Tag Archives: Rock art

Further events this weekend

CBA North News
Some last minute news of further events this weekend that might interest you. If you would like to attend the events organised by the Northumberland National Park on Saturday and Sunday, then you’ll need to book up today.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
13.10.2017

Northumberland National Park events
Northumberland National Park are running a pair of events this weekend. These are;

…and on Sunday there is a guided walk of Lordenshaw and Simonside. Again you will need to book up for this which you can do following this link.

The English Renaissance Herbal and its European Antecedents

On Saturday morning there is another lecture to be held by the Natural History Society of Northumbria. Marie Addyman will talk at 1030 at the Clore Suite, the Great North Museum: Hancock in Newcastle, upon at the centuries of European and English precedents which local man William Turner of Morpeth, the ‘Father of English Botany’, drew upon in his A New Herball of 1551 to 1568.

Turner’s work is considered to be the first herbal in English to give accurate descriptions of the plants listed as well as their medical uses, but he did not invent the genre. This event includes a lecture and exhibition of materials held by the society.

A reminder about Saturday’s Arch & Arch lecture
In case you missed our earlier email with the change in details for the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland’s lecture, a quick reminder with the poster below for the change in details of Saturday afternoon’s lecture is below.

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T’s and U’s for the archaeological alphabet

CBA North News
Our alphabet of archaeology continues with a quick pair of Updates from TillVAS and CITiZAN with news; there are also events listed for this weekend… but we aren’t going to cheat and claim the W just yet!

Our Events page on the website will continue to grow and further events that have come to us from one of our group members to us will be added soon to the page. We’ll gather these up for 2018 (please send us notice of any that you think might of interest to everyone else) and send on all the events that we know of at the start of the year for what is, traditionally, the most widely read and circulated of all our emails.

We hope to send out more news later this week with October’s many events listed.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
26.09.2017

Local group round-up: TillVAS in north Northumberland
Maureen Charlton and Heather Pentland send us another group round-up from the Till Valley Archaeological Society. Excavations have only recently finished at this site, so this – outside of the local parish magazine – is the first news of this excavation outside the area.

They also note the next TillVAS event – to which all are invited – is not long away either.

Events this weekend
This weekend is full of archaeological events – we know of at least six. Here are posters for three.

…and finally, though you’ll have to be quick to book a place for this dayschool.

CITiZAN in CBA North-land during 2017
Megan Clement of the Coastal and Intertidal Zone Archaeological Network (CITiZAN) has sent us a brief note of their work this summer as we covered last year. This year the project’s efforts have concentrated, so far, upon Cumbria. She writes;

“Two events were hosted in Cumbria during the Festival of British Archaeology on the 16th and 17th July, led by CITiZAN North in partnership with Morecambe Bay Partnership. These were CITiZAN app workshops which involved a basic guided walk around a local area whilst updating and adding new records to the CITiZAN dataset. The two sites chosen were Roa Island near Barrow-in-Furness and Bardsea near Ulverston. Several new sites were recording including Rampside Navigation Light, a number of shipwrecks at Roa and anti-tank and anti-glider defences were recorded at Bardsea. In all 10 people attended across the two events and were trained in recording the app and identifying archaeology on the coast and in the intertidal zone.

If you are interested in reading more about the workshop at Roa Island, there is a blog which can be found here. We will be returning to Roa Island in November 2017 as some significant new features were identified and need to have a more in-depth survey carried out.”


A volunteer recording a shipwreck at Roa Island causeway (© CITiZAN)

Megan also writes that there are further training events to come if you are interested;

“There is one in Tyneside and one in Cumbria coming up in October. These are:

1. App Workshop and Guided Walk: North Shields
Friday 6th October at 2.00pm – 4.30pm
Venue Old Low Light Heritage Centre

Come join CITiZAN at the Old Low Light Heritage Centre, in North Shields (Fish Quay NE30 1JA) for an app workshop in how to rapidly record at risk archaeology on the coast. Join us for a short talk and tutorial on the app, a leisurely walk down the north bank of the Tyne recording archaeology. The event is free but places have to be booked here.

