Tag Archives: North Yorkshire

CBA North: End of August/Start of September news

CBA North News
This issue of CBA North news has been slightly delayed. However, we hope that you find it worth the wait. We have a report of the recent Hadrian’s Wall Pilgrimage, which happens only one every 10 years, and a round-up of recent years by one of our local group members.

In addition the usual listing of events to come with the change in month soon – the sharp-eyed will notice changes to this and our Events website page as we are told of those changes for September and other months, we also have a further article on archaeological creativity and notice of an event from our sister organisation CBA North West.

We hope you that you enjoy and that you might contribute something, perhaps of your own local group’s activities this summer?, that you think that others might enjoy or should know of for our next issue.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee,
25.08.2019

Remaining August 2019 Events
28 August – The Past Beneath the Lawns; current excavations at Auckland Castle, John Castling and Chris Gerrard [SOCANTS]

September 2019 Events
2 September – Whitby Abbey, Tony Wilmott [BAS]
4 September – The Bowl Hole Cemetery at Bamburgh, Graeme Young [TILLVAS]
14 September – Mapping the Khandaq Shapur: One of the Great Barriers of the Ancient World [ARCH & ARCH]
24 September – title to be announced, Dr Ben Roberts [TAS]
25 September – (Re)Discovering Ava: the Achavanich Beaker Burial project, Maya Hoole [SOCANTS]

The 2019 Hadrian’s Wall Pilgrimage – done with stile!
It was rather unkindly and harshly said that we know all we need to of Hadrian’s Wall sometime ago. However excavations, surveys and other researches have continued on and at a pace. Sometimes a stock-take is useful and the Hadrian’s Wall Pilgrimage is one such opportunity. We asked Bill Griffiths to explain all on the pilgrimage, and you will see why there isn’t a typo in the article title. He writes;

‘The first pilgrimage of Hadrian’s Wall took place in 1849, attended by 24 people under the direction of the Reverend Collingwood Bruce. The second pilgrimage occurred in 1886 when it began a decennial tradition. Since 1949 it has taken place in the last year of the decade.

The 14th Pilgrimage took place over 20th to 28th July 2019 and saw 218 Pilgrims, in four coaches, traverse the wall over eight days, looking in particular at some of the new discoveries and research questions of the last 10 years. The Pilgrims came from across the UK and Europe and as far afield as the USA and China.


The 2019 Pilgrims following a lunchtime reception at South Shields Town Hall, who displayed the flags of the majority of nations represented on the Pilgrimage.

Each coach had a pair of guides, each an acknowledged expert on the Wall. Pilgrims were encouraged to change coach each day to get different perspectives from different guides.


Nick Hodgson, President of the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle and one of the coach guides, explaining the fort at Chesters.

Organised by the two learned societies of Hadrian’s Wall, the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne and the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society, the Pilgrimage is five years in the planning. The committee, led by the Chief Pilgrim David Breeze, pores over every detail, from the hotels, to the menus for receptions, to considering whether we will need additional portaloos at key sites.

In the midst of this a handbook has been created for the Pilgrimage, with contributions from experts along the length of the Wall setting out the new advances of the last decade. It has been complied by Dr Rob Collins of Newcastle University and Dr Matt Symonds, editor of Current World Archaeology. Such a volume has been produced for the last three Pilgrimages, beginning with the volume produced in 1999 under Paul Bidwell, and each marks a significant contribution to Hadrian’s Wall studies in its own right. Copies are available from either of the Societies, and can also be found at several of the museum shops along the Wall.


The ‘twin’ compliers of the Pilgrimage handbook Matt and Rob.

The week included on site tours, receptions and walks along sections of the Wall. Much thought goes in to attempting to keep the Pilgrims safe. This year the Pilgrims were granted access to walk a section of the vallum, not usually accessible to the public, between Carrawburgh Roman Fort and Limestone Corner. However, this necessitated getting the Pilgrims across the Military Road at a very fast section of the road. The steering group thought hard about this, with Graeme Stobbs, our lead for Health and Safety, providing the solution. He designed a wooden stile for the event, to get Pilgrims over the field wall opposite Limestone Corner and the two of us, resplendent in hi viz jackets, marshalled the pilgrims to cross the road, with Graeme deploying a green or red flag according to whether the road was clear enough for us to release Pilgrims across it. Anyone who has led a tour knows how hard it is to marshal people to cross roads safely. However, the theatre of the flags worked well, with only a recalcitrant few daring to try and cross under their own initiative! At the end of the day they were all brought across alive – job done.


