Tag Archives: Northumbria

Events & Exhibitions in May & June across CBA North-land

CBA North News
Apologies for the delay in sending you further news of events across CBA North-land for May and June. As you will see it is something of a bumper issue with many different events coming up soon. Another similarly-sized email is already in preparation with yet more events and announcements to come. Some of these events will bring up-to-date findings from recent research and projects following on from previous emails to you, some deal with new topics different again. For some of these events you will need to book up.

As many of you will know the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) will take effect soon. We will be emailing everyone on what GDPR means for us to hold and process your information, and more importantly for you to continue to receive CBA North news and information. Further details for these will appear in time on the CBA North website as well to accord with these regulations. However if you you have any immediate questions, please feel free to let us know of them.

Once again, if you would like to submit anything on your local group’s recent activities or plans for this summer, please let us know. Keep an eye to our Events page on the website for any additions to the regular talks and lectures of various groups across the CBA North region. Additions to this page are made throughout the year as we know of them.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
13.05.2018

Events this week
1) Border Archaeological Society lecture: Finding a Lost Lindisfarne Estate 
There are a number of events coming up this week. These are located in all parts of our region, they start tomorrow night at Berwick with the next of the Border Archaeological Society’s [BAS] lectures. Josie McChrystal, their Secretary, gives us some more details of what promises to be an interesting talk.

Josie informs us that;

“In the early years, the Lindisfarne monastery built up a huge land holding in Northumberland and southern Scotland but in the troubled times of the Viking era some of these lands were taken away from them. Later writers referred to these lands without knowing much about them. We will discover one of these estates in mid-Northumberland on Monday evening.  

The renowned archaeologist Colm O’Brien will be the speaker on this occasion. He has excavated in Northumberland and taught at the universities of Newcastle and Sunderland. He is especially interested in the Age of Bede and now, in retirement, he co-directs the Bernician Studies Group, a community learning group with projects in Northumberland and in County Donegal in Ireland.

As ever, the lecture begins at 7.30 at Berwick Parish Church Hall (Holy Trinity) off The Parade, TD15 1DF. Please tell your family and friends about what promises to be a very interesting evening. All are welcome”.

2) The First World War in the Tees Valley Conference
Dave Errickson, Chair of Teesside Archaeological Society [TAS] one of our group members, has let us know of another event. Members will remember our previous note of our Home Front Legacy workshop in 2015 which highlighted ways groups could look out for and record First World War sites. In contrast to Lindisfarne and the north of our region, this concentrates upon these more modern sites in the south of our region and includes work carried out by the TAS group and others on Teesside recording them. All the talks in this free conference relate to the First World War in some way. The conference is in Middlesbrough and on Saturday this week, but you will need to book places for this. They can be obtained from this Eventbrite page here.

3) North East Ancient Egypt Society lecture: Tell Timai and its Terracotta Figures
Also on Saturday, but in Newcastle, is also the next lecture of the North East Ancient Egypt Society on something different again.

The first Tyne and Wear Archaeology Day
Jennifer Morrison, Tyne and Wear Archaeological Officer, has sent us details of the first Tyne and Wear Archaeology Day which is coming up soon in next month on Saturday, 16 June.

Again you will need to book and again this is a fully packed day. However in this case, whilst all are from the Tyne and Wear area, the talks cover a range of topics including;

– Prehistoric settlements found at East Wideopen and West Shiremoor in North Tyneside
– Roman industrial remains found at Dorcas Avenue in Benwell
– The Roman Wallquest Community Archaeology Project at Benwell, Wallsend (including the newly discovered Roman baths) and South Shields
– Industrial archaeology of the Newcastle Pottery found at Pottery Lane/Forth Banks, Newcastle
– Industrial Archaeology of Ambrose Crowley’s Ironworks at Swalwell in Gateshead
– Crypt Archaeology and human remains found under a former Bethel Chapel in Villiers Street, Sunderland
– World War Two and Cold War Archaeology at Blakelaw and Kenton Bunkers

To book places details are given in the poster or through clicking the link here. In a fully packed day. Jennifer notes that “Most of the archaeological projects which will be discussed have been funded by developers through the planning process, and the aim of the day is to pass on the results of these exciting excavations to local residents”.

Following on from previous emails…
1) The next Dig Deeper talk

Previous CBA North emails have announced talks on forensics and facial reconstruction, as well as osteoarchaeology, for the meetings of various groups. The next Dig Deeper talk at Durham, later this month, will discuss some of the new approaches to looking at and recording old bones – sometimes at a distance to the original samples. 

2) Bodies of Evidence: How science unearthed Durham’s dark secret
Also bone-related our last email carried information about a talk on the Scottish soldiers from the 1650 Battle of Dunbar who had died and been buried at Durham by Richard Annis, once again at Berwick to the Border Archaeological Society in April. Andrew Millard, also of Durham University and involved with the Scottish Soldiers project, has written to us a bit more about the forthcoming exhibition and events associated with that project.

