curriculum in 2014 both schoolchildren and the wider public are becoming interested in their prehistoric heritage, making this an important time to inspire new research and engagement that will move Northern prehistory into the 21st Century. Additionally the National Lottery and Heritage Fund is also placing greater stress upon the impact upon and diversity of participants and audiences in their sponsored projects, so I hope that this weekend will inspire further projects.

Tickets are £50 and will give delegates access to a full day of talks on Saturday (12th October), a half day of talks on the Sunday (13th of October) morning with an afternoon of interactive sessions and workshops to help develop your own local group projects. Lunch and refreshments, on both days, are included with the ticket fee. Conference tickets also grant attendees free access to the museum for the weekend of the conference.

Tickets are now available through the Tullie House box office. Please call 01228 618700 or visit Eventbrite (for which a small booking fee applies) here.

Bursaries
The Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society will award four Clare Fell Fund Bursaries of up to £150 each to students to attend this conference.

Applications (no need for an application form) should be made direct to the society treasurer Dr W D Shannon at treasurer@cumbriapast.org giving name, address, age, institution attended, course i.e. graduate/post-graduate and any special interests. Applications for one of these bursaries should be made as soon as possible.

Sponsorship
This conference has been kindly sponsored by the Council for British Archaeology North. 

Further Information and Enquiries
Please see the conference programme below. For further information please visit the Tullie House website. For any other enquiries please contact me, Elsa Price, through my own email address here, or my colleague Kate Sharpe through her email address here‘.

The programme
This is a provisional programme and may be subject to change

Day 1: Saturday 12th October
09:30 Registration, Tea and Coffee served in the function room

SESSION 1 (Lecture Theatre): 10:00 – 10:30
10:00 Welcome: Gabrielle Heffernan
10:10 Introduction: Elsa Price and Kate Sharpe
10:30 Keynote: Richard Bradley “North by northwest: sharing problems and asking questions”

11:15-11:30 Short comfort break

SESSION 2: SETTING THE SCENE
Chair: Kate Sharpe
Lecture Theatre: 11:30-12:45
11:30 Something for everyone: Early Prehistory in North West England
Sue Stallibrass, Historic England
11:55 Prehistory in the Lake District: recent discoveries and future research
Eleanor Kingston, LDNPA Archaeology Officer
12:20 Recent landscape studies in Cumbria and the potential for further research
Joel Goodchild, Archaeological Research Services Ltd
12:45 Presenting Prehistory
Elsa Price, Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery
13:10 END

13:10-14:00 Lunch served in function room

SESSION 3A and B (Lecture Theatre + Meeting Room): 13:45-15:15
3B: TRACES of LIFE and DEATH  
Lecture Theatre
Chair: Paul Frodsham
3A: EARLY ENCOUNTERS with PREHISTORY
Meeting Room
Chair: Elsa Price
14:00 Early Neolithic settlement and votive deposition in Cumbria and beyond
David Cockcroft, Robin Holgate and Clive Waddington (Archaeological Research Services Ltd Abstract)
Preparing for Prehistory. Creating a schools engagement programme from scratch
Kathryn Wharton, Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums
14:25 Monumentality, mortality, metalwork and Morecambe
Brendon Wilkins (DigVentures), Stuart Noon (DigVentures), Edward Caswell (Portable Antiquities Scheme), Johanna Ungemach (DigVentures) and Benjamin Roberts (Durham University)
Curating education: A collaborative approach to developing an object-based prehistory offer
Katherine Baxter and Emily Nelson, Leeds Museums and Galleries
14:50 Early Bronze Age burial and funerary practices in Cumbria and beyond
David Cockcroft and Ben Dyson (Archaeological Research Services Ltd Abstract)
Facing the challenge of teaching Key Stage 2 audiences about Prehistory at the Museum
Paddy Holland, Durham University Library and Heritage Collections Learning Team
15:15 Rock art without borders: ‘Cumbrian’ carvings in a wider context
Kate Sharpe, Durham University
Researching Museums Collections
Gabrielle Heffernan, Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery
15:40 END END

15:40-16:10 Tea and coffee served in function room

SESSION 4A and B (Lecture Theatre + Meeting Room): 15:30-17:00 
4A: THE PURSUIT of STUFF
 Lecture Theatre Chair: Elsa Price
4B: THE AXE FACTOR
 Meeting Room Chair: Kate Sharpe
16:10 People and their pots: the Bronze Age pottery of Cumbria
Clara Freer, Exeter University
Searching for hidden treasures: finding and recording Neolithic stone axes in Cumbria
Sally Taylor, Oxford University
16:35 Prehistoric Treasures from Cumbria: Tullie House Museum Acquisitions & Artefacts recorded with the Portable Antiquities Scheme
Dot Boughton, freelance archaeological services
Hansel and Gretel in Neolithic Yorkshire: what might they teach us of the stone axe distribution routes?
David P. Davidson
17:00 Living among the monuments: lithic scatters in the Vale of Eden, Cumbria
Antony Dickson, Annie Hamilton-Gibney and Aaron Watson
“Follow the groove, man.” An exploration of the role of wayfaring and movement in the landscape of the Langdale axe factories, Cumbria
Marnie Calvert, University of Glasgow
17:25 END END