The Pilgrimage stile, with Graeme Stobbs poised and ready to prevent the Pilgrims throwing themselves in front of cars!

The Pilgrimage is a unique event in every way, not least for the melting pot of people who constitute the Pilgrims, who range from dedicated Wall specialists to curious members of the public who have not visited the frontier before. The discussions held over the week are truly stimulating for all concerned.

So – here’s to the next one in 2029, planning will start in 2024 (gulp!)’.

Bill Griffiths – Pilgrimage Secretary

The Northern Archaeology Group grasps volunteering opportunities
It is a while since we’ve had a local group round-up and heard something from our group member the Northern Archaeology Group, so we asked Phil Carter to review what the group has been up to lately. Here Phil notes how a small group, with its own small projects, has also been engaged with a number of larger ones again. He writes;

‘In addition to our own on-going Roman roads research & fieldwork, and of course our two divers investigating the river crossings and associated votive deposits at Piercebridge, the Northern Archaeology Group also has members who have regularly volunteered on the long-running and prestigious excavations at Vindolanda and Binchester Roman fort sites. They have continued to do that, but with the advent of NLHF funded local community archaeology projects along came the opportunity to look at other, new, initiatives to broaden our field-based experience. Thinking how good that had proved, I thought it might be of interest to CBA North readers to see the extent volunteers from a local group can contribute to archaeological investigations here in the North East of England whilst we aren’t formal group partners in such projects. I have chosen a selection of the community archaeology projects we have worked on in recent years to give you a flavour of what’s out there and what can be achieved.

A few years back a hardy core of us worked on the 3-year Hadrian’s WallQuest community project run by Tyne and Wear Archaeology and Museums. On that we were fortunate enough to excavate on such key sites as the Roman Military Way, vallum & vicus at Benwell, the north defensive ditch of the Wall at Albemarle Barracks and the fort ditch/vicus at Arbeia. We then turned our attention to Wallsend to locate, dig and expose the actual bathhouse remains at Segedunum. And as a final hurrah it was particularly gratifying to re-dig a section of the nearby Wall. It’s fair to say that was a fantastic project to be involved in.

Hadrian’s WallQuest: the (actual) bathhouse remains we helped find at Wallsend.

Following on from that a few of us signed-up to work with the Auckland Castle Trust (now The Auckland Project) community project where with Archaeological Services Durham University (ASDU) we investigated the 18th century walled garden prior to its planned redevelopment. We revealed remains of the early dated pinery & vinery complex created by the Bishops of Durham. It was very different and very interesting. Next we were back at Auckland Castle with a call to excavate an area adjacent to the Scotland Wing in advance of groundworks. ASDU were again the on-site team and supervised the volunteers. We were astonished to find a well-preserved section of the early medieval curtain wall, associated buildings, fine carved window tracery and a Tudor-era kitchen range with three intact hearths. We have since investigated important early chapel remains and more of the curtain wall & service buildings. It’s fair to say we weren’t expecting all of that at all! And continuing work with that Project, this time overseen by Northern Archaeological Associates, we are currently helping to excavate the northeast gate area of Binchester Roman fort, investigating both the early fort rampart there & later fort roadway.


Auckland Castle : a surviving section of the Medieval curtain-wall being revealed.

