Tag Archives: survey

CBA North news this week

CBA North News
We’ve a few announcements in this email for you from a variety of sources. Firstly there is a CBA National survey which is anticipated as an up-to-date summary of all local archaeological groups across England and Wales, some further details of the Teesside Archaeological Society, reminders of other events from Appleby to Berwick, via Newcastle and Crookham, this and next month, as well as a note about the forthcoming General Data Protection Regulations.

If you would like to submit anything, or indeed for the next CBA North Committee, please feel free to do so. The contributions and thoughts of all Members and Followers are most welcome at any time.

Much of our admin work behind the scenes over the next few weeks will be preparing things for the General Data Protection Regulations. We will make it as painless and easy for you as possible, but we can’t ignore it as the law.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
27.03.2018

CBA National’s Community Archaeology Survey
CBA North members may remember the work of our former Secretary Suzi Thomas with CBA National back in 2009 and 2010. This provided a baseline of all archaeological groups which was published in 2010. Debbie Frearson, now at CBA National, has written to give us and therefore you details of a fresh survey;

“The Council for British Archaeology (CBA) has launched a survey about archaeology volunteering. We want to find who out takes an active part in community archaeology and what kind of things you get involved with. Most importantly we’d like to know about the kinds of additional support you need to thrive and how the Council for British Archaeology might be able to help you. The last time we asked you about this was 10 years ago and a lot has changed since then! We would appreciate it if you could distribute this email to your members, the survey can be completed by a representative of a group or an individual.

The CBA brings together the interests of a wide range of people and organisations involved with archaeology in the UK. This includes commercial archaeologists, those working in local authorities, museums or other parts of the archaeological heritage sector; universities; community archaeologists and volunteers. We will use the results from the survey, which has been funded by the Headley Trust,  to help shape the work of the CBA over the coming period and better tailor the support we, and others, can offer to community archaeology.

Click here to start the survey https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/CBA_Community_archaeology_2018. The survey closes on Thursday 29 March 2018.

Thank you for your help.

[If you would like a copy of all survey questions so you can discuss and debate your answers between your local group’s committee, please let us know and we’ll see if we can forward one onto you. Since the last survey a number of new local groups have formed, so this survey will be very useful as an up-to-date summary of what is happening and where. Please forward this email or the survey link on to others!].

Tonight’s TAS talk
Teesside Archaeological Society’s monthly talk, tonight, at Stockton is Chris Casswell of DigVentures. He will be talking on a series of excavations across, adjacent and related to sites in CBA North-land. His title is Lindisfarne to Lancaster: Community-based Excavations in the North of England (and a bit of Scotland).

This talk will look at a number of excavations – from a Bronze Age barrow to Medieval village – that have happened, most notably at Lindisfarne, as well as one to come this year in Scotland related to Durham and Lindisfarne. As normal for TAS events this will be at Stockton Library at 7.30.

Other events to come in March and April 2018
As we are in the last week of March and an Easter break close at hand for many here is a quick snapshot of what is happening across CBA North-land from our Events page for the end of March and start of April. Just today we have also have updated this page with all the TAS events planned as well.

28 March – A frontier and community in transition: the Tungrian Vindolanda, Andrew Birley [SOCANTS]

9 April – Durham and the Battle of Dunbar: Identifying Scottish soldiers at Palace Green, Durham, Richard Annis [BAS]
11 April – The Peregrini Project: Excavations on Lindisfarne, Richard Carlton [NAG]
12 April – The Late Iron Age royal site at Stanwick, North Yorkshire: new perspectives, Professor Colin Haselgrove [APPLEBY]

Looking further ahead we also have heard of one group’s 2018 to 2019 programme already!

Further details are through our website pages for the groups, the times and venues of these meetings. We hope you can get along to them!

General Data Protection Regulations
We will shortly be writing to all members about these changes which are very important for how we contact you. This means some changes to our Social Media and Digital Information Policy which was adopted in 2016, which are largely tweaks that Committee are working through.

In the meantime we have some notes from CBA National highlighting what local groups need to do and as a possible template for your group. If there is a demand from our local group members, then we might look to hold a meeting for you on this before the end of May deadline. Let us know if you would be interested in this.

Or if your group ahead of the pack, then let us know so we can highlight your work to others of the CBA North network.

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An A, B and C of archaeology across CBA North

CBA North News

Another month comes, as does another CBA North email. This time round we have another range from across the CBA North region of what is happening and has happened. We take our prompts today from our own initials with announcements for a coffee morning (complete with archaeological display) and a report on the Coniston Copper project for the ‘C’s, an announcement for an Alpine axeheads lecture as well as a note from the Arbeia Society for the ‘A’s.