17:30-18:30 Self-guided gallery tour
19:00 Conference dinner. Please either meet in the reception area at 18:30 to walk to the restaurant or meet directly there for dinner at 19:00.

Day 2: Sunday 13th October
10:00 – 10:30 Tea and coffee served in the function room

SESSION 5A and 5B (Lecture Theatre + Meeting Room): 10:00-11:20
5B: MONUMENTAL LANDSCAPES
Meeting Room
Chair: Kate Sharpe
5A: STAINTON
Lecture Theatre
Chair: Gabrielle Heffernan
10:30 Monuments on the mountains: recent fieldwork at boulder-built structures in the Lake District fells
Aaron Watson, Peter Style, Peter Rodgers
Stainton West and beyond
Fraser Brown and Helen Evans, Oxford Archaeology North
10:55 The brilliance of the Shap prehistoric landscape
Emma Watson, Durham University
After CNDR: the bigger Neolithic picture
Helen Evans, Oxford Archaeology North
11:20 Long Meg: at the heart of Neolithic Britain
Paul Frodsham
Social networking in an age without social media. Understanding variation in lithic technology from Late Mesolithic Structures at the site of Stainton West near Carlisle
Robert Rhys Needham, UCLAN
11:45 END END

 
11:45-12:00 Comfort break

SESSION 6 Closing Discussion (Lecture Theatre)
12:00 Closing discussion: The future of northern Prehistory
 Led by Paul Frodsham
12:30 END

 
 12:30-13:30: Lunch served in cafeteria
  

SESSION 7: PREHISTORY IN ACTION
Meeting Room
13:30 Workshop – Tullie House Prehistory Schools Session: A Practical Guide
Sarah Forster, Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery
14:30 Workshop – Axe Knapping
James Dilley, Ancient Craft UK
15:30 Guided Prehistory Gallery Tour
Elsa Price, Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery
16:30 Self-Guided gallery time
17:00 END

Regular October 2019 Events
6 October – James IV Memorial Lecture: In the Land of the Giants – a journey through the Dark Ages, Max Adams [TILLVAS]

7 October – Carpow, Corbridge and Carlisle: Roman armour developments in Northern Britain, Dr Jon Coulson [BAS]
9 October – First Farmers in Neolithic Britain: new methods, new interpretations, Prof Peter Rowley-Conwy [NAG]
10 October – Appleby Moot Hall, Marion Barter [APPLEBY]
12 October – An Introduction to Anglo-Saxon Church Architecture in Stone and Early Vernacular Buildings focusing on Medieval longhouses and their Post-Medieval derivatives, Alan Newham and Martin Roberts respectively [ALTOGETHER]
12 October – Re-opening the Medieval Castle: micro-stories from material culture, Dr Karen Dempsey [ARCH & ARCH]

12 October – My Favourite Things in the Egypt Centre, Carolyn Graves-Brown [NEAES]
13 October – David Dippie Dixon lectures: Exploring an historic townscape and its hinterland: Wallingford from Saxon to late Medieval, and Bell towers: origins, forms and functions, Prof Neil Christie [CCA]
14 October – Binchester Roman Fort, David Mason [LUNESDALE]
29 October – Rock Art of the uKhahlamba-Drakensberg in South Africa, Aron Mazel [TAS]
30 October – The Manorial Documents Register For Northumberland, Sue Wood [SOCANTS]

Advertisements

CBA North: Start of April newsletter

CBA North News
In this issue we have the details of the April events soon to come your way, as well as news from a number of projects and publications from across CBA North-land from four of our local group members. This email was drafted out on Saint Cuthbert’s Day, and like him we criss-cross the region in what news we have to share.


From Cumbria we have a summary of the Appleby Archaeology Group’s investigations across their local golf course (including rare Bronze Age evidence) whilst from Northumberland we have an update on the Border Roads Project of Coquetdale Community Archaeology. Members may recall the fieldwork and plans for both of these projects, here we now report upon their successful completion and publication.

From two other of our group members, the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland once again and the Northumberland Archaeological Group we have notices of their own recent publications. The contents of both volumes also listed for you here as well.