He writes on behalf of the project team in an update to April’s talk with what planned for this summer;

“This exhibition shows how the latest scientific techniques have revealed the soldiers’ story – how they lived, why they died, and what became of those who survived.

Their skeletons were discovered during excavations in Durham in November 2013 and, for the first time, visitors to Palace Green Library will come face to face with a 3D reconstruction of the face of one of these men in the exhibition. The exhibition also tells the story of those survivors who were transported across the Atlantic to the edge of the known world. These men lived to have families and we are proud to have connected with many descendants, and we hope that descendants will be able to visit us and the exhibition in Durham this summer.

Running alongside the exhibition will be a programme of events, including family activities, public lectures, and the new production Woven Bones from Cap-a-Pie theatre company. The play will tell the story of the Scottish soldiers, and will tour venues along the route marched from Dunbar to Durham. Details of the production can be found on the Cap-a-Pie website.

Key highlights of this programme of events so far include:

– 18th June: Evening gallery opening with Professor Chris Gerrard, Project Lead for the Scottish Soldiers Archaeology Project
– 30th July: Evening lecture by Dr David Caldwell, President of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland
– 13th August: Evening lecture by Professor Caroline Wilkinson, Director of Face Lab, Liverpool John Moores University, which produced the facial reconstruction
– 3rd September: Evening lecture by Arran Johnston, Founding Director of the Scottish Battlefields Trust

The Scottish Soldiers Archaeology Project Team would be delighted to welcome descendants to the exhibition and would be pleased to arrange private tours with members of the Team, so please do let us know if you are planning a visit by emailing Scottish.soldiers@durham.ac.uk. We recognise that Durham is a long way to travel for many of you, and so we are developing a small sister touring exhibition which will visit venues in the United States. More information about this touring exhibition will be made available in due course.

Further details and more events will be announced soon. Visit our website to find out more about the exhibition.

A book documenting the archaeology of the discovery, the process of analysis, and the history of the Scottish soldiers, including stories of the survivors, has also been produced by the Project Team and will be available in the coming months. Visit Oxbow Books to find out more about the book here.

We hope to see you this summer.

Kind regards,

The Scottish Soldiers Archaeology Project Team & Exhibition Curatorial Team”.

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Morecambe Bay training tomorrow and woodland archaeo-wanders

CBA North News

Our latest issue once again spans the variety of the CBA North region – this is not quite the last email of 2016 to you, as a further one is to come yet. Today’s issue has some last minute news of some training tomorrow and two further round-ups from local groups. (There is no system in play here – we move from the A of Appleby’s in the last issue to B’s this time with Bernicia and Border).

Again we span the geographical expanse of our region from Morecambe Bay in our southwest to the northeast in Northumberland for the varied field-based and recording work by the Bernician Studies Group, as well hearing what Berwick-based lectures the Border Archaeological Group have been enjoying during 2016 and what their members can look forward to 2017.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
19.12.2016

Morecambe Bay: training tomorrow (and other dates)
[Louise Brown of the Morecambe Bay Partnership has written to us giving details of some further training events with one tomorrow. You will recall that previous training has been in geophysical surveying carried out as part of the same project during the summer. Please contact Louise if you would like any further details, Ed.]

Hello,

As part of the Headlands to Headspace Landscape Partnership Scheme, currently being delivered by Morecambe Bay Partnership, we have arranged some further free training in documentary research for volunteers. The workshops have been organised for Kendal (20th December, 10th and 17th January), Arnside (7th and 14th January) and Barrow (28th January and 4th February). The training is hosted by Dr Richard Newman of Wardell Armstrong Archaeology (formerly the Cumbria County Archaeologist), is Bay themed and will introduce research techniques for desk-based archaeological study. We hope to get volunteers to contribute to desk-based reports focused on specific themes/topics as part of the training.

The link to our website for further information and booking a free place can be found here:

http://www.morecambebay.org.uk/events/understanding-bay-documentary-research-training

Kind regards
Louise Martin
H2H Cultural Heritage Officer
Morecambe Bay Partnership

Mobile: 07760881581
Office: 01539 734888
Follow us on Twitter: @H2H_Tweets

Local group round-up 1; If you go down to the woods today…
…but not for a picnic, you may learn about a possible ancient Northumbrian woodland boundary zone. Members of the Bernician Studies Group are looking at an area between Wansbeck and Coquet in Northumberland. We call the study Cocwudu, a name recorded in the History of Saint Cuthbert at the end of the 11th century. The word seems to be a re-formation of the river-name Coquet and Old English wudu, meaning woodland.

Place name elements such as Old English hryst, leah, sceaga and wudu, as in Coquetdale at Morrelhirst, Horsley, Lordenshaw and Witton, provide clues of a long-gone forested area.

