Tag Archives: Prehistoric

Free Access to Routledge Archaeology publications

CBA North Members will already have been sent this this (as a benefit of membership), so for CBA North’s Followers might also be interested in this offer in case people haven’t already seen it with lots available for sites and finds across CBA North-land.

CBA North note that there are of course lots of good things to read in printed form as well with the libraries of local societies as well when this offer closes as well, but in the meantime…

Routledge Archaeology, Heritage, Museum Studies and Conservation

From 4th-17th April 2016 you can access our Archaeology, Heritage, Museum Studies and Conservation journals for FREE*. There is no need to sign-up or register, simply click the links below and start reading today!

Discover our Archaeology journals

Explore our Heritage, Museum Studies and Conservation journals

*This exclusive offer is only available via this page between 4th-17th April 2016 and to post-1997 content only.

If you are using Google Chrome please ensure you have the latest version in order to read these journals.

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Spring into archaeological action this spring!

Now Spring 2016 seems to have arrived why not spring into archaeological action this month?

Events start tonight with the Border Archaeological Society [BAS] on places warmer again with prehistoric rock art in Africa, though the speaker will be familiar to many of CBA North-land already, and this week two more talks on recent Mesolithic and Medieval researches in meetings of the Northumberland Archaeological Group [NAG} and Till Valley Archaeological Society [TillVAS].

Other talks cover the Medieval elsewhere across CBA North-land with Furness Abbey in the southwest of our region covered by the Appleby Archaeological Group [Appleby], though looking further westward again next week, and the week after that a Teesside Archaeological Society talk will deal with Durham University excavations of a castle in Wales,

..and then again other talks cover the area from the lowlands to the hills. Take your pick, attend your own local group meetings and why not something else as well? Our list of things known to us for April is below, but feel free to let us know of any more that you know about or would like to publicise. Details for each of the local groups can be found in our Local Societies and Groups page of the website.

April 2016
4 April – An engraved landscape: rock carvings from the ‘Central Sahara’, Dr Tertia Barnett [BAS]
6 April – Salters Nick – Some Final Conclusions, John Davies [NAG]
6 April – AGM followed by The 2015 Flodden 500 Excavations, Richard Carlton and John Nolan [TILLVAS]
12 April – Furness Abbey and her Daughter Houses: Irish Sea Relations in the Medieval era, Dr Fiona Edmunds [APPLEBY]
19 April – Neven Castle in Pembrokeshire, Dr Chris Caple [TAS]
23 April – Lead mining landscapes and legacies of the North Pennine Uplands, Mark Kincey [ARCH & ARCH]
27 April – The Cosmos, Kant and Thomas Wright of Durham, Andrew Fletcher [SANT]
Date to be confirmed: April – Wetlands in the Neolithic, Dr Kristian Pedersen [CCA]

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee

Natural History Society of Northumbria lecture: Quaternary Fluvial Archives: a new paradigm

On Friday 29 January, 7pm-8pm, at the Great North Museum: Hancock in Newcastle, Professor Dave Bridgeland will lecture on work over the past few decades which has pulled together geological and geomorphological records from rivers in the Quaternary Period that show interesting patterns of similarity and difference, which can be related to climate, its zonation and fluctuation, and to crustal provinces. Quaternary ice ages have influenced our landscape far beyond the immediate reach of the ice sheets themselves.

David Bridgland is a Professor in the Department of Geography at Durham University, with research interests in Quaternary environmental change and fluvial history, with reference to palaeontology and archaeology. Until recently he was President of the Geologist’s Association.

The lectures of the Natural History Society of Northumbria are usually held every Friday evening, starting at 7pm, in the learning suite on the ground floor of the Great North Museum: Hancock. The museum is closed to the public at this time, so entry is via both side entrances.

Entry is from 6.20pm and tea, coffee and biscuits are available and the opportunity to socialise. Speakers give an illustrated presentation for 45mins-1 hour and then open the floor for questions and discussions.

Non-members are very welcome to attend but we ask that they kindly make a donation on the night to support these lectures. Further details of the lecture programme can be found at http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/activities-ttea.php.

Field Opportunities

Field Opportunities

Here are some details for upcoming excavations, please see contact details at the end of the email if you are interested!

The two community Archaeology Projects described below are part of the Heart of Teesdale Landscape Partnership scheme and are to be undertaken under the aegis of the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland.  Each one will be managed by staff from an appointed professional archaeological contractor who will supervise the volunteer workforce (maximum of 20 places for each).   Final discussions about the precise dates are underway but both projects will take place in the period late September – end October.

Project outlines:

Brignall Shrunken Medieval Village

The village of Brignall is one of many settlements that underwent a significant reduction in size and prosperity in the later medieval period. What are thought to be traces of former buildings and tofts have been identified on aerial photographs immediately south of the present village. There are a few fields bounded by ditches, but much of the area is disturbed with no set pattern, and no trace of house platforms. At the time of the Domesday survey, Brignall was composed of 12 carucates of land, all waste, but the village must have been of some importance in 1265 to have been granted an annual and weekly market. There were 4 mills in the village in 1712.

The project will consist of geophysical survey followed by targeted trenching to clarify the nature and extent of the remains of the medieval village.  Volunteers can be involved in both elements of the project and will receive training in archaeological excavation, survey, recording and interpretation techniques.

 

Hawkesley Hill Prehistoric Rock Art

Field research by 2000 identified four ‘panels’ of Rock Art at the western edge of Hawkesley Hill, a few miles north-west of Barnard Castle .  The motifs consist variously of cups, rings, grooves, isolated peck marks, and other more heavily eroded features some of which may actually be of natural origin.  There are also a number of earth-fast boulders nearby.

The project will entail the detailed recording of the visible Rock Art features and a search for additional examples in the vicinity both by surface inspection and by excavation.  An area around each of the principal rock outcrops bearing Rock Art will be de-turfed and excavated in order to establish if there are other potentially contemporary archaeological phenomena nearby.  Training in archaeological excavation, survey, recording and interpretation techniques.

 

Please email Belinda Burke at archandarch.dandn@durham.ac.uk

 

Festival of Archaeology 2015: The Great North Archaeology Event

The Great North archaeology event

Sat 25th Jul 2015

Come to the Great North Museum: Hancock and meet the expert curators and handle museum artefacts from prehistoric Britain. You will also be able to work with the learning team to make a prehistoric shelter to take home and try your hand at designing rock using clay.

See the following for more information, including directions:

http://www.archaeologyfestival.org.uk/events/1939

www.twmuseums.org.uk/great-north-museum.html

Swaledale Museum Lecture

The Friends of the Swaledale Museum will be holding a talk by Tim Laurie entitled “The Prehistoric Roundhouse in Swaledale”  on 24th June as part of their Lost Buildings of Swaledale Programme.

See www.swaag.org/events.php for further details.

Friends £3, visitors £4, booking recommended

Friends of Swaledale Museum Talks

Friends of Swaledale Museum Talks.

The next talk organised by the Friends of Swaledale Museums is on Wednesday 24th June and entitled ‘The Prehistoric Round House in Swaledale’, the speaker is Tim Laurie.

See http://www.swaledalemuseum.org/whatson.html for further details, including  details of future talks.