Please feel free to circulate our news around your own contacts and groups. We hope that our next email to you will be out mid-month, next month, reporting further news from across the region.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
31.03.2019

April Events 2019
1 April – The Enigmatic Trusty’s Hill: Royal Capital of Rheged, Dr Chris Bowles [BAS]

3 April – AGM and An Update on the 2018 Mardon Excavation, Richard Carlton [TILLVAS]
8 April – Lowick Races (Horses, Bikes and Athletics) and the Lowick Feast 19th-20th centuries, Julie Gibbs and cast [Lowick Heritage Group]
8 April – Mediaeval village landscape in Cumbria, David Johnson [LUNESDALE]
9 April – Cold War to Coal Trains – TOPS, British Railways’ First Computer Train Operating System, Johnathan Aylen [NEWCOMEN]
10 April – A History of Alnwick Castle Gardens as revealed through excavation and building recording, Jenny Proctor [NAG]
11 April – A Roman bath house at Stanwix, Frank Giecco [APPLEBY]
11 April – The Eslington Sword, Prof Sam Turner [CCA]
24 April – Magnificent Women and the Revolutionary Machine; The extraordinary individuals who founded the Women’s Engineering Society in 1919, Henrietta Heald [SOCANTS]
25 April – Annual General Meeting and Chairman’s Choice [Tyneside Industrial Archaeology Group]
27 April – Long Meg and her Daughters, Paul Frodsham [ALTOGETHER]
27 April – Living in Harm’s Way: Further reflections on the Development of Hornby Castle, Wensleydale 1000-1700, Erik Matthews [ARCH & ARCH]

[As noted we continue to keep our Events website page up-to-date with details; please let us know any additions or alterations to that page or indeed this listing. More one-off or annual events can be sent to us at any time, Ed.]

Appleby Archaeology Group: Fieldwork on the Green
Our CBA North AGM in 2016 included a talk from our group member the Appleby Archaeology Group on their forthcoming Dig Appleby which we covered in a later email to you. However the group’s previous project has now been published. Here Martin Railton, Research Officer of the group, gives us a summary of their project;

‘Between 2009 and 2013 the Appleby Archaeology Group carried out a number of small-scale surveys and excavations across a range of monuments located at Brackenber Moor adjacent to the Appleby Golf Course. Despite the hazards of flying golf balls and more, the group carried out both geophysical surveys and excavations of a range of features in the area. Some of these features were freshly identified by the group during the survey carried out in 2009,whilst others had been known about – albeit misidentified – in the archaeological literature for some time.

The highlight of the excavation aimed to record the details of one of these earlier recorded sites – a roughly circular flat area, partly surrounded by a pair of crescent-shaped ditches, was thought to be one of the chain of Roman signal stations that operated between the Stainmore Pass and the larger Roman roads to the west and east. The large post-holes and structure of a signal station were expected. However our excavations revealed this to be a different type of monument altogether and one much, by thousands of years, older.

The feature was revealed to be an enclosed cremation cemetery – a funerary monument typical of the Early Bronze Age. Our excavations across the centre of monument revealed a number of pits, some containing human cremated remains and prehistoric pottery dating to the Bronze Age. Samples were taken at the time of excavation and only now, following the post-excavation process, can a fuller story of the monument be told. This appears to have been a multi-phase monument and, surprisingly, extending into Middle Bronze Age times from the radiocarbon dating of samples of human bone. These yielded a date of 1740 to 1630 BC when sampled at the SUERC lab. This was quite surprising when nationally evidence of funerary activity starts to disappear.

Other sites were sampled, but perhaps none with so spectacular results as the cremation cemetery. These included a scheduled cairn of likely Bronze Age date, which revealed evidence for earlier Mesolithic and Neolithic activity in the vicinity. Our fieldwork was carried out by the group in conjunction with the North Pennines AONB Altogether Archaeology Project with support from Wardell Armstrong Archaeology. We are grateful to them for their support and the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society for funding the post-excavation work, without which the Transactions article could not have been published’.

[The full excavation report can be read in the most recent Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society (3rd series volume 18), Ed.].

The Border Roads Project: Taking the High Road
David Jones, Secretary of Coquetdale Community Archaeology, reports on their recent work as The Border Roads Project. He writes;

‘Based in North Northumberland, Coquetdale Community Archaeology (CCA) was founded in 2008 at the conclusion of a community archaeology project funded by the Northumberland National Park Authority. One of its first major projects as an independent group was the identification and excavation of a thirteenth-century fulling mill on the River Coquet at Barrowburn, about five miles upstream from Alwinton. Built by the Newminster monks from Morpeth, the project uncovered one of the best-preserved medieval wheel pits in the country, with a wheel configuration otherwise known only from the sixteenth century.