Closer to home (we are based near Chester-le-Street) something very close to our heart was the Sunderland’s Forgotten Stones community project. The Northern Archaeology Group has long sought to discover Roman Sunderland and we have investigated various sites and evidence for that presence, particularly at Hylton where the Group strongly believe there was some sort of Roman bridge structure in the River Wear. Back in 1999 we published a small booklet and a CD outlining our case and always wanted to undertake some trial trenches there but the opportunity never presented itself. So, it was terrific to learn that Castletown Neighbourhood Action Group was seeking assistance from the then HLF to explore just that. They wanted to investigate the site of where many large ‘briggstones’ were removed from the river bed at Hylton in the 1860s and shipped down to the mouth of the river where a good number can still be seen. Knowing of our keen interest in all this they sought our support from the outset. The project secured the services of Wardell Armstrong to oversee the archaeological investigations. The volunteer workforce did a dig on the river foreshore at South Hylton. This proved challenging as we could only dig at low tide.  We cleaned off a spread of large worked stone blocks & wood, and then put a section through to help establish its construction.  Wardell’s view was that without any material dating evidence, and with a similar build style to a lot of the river quayside, it was probably of 17th or 18th century construction. Later local diver Gary Bankhead was in the water to video some very large worked stone blocks underwater on the river bed close to the opposite bank. They need investigating more. A couple of months later we then moved over to North Hylton to investigate a large parch mark in a pasture field. Excavation found ditches and wall foundations related to a post-medieval farm house. Nothing Roman came to light.


Sunderland’s Forgotten Stones: working on the river foreshore at South Hylton.

Travelling to the south of the region some of us volunteered to help out on the River Tees Re-discovered community archaeology project at two locations. Tees Archaeology were running a dig at Piercebridge village to explore features shown up on a geophysical survey northwest of the roman fort. A number of trenches were opened and investigations concluded they were probably Roman-era trackways. Dalton-on-Tees was the next target, to investigate an extensive earthwork feature that came to light on a Lidar survey. In two trenches the associated ditches of the earthwork were revealed, one having a single piece of Roman mortaria. In a third trench well preserved wall foundations of a Medieval house with evidence of occupation was found sitting on the earthwork mound.


River Tees Rediscovered: wall foundations of a Medieval house come to light.

To summarise; you can see we have been very fortunate to volunteer on a wide range of projects covering different localities and different eras. We have forged valuable relationships with the project leads, the contractor archaeology teams and other volunteer groups. If you want to dig there’s lots out there to get involved in, and CBA North is a great source of information. Local groups and societies don’t have to have their own projects at all’.

Phil Carter, Secretary, Northern Archaeology Group.

Creative Archaeological Continued: Art and Archaeology at Aldborough Roman Town
In one of our earlier emails we had one of our own members describe their creativity inspired by archaeology, and in our earlier emails again Dere Street events and projects have been covered. Rose Ferraby and Rob St. John have combined the two in Soundmarks to find overlaps and resonances between art and archaeology at Aldborough. This is something that is geographically ‘just at the end of the road’, but still running till the end of the month. They write;

‘Beneath the quiet streets and farmland of the North Yorkshire village of Aldborough lies the Roman town of Isurium Brigantum. Recent work by the Aldborough Roman Town Project has revealed that it was a town of great importance in the Roman north; a key trading point and busy hub. It was a busy town with a central forum and basilica, large town houses, warehouses and workshops, an amphitheatre and large suburbs.


Rob and Rose at Aldborough Roman Town, North Yorkshire, pictured by Mario Cruzado.

Visiting Aldborough today, this rich history is not always immediately obvious [as above]. This year, a collaboration spanning art, sound and archaeology has explored and documented Aldborough’s hidden sub-surface landscape, leading to an art exhibition and sound installation and a series of public events in August 2019.


Recording at the Roman amphitheatre above Aldborough, pictured by Mario Cruzado.

Soundmarks is a collaboration between us, funded by Arts Council England. An exhibition of our work will be held at The Shed, Aldborough, between Saturday 24th August and Saturday 31st August.

A free ‘art trail’ will be launched alongside the exhibition, allowing the public to navigate eight ‘soundmark’ sites through the village. Each soundmark is located on an important Roman site – such as the Forum, amphitheatre and river – and will be accessed either using a free interactive mobile app, or using a paper map distributed through the village.


Village Green by Rose Ferraby, Soundmarks 2019.

At each soundmark, visitors can view Rose’s visual work and listen to Rob’s sound work, each interpreting the character and history of the site. The soundmark trail – which takes around an hour to walk in full – is designed to encourage people to explore Aldborough’s unique landscape, and to gain new perspectives on its rich Roman history.