Where the ‘B’ you might well ask? That is the behind the scenes ‘busy’ that Committee are in preparing such emails, as well as our own events in April and May, for you. We hope that you will also be busy in attending these events of your own and other local groups. Hopefully the next CBA North email will be out to you by this time next week with some further news.

Nonetheless our best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 06.02.2017

TillVAS Coffee Morning
[The weekend coming up has two events; this is the first of the two posters for you – Ed].

The Coniston Copper Project: Penny Rigg
[Members will recall that we put out a call for volunteers for this project during the summer of last year. This article, contributed by Penny Middleton of Northern Archaeological Associates, details the work carried out so far, Ed.]

“In August 2016 local volunteers from the Lake District National Park, working together with specialists from Northern Archaeological Associates (NAA), undertook a survey of the remains of Penny Rigg copper mill, near Coniston (NGR NY 30656 00695). The mill is prime example of a single-phase, medium-sized, ore dressing and processing plant, associated with Tilberthwaite copper mine. The project was funded by the HLF as part of the Coniston Copper Project; a two-year programme administered by the Lake District National Park Authority (LDNPA), which aims to engage the local people in the history and conservation of the areas’ nationally important mining heritage.


The view across the site
 
Tilberthwaite copper mine was first worked under the auspices of the Mines Royal, during the in the Elizabethan period but mined only sporadically after this until taken over by John Barratt, former manager at the nearby Coniston copper mine, in the mid-19th century. Barratt drove a new adit – Horse Crag Level – 1,039 yard (950m) from Penny Rigg to Tilberthwaite to intersect the valuable North Vein. This was intended to improve both transportation and drainage to the mine, and was anticipated to take seven years at a cost of £3,000. However, from the outset the venture was beset with problems, eventually taking 10 years to complete at an undisclosed cost considerably which was significantly over the original initial estimate.
 
Ore from the mine was loaded onto wagons and brought through Horse Level to Penny Rigg, where Barratt and his partners invested in the construction of a new copper mill. Here the ore was sorted, crushed and processed before being sent for smelting. Work on the mill is believed to have begun in 1864 and completed by 1867-68 but it did not remain in operation long, closing soon after the sale of the mine in 1875. The mill later re-opened briefly in the early 1890s, but closed again in 1892, after which the plant was dismantled and the wheel sold for scrap.


The remains of the crushing mill 

Today, the 1.5ha site comprises the semi-ruinous remains a number of buildings – the crusher house and dressing mill, smithy and powder house – as well as various terraces, two settling ponds, leats, holding pond, spoil tips and tracks, all of which are overlain in part by later quarry waste. The entrance to the Horse Crag Level remains visible and the tunnel has recently been cleared by the Cumbria Amenity Trust Mining History Society (CATMHS), although it is unsafe to access without appropriate equipment and supervision. To the north of the site are the expansive remains of Penny Rigg (Horse Crag) quarry, worked commercially since the mid-18th century.


Rectified photographic survey using a total station

The aim of the community survey was twofold. Firstly, to engage local volunteers in the history and conservation of the site through providing practical, hands-on training, and secondly, to prepare a detailed analytical survey (Historic England Level 2/3) of the surface earthworks and structures. The latter was required to inform a subsequent phase of building conservation. A comprehensive record of the complex was made comprising a topographic, earthwork and building survey. The focus was on ensuring the volunteers received a firm grounding in traditional survey skills – plane table, tape and offset – which could be easily transferred to other mining sites in the area. The use of aerial drones, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), reflectorless total station theodolites (REDM), and rectified photography were also demonstrated.
 
A full copy of the report can be downloaded for free from the NAA website, or contact Penny Middleton at pm@naaheritage.com. If you interested in taking part in the Coniston Copper Project then please contact Eleanor Kingston at Eleanor.Kingston@lakedistrict.gov.uk or check the project website at http://www.lakedistrict.gov.uk/learning/archaeologyhistory/coniston-copper for details. Further survey work is planned for March at the site of Low Mill Bonsor for three weeks.


Plane table surveying 1

NAA would like to thank all the volunteers who took part for their enthusiasm and dedication throughout the three-week project. We are also indebted to CBA North and the Archaeological and Architectural Society of Durham and Northumberland for the loan of the plane table, and to Warren Allison and his colleagues at CATMHS for their knowledge, advice and support”.


Plane table survey 2

Local group round-up: The Arbeia Society
Paul Bidwell has sent us this small snippet on The Arbeia Society whose annual conference we publicised last year;

“The Society, apart from its re-enactment group, confines itself at present to arranging the annual conference and its publications, including the Arbeia Journal, but a range of new activities are being planned”.