The project was a success, with large numbers of volunteers, many visitors, and two papers in Archaeologia Aeliana. But rather than rest on their laurels, CCA decided to follow this up with a broader initiative, one that would include not just excavation, but also walking, photography, surveying, research, design and writing.

The Border Roads project, reported in earlier CBA newsletters and funded by the HLF and the National Park, started in 2014 and ended in December. Its focus was on the rich set of archaeology found along the Border Roads – the ancient routes through the Cheviots such as Dere Street, Clennell Street and The Street that connect what are now England and Scotland.

The purpose of the project was to research and document this archaeology, but above all to communicate its presence to as wide an audience as possible. It’s very clear that many people who visit the hills are unaware of the history they are moving through – walking past ridges, shapes and ruins in the landscape without any real idea of what they are missing.

So CCA teams delved into archives, travelled the roads and planned walks and tours. There were excavations too – four different sites in the five summers of the project, often two in one year. There were four seasons of work at a site by the Hepden Burn, where an unprepossessing rectangular earthwork was found to conceal not only a seventeenth-century agricultural building but, under that, a carefully-laid paved medieval floor.

This site has been the subject of a recent excavation report in Medieval Archaeology (Nolan and Jones, 2018 volume 62/2 in the Fieldwork Highlights for 2017).

Excavation has now started on a scheduled site at the deserted settlement of Linbrig, also by the Coquet. Although the Border Roads project has finished, this work will continue until 2020, with the objective of looking at several structures on the site, including what are probably farmhouses and a corn drying kiln.

With its focus on communication, the project has produced a website (www.border-roads.org/) and two books. The first of these – The Old Tracks through the Cheviots – weighs in at over 200 pages. Its early chapters cover the history of the hills, the records left about them and the types of structures found there. Then each route is examined in turn, with details of the archaeology along them.
The second book – Walking the Old Tracks of the Cheviots – is a portable ring-bound guide to nine carefully-documented walks on either side of the border. Again in full colour and designed to be carried out on the hills, it provides detailed route instructions and precise map references, as well descriptions and histories of what people might otherwise miss.

Both books are available from book shops, on-line from the usual suspects, or direct from the publisher, Northern Heritage.

With all the work that’s gone into it, the involvement of over 90 volunteers and the outputs described, it’s clear the project has been a success. Other people think so too. In November CCA won a competition organised by National Parks UK for their Volunteer Project of the Year. Open to all volunteer projects across the country, and for any kind of work in a National Park, the award brought not only a trophy, but a bursary of £1000 to help CCA continue its work’.

Recent publications 1: Durham Archaeological Journal 21
Also fairly hot off the press our group members the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland – the ‘Arch & Arch’ – who reported their 2018 activities in our last issue, have published the latest volume of their Durham Archaeological Journal

The varied contents of volume 21 include the following;

The excavation of an Anglo-Saxon arable enclosure at Easington, County Durham by Kevin Horsley, 1-5
Hexham Abbey, Northumberland: archaeological excavation, monitoring and historic building recording 2012-14 by Richard Carlton and Peter Ryder, 6-81
A late medieval pectoral cross recovered from the River Wear near Elvet Bridge, Durham City by Gary Bankhead, 83-102
Kepier water-mill, Durham City: a conjectural reconstruction by John M Coffey, 103-134
Hebburn Hall, South Tyneside by Richard Pears, 135-165
Forgotten antiquarians? William Greenwell and his northern contemporaries by Rob Young, 167-186

[Members who attended our various Hexham meetings in 2013 will recall the archaeological work required in advance of the development of the Abbey Centre. It is those pieces of work that are reported in the Hexham Abbey article of this issue, Ed.].

Recent publications 2: Northern Archaeology 23
Gordon Moir, Editor for the Northumberland Archaeological Group, gives us details of their latest Northern Archaeology. He writes;

‘The Northumberland Archaeological Group (NAG) announces the recent publication of volume 23 of its journal Northern Archaeology. This volume is dedicated to the memory of Colin Burgess, the founder of NAG, who died in 2014. Contents relate to the archaeological life of Colin and the work he directed in Portugal; it includes colour pictures, maps, diagrams and plans, is printed on high quality cartridge paper and with a paper binding.
 
Copies may be purchased from the Editor: Gordon Moir, 7 Albury Road, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 3PE; gordon.moir@blueyonder.co.uk ; 0191 284 5062. The prices are: in the UK £17 which includes postage and packing; within Europe (which includes Eire) £21 and for the rest of the world £25. These costs are for both Institutions and individuals. Cheques should be made payable to “Northumberland Archaeological Group”. For details of bank transfer contact the Editor.