During the last two years, members have checked many likely locations for plants which indicate ancient semi-natural woodland. We are noting the common ones such as Wood Anemone and Dog’s Mercury, and rarer ones such as Herb Paris and Toothwort. Most of these woodlands only survive in outlying places, along steep and inaccessible sides of streams and rivers. We look for evidence of woodland management in the past, such as pollarding and coppicing.

We are also studying historic township boundaries using the 1860s Ordnance Survey maps at the Literary and Philosophical Society library in Newcastle. We are also looking at the Brinkburn and Newminster Cartularies for evidence of Medieval arable and animal management, forests and hunting. Some members have been translating selected charters from Latin into English. Experts associated with Newcastle and Durham universities are guiding the work.

The Bernician Studies Group is closely associated with Explore, the Newcastle-based independent lifelong learning programme. Explore offers an exciting range of classes and lectures in philosophy, art, history and archaeology, literature, science and more, which are open to all. Their spring programme starts on 16th January 2017.

More information on the group can be found at www.bernicianstudies.eu.

Bridget Gubbins and the Bernician Studies Group
12.12.2016

Local group round-up 2; Border Archaeological Society
BAS have enjoyed an excellent programme of lectures during 2016. Beginning with Joanna Hambly, we learned about 150 years of documentation of the Pictish carvings at Weymss Caves before Chris Fowler of Newcastle University described Early Bronze Age Burial Practices in North East England and South East Scotland. We then had a tour of the Sahara with Tertia Barnett who spoke of the rock carvings to be found there. She was followed by Jeremy Paterson who described the Roman economy. Our last speaker before the summer break was Dr Jane Webster, founder of a Young Archaeologists Club in Newcastle speaking about the University’s work with young people. This was especially pertinent now that A-level Archaeology is to be a thing of the past*.

In September, Myra Giesen spoke about Mortuary Archaeology. She was followed by Elidh Ferguson of the Face Lab at Liverpool Sir John Moores University, stepping in admirably for Professor Caroline Wilkinson, who held the audience enthralled as she described how facial images are reconstructed from the skull*. Colleen Batey spoke with great knowledge and enthusiasm about Pagan Viking Burial in November. Professor Clive Bonsall wound up this year’s lecture series with a talk on his work on Mesolithic shell middens on the east coast of Scotland in the “Obanian Problem”.

In 2017, we welcome Fraser Hunter and Andrew Birley talking about the Celts and Vindolanda respectively. They are followed by Tatiana Ivleva talking about Iron Age and Roman period glass bangles. The following three talks are on local topics: Paul Gething on Bradford Kaims, Jenny Proctor on Needle’s Eye and Ian Kille on how the local geology has shaped its history. Andrea Dolfini will speak on reconstructed Bronze Age fighting styles followed by Richard Carlton on recent discoveries on Lindisfarne. Our President, Lindsay Allason-Jones somewhat enigmatically, will wind up the programme by asking whether Hadrian’s Wall is archaeological site or an artistic muse.

Josie McChrystal and the Border Archaeological Society
14.12.2016

[*As footnotes to this review, CBA North Members and Followers will recall that we earlier sent round notice of a petition for the reprieve of A-Level Archaeology during October; this was recently debated in Parliament, but the subject is not safe yet, see https://www.change.org/p/aqa-save-a-level-archaeology for an update. Furthermore the recent facial reconstruction of Robert the Bruce reported in the media – see https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/dec/08/sprucing-up-robert-the-bruce-scottish-kings-face-gets-3d-treatment – was carried out using the techniques described in the lecture. All of which shows the value of local groups and their lectures, Ed.]

Further Contributions
[If others or other groups would like to contribute something to our newsletter emails please do so and send something in. Contributions are edited as little as possible and can include a few choice pictures – we don’t have to run in alphabetical order for the local round-up’s of the local groups – and we’ll publicise all the events known to us at the start of the New Year which is by tradition our most widely read email and circulated website page, Ed.]

TillVAS: James IV Memorial Lecture

TillVAS: James IV Memorial Lecture

The “James IV Memorial Lecture” entitled “The King in the North – the life and times of Oswald of Northumbria” will be held at 2.30pm in Etal Village Hall on Sunday 11th October.

The speaker will be Max Adams, author of the book of that title.
This is a ticketed event, £5 each, and can be obtained from Maureen Charlton, East Flodden Cottage, Milfield,, NE71 6JF on receipt of a cheque (payable to TillVAS) and a SAE.

Northumbria Gardens Trust Study Day

Streatlam Castle Estate Study Day

On Sunday 21st June the Northumbria Gardens Trust (NGT) is having a study day at the Streatlam Castle estate, courtesy of the estate owner, Capt Nigel Pease.

Please click ngt_-_streatlam_study_day_-_flyer[1]  for further information and booking details.