At The Shed, visitors can view Rose’s original visual works and listen to an immersive ambient sound piece created by Rob using the sounds of Aldborough, and produced using compositional cues from archaeological techniques, datasets and maps. Two invited guest speakers – Dr. Lesley McFadyen, an archaeologist from Birkbeck, University of London, and Dr. Jos Smith, an environmental landscape writer from the University of East Anglia – will give talks on Saturday 31st August, alongside an artist Q+A. An artist book documenting the Soundmarks collaboration – containing a download of Rob’s sound installation piece – will be available to purchase’.


This exhibition is funded by the Arts Council with support from the Aldborough Roman Town Project, English Heritage and Friends of Roman Aldborough.

Soundmarks runs to till the 31st August, 10 till 5 during the weekends and Monday, 12 till 5 Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, at The Shed, Aldborough Manor, Aldborough, York, YO51 9EP. Further information on Soundmarks can be found online on their website.

For booking a place at the talks and Q&A during this week, and other further September workshops, these are free but you will need to book a place through the Eventbrite website page here.

Excavating the Steam Engine
Our sister organisation CBA North West have arranged a conference in Bolton, Lancashire. John Roberts, CBA North West’s Membership Secretary, writes;

‘I am very pleased to inform you that CBA North West in partnership with the Association for Industrial Archaeology and the Centre for Applied Archaeology, University of Salford will be hosting the 39th North West Industrial Archaeology Conference on Friday September 27th. The conference is being held at Bolton Museum. As this year is the 200th anniversary of the death of James Watt the theme is excavating the steam engine. With excellent speakers and a tour of Bolton Steam Museum in the afternoon it promises to be a splendid day. There are discounts for CBA North West and Association for Industrial Archaeology members. Please note that lunch is not provided. Details, programme and booking information available at the Eventbrite page here‘.

This conference includes a talk on the Reel Fitz Pit Engine, of Little Clifton (between Workington and Cockermouth for those who don’t know) in Cumbria, where a short-lived Newcomen engine was of around 1780. There were many early engines in the West Cumbria coalfield during the 18th century. This one, however, was excavated in the 1970s. CBA North members with industrial archaeological interests are welcome at this event.

In the future
In our next issue of CBA North news we would like to hear more of what you have been doing over the summer that you think deserves wider coverage. We hope that our next email to you won’t be as delayed as this one and will be out early September.

There are a number of Committee places to fill in the forthcoming year. If you or your local group would like to become more involved in CBA North, please send us an email or feel free to talk to one of the existing committee for more details.

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X, Y and Z for our final alphabet email of 2017

CBA North News
This is the last email to our Members and Followers of 2017; we also complete our long-running alphabet of archaeology in this email as well with the letters X, Y and Z.

For both the X and Z we’ve a hint of things to come in 2018 and a note for when to expect our first email of 2018 as CBA North has a bit of a break for New Year. Our Y’s note some recent happenings for Yorkshire – one of our CBA regions to our south, but also (through various interests) overlapping also with our own.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 31.12.2017

X’s in CBA North: a hint of things to come
We’ve a list of at least XLIX local archaeological group meetings across the CBA North region (for those that don’t do Roman numerals this is 49). In the list we have X’s in a lecture dealing with DNA in X (and Y) chromosomes as well as mystery X’s as well with dates decided by groups, but topics and speakers to be confirmed later. As ever it looks to be a fascinating set of events.

Yorkshire news and organisations
The CBA North region as you all know is a huge area which covers all of Cumbria, Northumberland and Durham, as well as the districts that made up the previous Cleveland as well as Tyne and Wear areas. In our Constitution these areas are fully defined as they now are and include portions of the two Yorkshire-based National Parks. Members will likely remember, perhaps more than most, of previous boundary changes. Indeed much pre-1974 was in the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire.

As such we have there are a number of pieces of Yorkshire-based news.

Members with friends and families in the southeast of our region may be interested to know of the launch of a Moors & Valleys Young Archaeologists Club in February 2018. This will be based at The Moors National Park Centre, Danby, and is going to run activities across North Yorkshire and Teesside.

The club is going to be open to everyone aged from 8 to 16 and looking to get involved in all sorts of activities, including demonstrations, activities, visiting and investigating sites in the future.

If you are interested in further details, please contact Maria-Elena Calderon on 01439 772 700 or email her through this link.