The contents are:
Editorial, iii-iv
A later-20th century mould for casting a Bronze Age from the north-east of England; A life of Colin Burgess
by Roger Miket, 1-21
Colin Burgess: a Bibliography, 23-34
Colin Burgess and the Bronze Age Studies Group by John Waddell, 35-40
NAG: The First Twenty-Five Years, 1973-1998 by Gordon Moir, 41-54
Archaeological Work in the Évora Area – Preamble by Gordon Moir, 55-56
The Évora Project 1986-91, 1993 by Frances Lynch, 57-60
The Megalithic Tomb Survey by Frances Lynch, 61-77
Excavations and Survey at Monte do Casão, 1990 by Anthony Harding and Melanie Pomeroy, 79-84
The Late Bronze and Iron Age enclosures of the Évora region by Catriona Gibson, 85-95
The Search for the Roman hinterland of Évora: thirty years on by Steven Willis, 97-106
Évora Archaeological Survey: Fieldwalking by Margaret Maddison, 107-118
The impact of the Évora Archaeological Survey (EAS) project in Portuguese Archaeology by Virgílio Hipólito Correia, 119-124

The Bibliography is an augmented and extended version of those published previously.

 
Colin in France, April 2013, on his last Archaeotrekker’s trip, at La Chaire à Calvin, near Angouleme.

Corrections
Our last email noted the changes made for the Local Societies and Groups website page for the Northern Archaeological Group, rather this should have been the Northern Archaeology Group. In case of any other alterations to this, or any other website page, please let us know by emailing cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org.

Dear CBA North Members,

It has been some while since the last CBA North email news. As ever much has been happening behind the scenes and we have some end of the year things for you here. Our website pages, as well as below, now reflect the changes in committee following our August AGM in Newcastle; those who weren’t there missed an interesting meeting, as well as the following detailed, and excellent, tour of St Nicholas Cathedral, during the summer.

We have had some comments (with the preference for more ad hoc emails) to our last quick question of you our members in our last email, but all feedback is welcome at any other 2018 or 2019 time.

Our next email to you will be at the start of the New Year; we already have some news items in hand, but we would gladly welcome a few more for January.

Is this a Christmas card or caption competition?
In recent years we’ve had a series of suitably seasonal pictures showing some ridge and furrow earthworks in the snow, a mural from a church and last year the Kirknewton magi sculpture. This year’s offering is from your new Chair Don O’Meara, who took up office in August, noting it a Nenthead Christmas.

Whether you regard this as a Christmas card or ripe for a caption competition we wish you our best wishes for Christmas and the New Year from all the CBA North Committee.

Events to come in 2019?
There are near 50 events listed ready for the 2019 events listing and our website Events page which we send on the link to at the start of the year. However we know that there will be more than this mere figure, including those events of some of our own group members. If you would like your group’s programme to be included, please let us know over the Christmas to New Year break. As ever the website page will be updated with fresh dates as we know of them.

Community Archaeology survey 2018; the results
One of our previous emails this year included a link to CBA National’s survey of all community archaeology groups; thank you to every who took the time to fill in this survey. The results are now out in CBA National’s CBA Research Bulletin number 6; this can be found online here.

The full report is 56 pages, but there are a number of headline recommendations and thoughts to;

  1. Create a central digital platform which gives clear and advice, signposting and guidance for community groups with a local and national collaborative space.
  2. Establish a learning and development provision at county level.
  3. Assess the logistics and viability of a bespoke accreditation scheme.
  4. Actively engage in partnerships which encourage diverse participation.
  5. Create a survey to provide comparable relevant data of younger age groups.
    If you have any thoughts or ideas on these recommendations – for CBA North and/or CBA National – for what we do in the future, please feel free to email us your views to cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org. We are progressing some ideas for 2019, but keen to know what you would like as well.

Archaeology for All Audience Development Surveys
Claire Corkhill has written to us about work associated with the current Archaeology for All campaign of CBA National. She writes and welcomes any responses to these surveys whether you are a CBA National to North member or not, CBA group member or not, that;

As I’m sure you’re all aware, the CBA recently received a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund and we’re currently undertaking work that will help us become a stronger organisation for the future. As part of this we have developed a short survey to help us find out what people think of the CBA.

You can complete the survey as an individual and as a representative of an organisation and we’d encourage you to respond to both surveys. They only take a few minutes to complete but will help shape the future of the CBA.

You can access the surveys via the following link:
http://new.archaeologyuk.org/news/archaeology-is-for-all
Please could I also ask you to share the survey with your members.

Many thanks for your help and time.