2. Training event: Roa Island
Friday 13th and Saturday 14th October 10.00am-4.00pm
Venue to be confirmed but near Roa Island

Join CITiZAN North and Morecambe Bay Partnership at Roa Island, near Barrow-in-Furness to make a permanent archaeological record the remains of a jetty and slipway identified during a workshop in July. These features appear to be part of the former slipway to access Piel Island and part of Piel pier used for travel to Belfast and Douglas. The event is free but places have to be booked for this also.”

Spring into archaeological action this spring!

Now Spring 2016 seems to have arrived why not spring into archaeological action this month?

Events start tonight with the Border Archaeological Society [BAS] on places warmer again with prehistoric rock art in Africa, though the speaker will be familiar to many of CBA North-land already, and this week two more talks on recent Mesolithic and Medieval researches in meetings of the Northumberland Archaeological Group [NAG} and Till Valley Archaeological Society [TillVAS].

Other talks cover the Medieval elsewhere across CBA North-land with Furness Abbey in the southwest of our region covered by the Appleby Archaeological Group [Appleby], though looking further westward again next week, and the week after that a Teesside Archaeological Society talk will deal with Durham University excavations of a castle in Wales,

..and then again other talks cover the area from the lowlands to the hills. Take your pick, attend your own local group meetings and why not something else as well? Our list of things known to us for April is below, but feel free to let us know of any more that you know about or would like to publicise. Details for each of the local groups can be found in our Local Societies and Groups page of the website.

April 2016
4 April – An engraved landscape: rock carvings from the ‘Central Sahara’, Dr Tertia Barnett [BAS]
6 April – Salters Nick – Some Final Conclusions, John Davies [NAG]
6 April – AGM followed by The 2015 Flodden 500 Excavations, Richard Carlton and John Nolan [TILLVAS]
12 April – Furness Abbey and her Daughter Houses: Irish Sea Relations in the Medieval era, Dr Fiona Edmunds [APPLEBY]
19 April – Neven Castle in Pembrokeshire, Dr Chris Caple [TAS]
23 April – Lead mining landscapes and legacies of the North Pennine Uplands, Mark Kincey [ARCH & ARCH]
27 April – The Cosmos, Kant and Thomas Wright of Durham, Andrew Fletcher [SANT]
Date to be confirmed: April – Wetlands in the Neolithic, Dr Kristian Pedersen [CCA]

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee

2016 County Durham Archaeology Day

Tickets can now be booked for the 2016 County Durham Archaeology Day which will be on Saturday March 12th, 2016.

If you would like to book tickets please fill in the form and return it as soon as possible after Monday February 22nd when the tickets go on sale. Please pay by cheque made out to “Durham County Council”.

Yours faithfully,
County Durham Archaeology Team

Border Archaeological Society lectures

The 2016 lectures of the Border Archaeological Society can be found in our regular Events page. They begin for 2016 on Monday next week, 1 February, at the Berwick Parish Centre (opposite Berwick Barracks) at 7.30pm in Berwick. They are also listed for you below as well;

1 February – Antiquarian rubbings to Wemyss Caves 4D: 50 years of documentation of the Pictish carvings in the Wemyss Caves, Fife, Joanna Hambly
7 March – Early Bronze Age Burial Practices in NE England and SE Scotland, Dr Chris Fowler
4 April – An engraved landscape: rock carvings from the ‘Central Sahara’, Dr Tertia Barnett
9 May – The Economy of the Roman Empire: dynamic or stagnant?, Jeremy Paterson
6 June – Young Archaeologists: Newcastle University’s work with the next generation, Dr Jane Webster
5 September – Mortuary Archaeology, Dr Myra Giesen
3 October – [Title to be confirmed], Prof Caroline Wilkinson
7 November – Pagan Viking Burial in Scotland, Dr Colleen Batey
5 December – Mesolithic of Western Scotland and the Mesolithic/Neolithic of SE Europe, Prof Clive Bonsall

Contact details for the group, including their website, can be found in our Local Societies and Groups page.

Field Opportunities

Field Opportunities

Here are some details for upcoming excavations, please see contact details at the end of the email if you are interested!

The two community Archaeology Projects described below are part of the Heart of Teesdale Landscape Partnership scheme and are to be undertaken under the aegis of the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland.  Each one will be managed by staff from an appointed professional archaeological contractor who will supervise the volunteer workforce (maximum of 20 places for each).   Final discussions about the precise dates are underway but both projects will take place in the period late September – end October.