[We look forward to hearing of those events, Ed.]

Alpine axeheads announcement
[As the second announcement for the weekend coming, here is the poster for the next lecture of our group member the ‘Arch & Arch’. This lecture covers these axes which have been found across Britain and Europe, but will also note their comparative rarity and the science that allows the axes to be traced to source, Ed.].

Other Events This Week
Other events this week also include;

6 February – Celts, Fraser Hunter [BAS]
8 February – Excavations at Hepden Burn and Kyloe Shin, John Nolan and Richard Carlton [CCA]
8 February – Prehistoric Life and Death at Lochinver, Philippa Cockburn [NAG]
9 February – The Prehistoric Origins of the A1(M), Dr Blaise Vyner [APPLEBY]
10 February – The Clayton Archaeological Collection, Frances McIntosh [WCAS]
13 February – The Neolithic in the North-West: What makes this region different?, Gill Hey [LUNESDALE]

Contact details for each of these local societies and groups can be found through our own website pages if you have any questions regarding their times and venues.

Creative archaeology – November in CBA North-land

CBA North News

We apologise for the lateness of this issue in reaching you, but hope that the up to the minute information below is some recompense. In answer to our earlier question for a collective noun of Roman conferences we were quite taken for a “Convivium” suggested by Dave Barter, one of our many Twitter Followers.

This time the theme is ‘creation’ with notice of a recent publication, of objects from Neolithic stone axes to Victorian stained glass within the local group lectures, and the creation of our shared archaeological heritage in the construction of Hadrian’s Wall itself, the development of archaeology from antiquarianism (with reference to ‘The Wall’) as well as for a World Heritage Site and its own unique challenges.

We are gathering materials reviewing the year from local groups – if you would like to send in what your group has been up to please do – as well as looking ahead to 2017 (we already have the programmes of three local groups). These emails tend to be the most widely read, and circulated, of the year (420+ that read the email, whilst 300 viewed the website events page one day and the Twitter notice was circulated to over 16000). So it is well worth a quick note to promote your work to us, everyone else of the other local groups and members of no affiliation other than to CBA North as well.

You could be out almost everyday this week at one or other event that we’ve listed for you here!

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
06.11.2016

Northern Archaeology
The Northumberland Archaeological Group (NAG) have recently published a volume of their journal Northern Archaeology in memory of Ian Colquhoun, well-known regionally and internationally as an expert for the Bronze Age, in particular of metalwork and specifically swords.

This contains a range of articles which CBA North Members and followers might be interested in – two cover Bronze Age swords with one written by Ian from his MA thesis on the findspots of Northumbrian Bronze Age swords and one with a member of his lifelong learning group on a single sword from near Durham. An obituary of Ian and bibliography of his publications are also included.
The results of two landscape surveys on the moors of Hexhamshire and near Chatton, and an article on Northumbrian stone circles, complete the volume. This can be bought for £12, whilst back numbers of the journal containing a range of articles – not just on Northumbrian archaeological sites or finds – can also be bought by non-members at a range of prices.

Contact details for NAG, as well as the contents of previous volumes of Northern Archaeology, can be found through these links for their website and Facebook pages.

Events this month
Below the usual listing of all the regular local group lectures still to come this month that we know of. Please let us know an additions to the list to let everyone else know.

7 November – Pagan Viking Burial in Scotland, Dr Colleen Batey [BAS]
9 November – Annual General Meeting and Grimes Graves and the Neolithic Flint Mines of the UK, Pete Topping [NAG]
10 November – Recent excavations at Vindolanda, Marta Alberti [APPLEBY]
12 November – Light without Morris: alternative perspectives on Victorian stained glass, Dr Neil Moat [ARCH & ARCH]
12 November – The Arbeia Society Conference: ‘An Exceptional Construction’: the building of Hadrian’s Wall [ARBEIA]
26 November – Annual Study Day and AGM: The Theban West Bank Tombs: new Research and Directions [NEAES]

The Birley Lectures
The creation of the archaeological past is to be covered in this lecture on Tuesday. All are invited to hear Durham’s own Professor Richard Hingley at this lecture – one of a new series – at Durham.

Durham WHS 30th Events
Also in Durham, though on Wednesday night, is another lecture on the creation of heritage. Like others in the series we’ve publicised earlier in the year this lecture will also cover the challenges – in this case for an area even more remote than the remotest parts of CBA North.
We, of course, cover have two World Heritage Sites – Durham Castle and Cathedral is one, whilst Hadrian’s Wall is part of the Frontiers of the Roman Empire as the other. Might we yet cover a third in the Lake District in 2017?