Best wishes
Claire
Claire Corkill

Executive Administrator, CBA National

If you would like copies of the full questionnaires to have a look at to mull over or discuss your answers with others, before filling them in online, please feel free to get in contact with us.

 

CBA North news this week

CBA North News
We’ve a few announcements in this email for you from a variety of sources. Firstly there is a CBA National survey which is anticipated as an up-to-date summary of all local archaeological groups across England and Wales, some further details of the Teesside Archaeological Society, reminders of other events from Appleby to Berwick, via Newcastle and Crookham, this and next month, as well as a note about the forthcoming General Data Protection Regulations.

If you would like to submit anything, or indeed for the next CBA North Committee, please feel free to do so. The contributions and thoughts of all Members and Followers are most welcome at any time.

Much of our admin work behind the scenes over the next few weeks will be preparing things for the General Data Protection Regulations. We will make it as painless and easy for you as possible, but we can’t ignore it as the law.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
27.03.2018

CBA National’s Community Archaeology Survey
CBA North members may remember the work of our former Secretary Suzi Thomas with CBA National back in 2009 and 2010. This provided a baseline of all archaeological groups which was published in 2010. Debbie Frearson, now at CBA National, has written to give us and therefore you details of a fresh survey;

“The Council for British Archaeology (CBA) has launched a survey about archaeology volunteering. We want to find who out takes an active part in community archaeology and what kind of things you get involved with. Most importantly we’d like to know about the kinds of additional support you need to thrive and how the Council for British Archaeology might be able to help you. The last time we asked you about this was 10 years ago and a lot has changed since then! We would appreciate it if you could distribute this email to your members, the survey can be completed by a representative of a group or an individual.

The CBA brings together the interests of a wide range of people and organisations involved with archaeology in the UK. This includes commercial archaeologists, those working in local authorities, museums or other parts of the archaeological heritage sector; universities; community archaeologists and volunteers. We will use the results from the survey, which has been funded by the Headley Trust,  to help shape the work of the CBA over the coming period and better tailor the support we, and others, can offer to community archaeology.

Click here to start the survey https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/CBA_Community_archaeology_2018. The survey closes on Thursday 29 March 2018.

Thank you for your help.

[If you would like a copy of all survey questions so you can discuss and debate your answers between your local group’s committee, please let us know and we’ll see if we can forward one onto you. Since the last survey a number of new local groups have formed, so this survey will be very useful as an up-to-date summary of what is happening and where. Please forward this email or the survey link on to others!].

Tonight’s TAS talk
Teesside Archaeological Society’s monthly talk, tonight, at Stockton is Chris Casswell of DigVentures. He will be talking on a series of excavations across, adjacent and related to sites in CBA North-land. His title is Lindisfarne to Lancaster: Community-based Excavations in the North of England (and a bit of Scotland).

This talk will look at a number of excavations – from a Bronze Age barrow to Medieval village – that have happened, most notably at Lindisfarne, as well as one to come this year in Scotland related to Durham and Lindisfarne. As normal for TAS events this will be at Stockton Library at 7.30.

Other events to come in March and April 2018
As we are in the last week of March and an Easter break close at hand for many here is a quick snapshot of what is happening across CBA North-land from our Events page for the end of March and start of April. Just today we have also have updated this page with all the TAS events planned as well.

28 March – A frontier and community in transition: the Tungrian Vindolanda, Andrew Birley [SOCANTS]

9 April – Durham and the Battle of Dunbar: Identifying Scottish soldiers at Palace Green, Durham, Richard Annis [BAS]
11 April – The Peregrini Project: Excavations on Lindisfarne, Richard Carlton [NAG]
12 April – The Late Iron Age royal site at Stanwick, North Yorkshire: new perspectives, Professor Colin Haselgrove [APPLEBY]

Looking further ahead we also have heard of one group’s 2018 to 2019 programme already!

Further details are through our website pages for the groups, the times and venues of these meetings. We hope you can get along to them!

General Data Protection Regulations
We will shortly be writing to all members about these changes which are very important for how we contact you. This means some changes to our Social Media and Digital Information Policy which was adopted in 2016, which are largely tweaks that Committee are working through.

In the meantime we have some notes from CBA National highlighting what local groups need to do and as a possible template for your group. If there is a demand from our local group members, then we might look to hold a meeting for you on this before the end of May deadline. Let us know if you would be interested in this.

Or if your group ahead of the pack, then let us know so we can highlight your work to others of the CBA North network.

An A, B and C of archaeology across CBA North

CBA North News

Another month comes, as does another CBA North email. This time round we have another range from across the CBA North region of what is happening and has happened. We take our prompts today from our own initials with announcements for a coffee morning (complete with archaeological display) and a report on the Coniston Copper project for the ‘C’s, an announcement for an Alpine axeheads lecture as well as a note from the Arbeia Society for the ‘A’s.