Other developments for Yorkshire, perhaps of particular interest to members south of the Tees, now include the recent work of the Yorkshire Archaeological Society. Like many societies they have scanned all their older volumes of the Yorkshire Archaeological Journal. These can be found online, freely available to all, on this page of the society.

Z’s: a break for CBA North emails
CBA North emails will be having a short break – albeit till the 2nd January. We’ll be sending you our Chair’s message for 2018 and details of local group meetings all across our region. If you’ve any last minute additions for that list – let us know!

CBA North Committee are full of busy behind the scenes for later in 2018, though we’ll also be catching up on sleep so ZZZs end our alphabet of archaeology for 2017!

Further events around the CBA North region next week

CBA North News

Events continue at speed all across the CBA North region. Tonight sees the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle’s lecture on Medieval manuscripts whilst you’ll need to be quick to book by the end of this week for the Lancaster University Archaeology Forum for the first March weekend if your interests are more in the northwest of our extensive region.

We, like those manuscripts, also aim to illuminate you. In our case of what is happening across the North coming up soon. Next week, also coming at speed, covers the end of February and start of March means events of the Teesside Archaeological Society at the start of the week, the Till Valley Archaeological Society mid-week and also of the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland in the weekend as well as the Forum just mentioned.

We have details of each and all below for you to take your pick in attending. Enjoy!

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 22.02.2017

Lancaster University 44th Annual Archaeology Forum
This year’s conference includes a number of talks that may be of interest to CBA North members interested in Cumbrian archaeology. These span the archaeological periods of Roman and Medieval on particular sites across Cumbria (Maryport’s temples and Furness Abbey, in further sites in the Duddon Valley and on an early archaeologist of the Urswick area) as well as talks on drones, LIDAR and the Portable Antiquities Scheme in long-standing projects spanning the CBA North and North West regions.

You will need to be quick to book. Details of the day, including further talks, can be found online here with links to the booking system and a map for the venue itself.

Dance of Death
The mystery of our earlier email ‘The Varied Landscapes Of The CBA North Region (And Beyond)’ sent to you on the 12 February is now explained by our group member the Teesside Archaeological Society as explained by David Errickson their Chair. The next lecture, as usual the last Tuesday of the month – the 28 February – at Stockton Library at 7.30 pm, is Death and Discovery.

This lecture will be by David Dance, now a freelance archaeologist, who will discuss the use of archaeology in forensic investigation, exploring the origins of forensic archaeology and its application in criminal investigations of missing or suspected dead persons, with a practical demonstration of forensic archaeology in action.

Further details of the group, and of the speaker, can be found online through the links of their website, accessible through our own webpage in our Local Societies and Groups entry.

The next TillVAS lecture
Later that week is the next TillVAS lecture. With thanks to Maureen Charlton, their Secretary, details are given in their poster below.

Whilst Coldingham might be outside the already large CBA North region there are many Early Medieval and Medieval connections of the various religious houses here to those within CBA North which this lecture might well cover.

(If one looks at the past then suggestions have been made to include the south of Scotland with the north of England at times – not just in the 1470s, but also in the 1970s a suggestion was made to increase the CBA North region!).

Architectural and Archaeological Society lecture
Our email of the 12 February included notice of an open day in Yorkshire following investigations of a Roman road linking with our region. Belinda Burke, Secretary of the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland, another of our group members, sends us details of their next lecture which looks at another site connected by a Roman road – this time Dere Street – to our region.

Clashing dates and Future CBA North events
The 4 March, as we have covered today and in previous emails to you, will be a busy day – the Peregrini (covered in the 12 February email) and Lancaster University Conferences at opposite sides and ends of the region, in addition to the lecture immediately above, as well as CBA North Committee meeting in the morning. It is one of those days with lots clashing!

The agenda for the CBA North Committee will be finalising details for our own events with the dates we have already sent you as 29 April and 20 May – hopefully no clashes for those with anyone else, but if you don’t tell us we don’t necessarily know.

Save those dates if you can!

The varied landscapes of the CBA North region (and beyond)

CBA North News

Now well into February, we are well into the programmes of the local groups and societies all across the CBA North region. As you will recall we cover everywhere between the Scottish Border south to Lancashire and Yorkshire (are we the only thing that would unite those two historic counties so flippantly?). Today we have notices for a variety of landscapes across the CBA North region (and a bit beyond as well).