Project outlines:

Brignall Shrunken Medieval Village

The village of Brignall is one of many settlements that underwent a significant reduction in size and prosperity in the later medieval period. What are thought to be traces of former buildings and tofts have been identified on aerial photographs immediately south of the present village. There are a few fields bounded by ditches, but much of the area is disturbed with no set pattern, and no trace of house platforms. At the time of the Domesday survey, Brignall was composed of 12 carucates of land, all waste, but the village must have been of some importance in 1265 to have been granted an annual and weekly market. There were 4 mills in the village in 1712.

The project will consist of geophysical survey followed by targeted trenching to clarify the nature and extent of the remains of the medieval village.  Volunteers can be involved in both elements of the project and will receive training in archaeological excavation, survey, recording and interpretation techniques.

 

Hawkesley Hill Prehistoric Rock Art

Field research by 2000 identified four ‘panels’ of Rock Art at the western edge of Hawkesley Hill, a few miles north-west of Barnard Castle .  The motifs consist variously of cups, rings, grooves, isolated peck marks, and other more heavily eroded features some of which may actually be of natural origin.  There are also a number of earth-fast boulders nearby.

The project will entail the detailed recording of the visible Rock Art features and a search for additional examples in the vicinity both by surface inspection and by excavation.  An area around each of the principal rock outcrops bearing Rock Art will be de-turfed and excavated in order to establish if there are other potentially contemporary archaeological phenomena nearby.  Training in archaeological excavation, survey, recording and interpretation techniques.

 

Please email Belinda Burke at archandarch.dandn@durham.ac.uk

 

Heritage and Science: Working Together in the CARE of Rock Art

Heritage and Science: Working Together in the CARE of Rock Art
A Rock Art Project by Newcastle University and Queen’s University Belfast by Peter Lewis, Newcastle University

The project aims to coproduce a tool kit and management guide that will enable experts and non-experts alike to monitor the condition of open-air rock art or rock carvings, and implement simple management techniques to aid with their long term preservation. The guide is being developed in light of our on-going scientific analysis of the causes of rock art decay. Our initial results suggest that the rate of decay of rock art has increased rapidly over the last several decades.
http://www.ncl.ac.uk/press.office/press.release/item/ancient-art-at-risk-warn-experts

This work may also be applicable to other open-air natural stone monuments in your area, so all contributions are welcome, even if as yet there is no known rock art in your region.

Both the toolkit and management guide are being coproduced with heritage professionals (like yourselves), end users (land owners, farmers etc.), rock art enthusiasts and non-experts (volunteers) in order to ensure they are practical, usable and straightforward.

With a successful adoption the data will be collected from rock art sites across the UK by a wide variety of people including landowners and the public.

As with most heritage conservation strategies, it is vital to have the buy in from Local Government Archaeology Officers.  We would like to open a discussion on how the to organise/implement the transfer and keeping of condition data collected through using the toolkit. To this end, we have created a discussion forum. This is hosted on a secure LGA website and some of you may already be registered on the site. It is quick and simple to register and find the group (by searching “rock art”). It can also be found at the following URL:
https://knowledgehub.local.gov.uk/group/scienceandheritageworkingtogetherinthecareofrockart

We are going to focus our efforts particularly on this collaboration over the next six months with regular updates and information. Please join the discussion!

Initially we would like to start a discussion on the following points:

1. Do you currently provide any guidance to managers/owners of open-air rock art? Or have suggestions on guidance, such as a “dos and don’ts” list?
2. Is there any feedback you would give on the toolkit and management guide outline?
3. Would your organisation, or the HER if you are a Local Government Archaeology Officer, be the best people to store the toolkit data? If no, who would you suggest as an alternate keeper of this information?
4. How do you think you would use and distribute the final resources when they are released in January 2014?

Please respond to these at the above URL.

Both your initial feedback and subsequent contributions on the discussion board
are greatly appreciated and necessary for the success of this project.

Please email heritagescience@ncl.ac.uk or visit
http://research.ncl.ac.uk/heritagescience if you are interested in further
information.