Where the ‘B’ you might well ask? That is the behind the scenes ‘busy’ that Committee are in preparing such emails, as well as our own events in April and May, for you. We hope that you will also be busy in attending these events of your own and other local groups. Hopefully the next CBA North email will be out to you by this time next week with some further news.

Nonetheless our best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 06.02.2017

TillVAS Coffee Morning
[The weekend coming up has two events; this is the first of the two posters for you – Ed].

The Coniston Copper Project: Penny Rigg
[Members will recall that we put out a call for volunteers for this project during the summer of last year. This article, contributed by Penny Middleton of Northern Archaeological Associates, details the work carried out so far, Ed.]

“In August 2016 local volunteers from the Lake District National Park, working together with specialists from Northern Archaeological Associates (NAA), undertook a survey of the remains of Penny Rigg copper mill, near Coniston (NGR NY 30656 00695). The mill is prime example of a single-phase, medium-sized, ore dressing and processing plant, associated with Tilberthwaite copper mine. The project was funded by the HLF as part of the Coniston Copper Project; a two-year programme administered by the Lake District National Park Authority (LDNPA), which aims to engage the local people in the history and conservation of the areas’ nationally important mining heritage.


The view across the site
 
Tilberthwaite copper mine was first worked under the auspices of the Mines Royal, during the in the Elizabethan period but mined only sporadically after this until taken over by John Barratt, former manager at the nearby Coniston copper mine, in the mid-19th century. Barratt drove a new adit – Horse Crag Level – 1,039 yard (950m) from Penny Rigg to Tilberthwaite to intersect the valuable North Vein. This was intended to improve both transportation and drainage to the mine, and was anticipated to take seven years at a cost of £3,000. However, from the outset the venture was beset with problems, eventually taking 10 years to complete at an undisclosed cost considerably which was significantly over the original initial estimate.
 
Ore from the mine was loaded onto wagons and brought through Horse Level to Penny Rigg, where Barratt and his partners invested in the construction of a new copper mill. Here the ore was sorted, crushed and processed before being sent for smelting. Work on the mill is believed to have begun in 1864 and completed by 1867-68 but it did not remain in operation long, closing soon after the sale of the mine in 1875. The mill later re-opened briefly in the early 1890s, but closed again in 1892, after which the plant was dismantled and the wheel sold for scrap.


The remains of the crushing mill 

Today, the 1.5ha site comprises the semi-ruinous remains a number of buildings – the crusher house and dressing mill, smithy and powder house – as well as various terraces, two settling ponds, leats, holding pond, spoil tips and tracks, all of which are overlain in part by later quarry waste. The entrance to the Horse Crag Level remains visible and the tunnel has recently been cleared by the Cumbria Amenity Trust Mining History Society (CATMHS), although it is unsafe to access without appropriate equipment and supervision. To the north of the site are the expansive remains of Penny Rigg (Horse Crag) quarry, worked commercially since the mid-18th century.


Rectified photographic survey using a total station

The aim of the community survey was twofold. Firstly, to engage local volunteers in the history and conservation of the site through providing practical, hands-on training, and secondly, to prepare a detailed analytical survey (Historic England Level 2/3) of the surface earthworks and structures. The latter was required to inform a subsequent phase of building conservation. A comprehensive record of the complex was made comprising a topographic, earthwork and building survey. The focus was on ensuring the volunteers received a firm grounding in traditional survey skills – plane table, tape and offset – which could be easily transferred to other mining sites in the area. The use of aerial drones, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), reflectorless total station theodolites (REDM), and rectified photography were also demonstrated.
 
A full copy of the report can be downloaded for free from the NAA website, or contact Penny Middleton at pm@naaheritage.com. If you interested in taking part in the Coniston Copper Project then please contact Eleanor Kingston at Eleanor.Kingston@lakedistrict.gov.uk or check the project website at http://www.lakedistrict.gov.uk/learning/archaeologyhistory/coniston-copper for details. Further survey work is planned for March at the site of Low Mill Bonsor for three weeks.


Plane table surveying 1

NAA would like to thank all the volunteers who took part for their enthusiasm and dedication throughout the three-week project. We are also indebted to CBA North and the Archaeological and Architectural Society of Durham and Northumberland for the loan of the plane table, and to Warren Allison and his colleagues at CATMHS for their knowledge, advice and support”.


Plane table survey 2

Local group round-up: The Arbeia Society
Paul Bidwell has sent us this small snippet on The Arbeia Society whose annual conference we publicised last year;

“The Society, apart from its re-enactment group, confines itself at present to arranging the annual conference and its publications, including the Arbeia Journal, but a range of new activities are being planned”.