 Our landscapes include a review of coastal fieldwork in 2016 as well as the announcements in Yorkshire following from previously covered investigations of  ‘Cade’s Road’ (as ‘the bit beyond’) and from Northumberland for the landscapes of the Peregrini Partnership and Hexham Abbey, with a nod to the second Tyne and Wear Heritage Forum’s annual conference in between. 

We will also be letting you know soon of the details for our main CBA North events this year. Both are planned to take place in Newcastle with the 29th April confirmed and 20 May to be confirmed; save both of these dates in your diary if you can! We always try to avoid the dates of other similar organisations where we can. Hopefully we will be able to give you more details of these, as well as recent work by the committee on your behalf, to you in our next set of emails.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 12.02.2017

Local Group Round-up: CITiZAN across CBA North
Andy Sherman and Megan Clement have written the review below of their 2016 across CBA North’s two coasts. We announced their various events throughout the course of last year, here you can see the fruits of their labours on both east and west coasts;

“In 2016 CITiZAN (the Coastal and Inter Tidal Zone Archaeology Network) ran several outreach and training events in CBA North’s region including examining a prehistoric peatshelf on the beach at Blyth, recording post-medieval saltpans in Maryport and surveying the remains of a First World War sea-plane base on Tyneside. As well as being out on the foreshore and the riverside Andy and Megan have spoken at archaeological groups, museums and heritage centres around the region discussing everything coastal.

They have also been running introductory sessions with Young Archaeologist Clubs, Duke of Edinburgh groups and Girl Guide troops, introducing the next generation of heritage enthusiasts to coastal and inter-tidal archaeology. Here our youngest trainees learn about the features you find on the foreshore and why it’s important to record them, as well as being told about some the dangers they might face if they venture into the inter-tidal zone unaccompanied. The CITiZAN North team ran a total of ten outreach and training events across Cumbria, Northumberland and Tyneside in 2016.


Members of the public brave a cold, blustery August day to talk about prehistoric submerged landscapes in Blyth

In July CITiZAN North investigated the foreshore along the Howick coast which today is known for its recreational use with coastal footpaths and holiday cottages. In the 19th century the coast was owned by the Grey family and was known for a different sort of recreation. The second Earl Grey (Charles Grey, Prime Minster from 1830-1834) built a bathing house for his children and wife. He also had two, small rock-cut pools cut into the foreshore, which would have heated up much quicker than the surrounding sea, for his family to swim in. Earlier in the summer CITiZAN identified a third rock-cut pool a short distance along the coast south of the bathing house that our volunteers helped us record.


CITiZAN volunteers and staff discuss the 2nd Earl Grey’s bathing pool on the Howick foreshore

On a sunnier day in August we investigated the lime processing industry in the Northumberland village of Beadnell. Lime is a versatile product used for a wide range of things from the building industry to agriculture. The material has been processed in Beadnell for hundreds of years with the earliest known kiln having been found on a short promontory known as Ebb’s Nook and archaeomagnetically-dated to c1480-1520 AD. Perhaps the most well-known lime kilns in Beadnell are those constructed in the late-18th century by John Wood and later converted to smoke fish in the 19th century.

A short distance north of the harbour is a lime kiln eroding out of the edge of Dell Point, one of four kilns marked on an estate map of 1759. CITiZAN’s volunteers photographed and drew the remains of this kiln preserving it in record before it is fully destroyed by the sea.

CITiZAN staff and volunteers establishing a section line early in the morning so that a scale drawing of the remains of the Dell Point lime kiln can be made

As part of the training sessions our volunteers are show how to use our app, which can be downloaded on to Apple and Android devices such as smart phones and tablets. The app enables people to record, photograph and geo-locate archaeological features they find on the foreshore.  As well as allowing people to explore our interactive map and discover heritage sites along the English coast.


A CITiZAN volunteer recording part of the submerged forest at Howick using the projects app

Over the summer CITiZAN filmed three television programmes on the archaeology of the coast for Channel 4. The first of these programmes was filmed along the Northumberland coast featuring heritage sites in Beadnell and Howick including the lime kilns and rock-cut bathing pools mentioned above. The programme also featured the wreck of the early-20th century French fishing trawler the Tadorne. Little remains of the wreck on the foreshore now, although part of the partially salvaged boiler from the trawler can be seen rearing above the jagged rocks of the foreshore at low tide.