[We look forward to hearing of those events, Ed.]

Alpine axeheads announcement
[As the second announcement for the weekend coming, here is the poster for the next lecture of our group member the ‘Arch & Arch’. This lecture covers these axes which have been found across Britain and Europe, but will also note their comparative rarity and the science that allows the axes to be traced to source, Ed.].

Other Events This Week
Other events this week also include;

6 February – Celts, Fraser Hunter [BAS]
8 February – Excavations at Hepden Burn and Kyloe Shin, John Nolan and Richard Carlton [CCA]
8 February – Prehistoric Life and Death at Lochinver, Philippa Cockburn [NAG]
9 February – The Prehistoric Origins of the A1(M), Dr Blaise Vyner [APPLEBY]
10 February – The Clayton Archaeological Collection, Frances McIntosh [WCAS]
13 February – The Neolithic in the North-West: What makes this region different?, Gill Hey [LUNESDALE]

Contact details for each of these local societies and groups can be found through our own website pages if you have any questions regarding their times and venues.

Creative archaeology – November in CBA North-land

CBA North News

We apologise for the lateness of this issue in reaching you, but hope that the up to the minute information below is some recompense. In answer to our earlier question for a collective noun of Roman conferences we were quite taken for a “Convivium” suggested by Dave Barter, one of our many Twitter Followers.

This time the theme is ‘creation’ with notice of a recent publication, of objects from Neolithic stone axes to Victorian stained glass within the local group lectures, and the creation of our shared archaeological heritage in the construction of Hadrian’s Wall itself, the development of archaeology from antiquarianism (with reference to ‘The Wall’) as well as for a World Heritage Site and its own unique challenges.

We are gathering materials reviewing the year from local groups – if you would like to send in what your group has been up to please do – as well as looking ahead to 2017 (we already have the programmes of three local groups). These emails tend to be the most widely read, and circulated, of the year (420+ that read the email, whilst 300 viewed the website events page one day and the Twitter notice was circulated to over 16000). So it is well worth a quick note to promote your work to us, everyone else of the other local groups and members of no affiliation other than to CBA North as well.

You could be out almost everyday this week at one or other event that we’ve listed for you here!

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
06.11.2016

Northern Archaeology
The Northumberland Archaeological Group (NAG) have recently published a volume of their journal Northern Archaeology in memory of Ian Colquhoun, well-known regionally and internationally as an expert for the Bronze Age, in particular of metalwork and specifically swords.

This contains a range of articles which CBA North Members and followers might be interested in – two cover Bronze Age swords with one written by Ian from his MA thesis on the findspots of Northumbrian Bronze Age swords and one with a member of his lifelong learning group on a single sword from near Durham. An obituary of Ian and bibliography of his publications are also included.
The results of two landscape surveys on the moors of Hexhamshire and near Chatton, and an article on Northumbrian stone circles, complete the volume. This can be bought for £12, whilst back numbers of the journal containing a range of articles – not just on Northumbrian archaeological sites or finds – can also be bought by non-members at a range of prices.

Contact details for NAG, as well as the contents of previous volumes of Northern Archaeology, can be found through these links for their website and Facebook pages.

Events this month
Below the usual listing of all the regular local group lectures still to come this month that we know of. Please let us know an additions to the list to let everyone else know.

7 November – Pagan Viking Burial in Scotland, Dr Colleen Batey [BAS]
9 November – Annual General Meeting and Grimes Graves and the Neolithic Flint Mines of the UK, Pete Topping [NAG]
10 November – Recent excavations at Vindolanda, Marta Alberti [APPLEBY]
12 November – Light without Morris: alternative perspectives on Victorian stained glass, Dr Neil Moat [ARCH & ARCH]
12 November – The Arbeia Society Conference: ‘An Exceptional Construction’: the building of Hadrian’s Wall [ARBEIA]
26 November – Annual Study Day and AGM: The Theban West Bank Tombs: new Research and Directions [NEAES]

The Birley Lectures
The creation of the archaeological past is to be covered in this lecture on Tuesday. All are invited to hear Durham’s own Professor Richard Hingley at this lecture – one of a new series – at Durham.

Durham WHS 30th Events
Also in Durham, though on Wednesday night, is another lecture on the creation of heritage. Like others in the series we’ve publicised earlier in the year this lecture will also cover the challenges – in this case for an area even more remote than the remotest parts of CBA North.
We, of course, cover have two World Heritage Sites – Durham Castle and Cathedral is one, whilst Hadrian’s Wall is part of the Frontiers of the Roman Empire as the other. Might we yet cover a third in the Lake District in 2017?