Filming with cast and crew of Britain at Low Tide at the wreck of the Tadorne

The three television programmes can still be download from More4 if you would like to watch them.  If you are interested in exploring and recording the heritage of England’s coastline you can download our app here.

To keep up to date with the exciting events CITiZAN North are hosting around the coast of the north of England visit: this page“.

Andy Sherman and Megan Clement
CITiZAN, 08.02.2017

[As a stop-press footnote addition to the review Andy also writes “We’re currently looking at several events in the CBA North’s region and are slowly ironing out the various permissions, timings etc. We’ll keep you updated on progress”. Watch this space for more details, Ed.].

Thornton le Street Heritage Lottery Fund Project
John Sheenan writes to tell us that;

“Thornton le Street History Group are launching their Heritage Lottery Fund supported archaeology and history project with an open day to be held in the village hall on Saturday 18th February between 10.00 am and 4.00 pm. Anyone interested in participating is invited to come along, see what is involved and register their interest.
 
Thornton le Street is a typical Vale of York village with extensive evidence of early occupation. The project will study the history of the village and its surrounding area which contains a substantial Scheduled Monument site, a watermill, a river ford, an early church, and landed estates. Two Roman roads are said to converge at this point and it is hoped to resolve whether the village is Roman or medieval in origin.
 
Jim Brightman of Solstice Heritage, who recently led a community archaeology project at Kiplin Hall in the nearby Vale of Mowbray, will supervise the project which will be of 18 months duration. Training and practical experience will be provided in archaeological fieldwork and historical documentary research. The latest digital recording will be used which will be incorporated into a bespoke website which will be developed by the participants.  
 
If you cannot attend on the day, a project synopsis is available on the village website or you can contact John Sheehan on 01609 771878 or at jgsheehan@btinternet.com“.

Events listed on the CBA North website
Our Events page has now settled for a while. Though many of the February events have been and gone, there are a few still to come in the regular programmes of the Lunesdale and Teesside Archaeological Societies covering the Neolithic of the northwest, as well as the mysteriously titled Dance of Death.

Please let us know any questions, comments or information that you have or want publicising by emailing cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org. We have been emailed the three announcements of more one-off events below which you might be interested in. Versions of these posters, which you can download, if you wish to click the links, circulate yourself to your own group’s members or wish to book up, can be found in our blog and website versions of this email.

Peregrini Landscape Partnership Conference

The download-able version of this poster can be found here.

Tyne and Wear Heritage Forum: 2nd Annual Conference
We have been told that the Tyne & Wear Heritage Forum’s event this year will be on Saturday, May 13th 2017, at the Wallsend Memorial Hall. Further information on this day will be available soon.

Hexham Abbey Day School
Members will recount that some of our previous AGMs have been held at Hexham which covered plans for further display and interpretation of the buildings of the abbey. Looking further ahead – to July this time. You will notice, however, that there are advantages in planning ahead as an early bird discount (till the end of March) is offered.


Once again we’ve included a download-able version of this for you – this can be found here as Hexham day school. This includes the booking form on the second page of what is evidently designed to be as a folded leaflet as well.

We were sent details of this last event by Chris Tolan-Smith and Jo Shoebridge; please feel free to let us any information that you may want publicising as well.

A cohort of conferences?

CBA North News

What is the collective noun for Roman archaeology conferences? Is it a cohort, a century or merely a collection?

Fortunately it is not a clash as the three such conferences happen this and next month on separate days and at separate locations. Two are based in our CBA North region, with one of the talks covering sites in our neighbour’s CBA Yorkshire territory. Meanwhile an event within CBA Yorkshire territory also covers topics of our area which we think might be of interest to you.

The Romans and Hadrian’s Wall, like it or loathe it, are one of the defining features of our region’s archaeology and here to stay for a bit more it seems. In between those the regular meetings of our own group members also continue on. This week talks are on Post-Medieval Derwentcote in County Durham, Medieval Cumbria and a pair of lectures on even earlier Neanderthal hunting.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
11.10.2016

Hadrian’s Wall Archaeology Forum

Tickets to the conference are £12.00 and can be obtained from the Queens Hall box office. They can be contacted through the email address boxoffice@queenshall.co.uk or by ringing 01434 652477.

Romans and Natives in Central Britain
 
October 2016’s calendar of regular society events
3 October – Depicting the Dead: an insight into craniofacial analysis for forensic identification and archaeological investigation, Dr Eilidh Ferguson [BAS]
8 October – Death on the Nile: Uncovering Lives and the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt [NEAES]
9 October – Bosworth 1485, Dr Glenn Foard [TILLVAS]
12 October –  Excavations at Derwentcote: a Study in Nineteenth Century Worker’s Housing, Rob Young [NAG]
13 October – Mapping the Medieval Landscape of Cumbria, Dr Caron Newman [APPLEBY]
16 October – David Dippie Dixon Memorial Lectures: William Boyd and Controversy as well as Neanderthal Hunting and animal avoidance strategies, Professor Mark White [CCA]
19 October – The archaeology of St John Lateran and the transformation of Rome from Septimius Severus to Constantine, Professor Ian Haynes [ARCH & ARCH]
25 October – Children of the Revolution, Dr Becky Gowland [TAS]
26 October – Kirkharle, Rothley and Alnwick: the three Northumberland landscapes of Capability Brown, Nick Owen [SANT]

Details as to times and venues for all these events can be found in our Local Societies and Groups page of our website.

The Arbeia Society Conference
Those fans of Roman small finds, and in particular of dragonesque brooches, who have seen the Dales Landscape Heritage group’s logo above will perhaps think of South Shields for where a similar one has been found. That, as well as being a Roman conference itself, leads us nicely into the announcement – kindly sent to us by Paul Bidwell – of another annual conference, that of The Arbeia Society, whose poster is given below.

North Yorkshire Archaeology Service at Risk

North Yorkshire Archaeology Service at Risk
Budget cuts threaten Historic Environment Team, Archaeological and Environmental Services | Find out what you can do

The future of the North Yorkshire County Council historic environment team is at risk after new budget cuts at North Yorkshire County Council, agreed last month, which include a reduction of over £470,000 in the budget for Waste and Countryside Services. This will include a reduction of £155,000 in staff costs for waste, archaeology, biodiversity and ecology services over the next year (2014/15).

The historic environment team currently employs four members of staff, including an HER officer, and provides archaeological guidance to local planning authorities, developers, residents and land owners. They also maintain the county historic environment record.

“These cuts are part of Council measures to cut their overall budget
by £94 million over 4 years (to the end of March 2015)
with additional cuts of up to £73 million
anticipated for the period 2015-19.”

The main roles of the archaeological service are to:

  • Provide archaeological advice to local planning authorities;
  • Provide pre-planning guidance to developers and residents, and archaeological advice to landowners and agents;
  • Provide guidance on archaeological work across the county, including commercial and community-led excavations;
  • Maintain and manage heritage information and access to it (including curating the North Yorkshire Historic Environment Record);
  • Promote the historic environment of the region.

The service covers the county of North Yorkshire outside of the Yorkshire Dales and North York Moors National Parks. North Yorkshire is the largest county in Britain and has a significant and diverse archaeological heritage.

“As seen in other parts of the country e.g. in Worcestershire) archaeology services have the potential to generate income through commercial work,  service charges and grant-funded projects. However, without sufficient staff in post to put this into practice, the service is likely to be increasingly vulnerable to cuts in future (which is a particular worry considering the anticipated budget cuts predicted by the Council over the next 4-5 years).”

What to do now

  • Read this short briefing document prepared by the Council for British Archaeology (PDF format, 2 pages).
  • If you are resident (and vote) in North Yorkshire write to your Councillor and consider writing to your MP.
    Keep your letter short, to the point, empathetic to the challenges facing councils, and polite. Always identify yourself and that you are one of the people they represent. Your voice counts more if they think you vote for them.
    See some more advice on How to Communicate with Your Elected Representative Effectively.
  • Find details of the County Councillor for your area via the council’s website: http://democracy.northyorks.gov.uk/Committees.aspx?councillors=1
  • Please share this message with other interested groups in North Yorkshire.
  • The CBA will be writing to John Weighell, the Council Leader.