Tag Archives: Newcastle

Further March Events – this weekend and next week

CBA North News
In this issue we have a number of announcements for events this weekend and next week. As some are happening soon you will need to book up. More news of projects and publications that have recently been completed or been published will be coming your way soon!

As we noted last time, we have updated our Local Societies and Groups section of our website. It now has the details of one of our local groups – the Northern Archaeology Group – so please continue to let us know any further changes. It is to your benefit to keep us abreast of changes.

Please feel free to circulate our news around your own contacts, especially your local group if you are one of our group member reps. Even if you yourself cannot attend the meetings listed someone else might. As noted in our last email to you we are especially interested in your views and news! We have a number of news items from Cumbria, mid-Northumberland and Durham to come in our next issue.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
06.03.2019

County Durham Archaeology Day 2019
David Mason, Principal Archaeologist at Durham County Council, has sent us details of this year’s County Durham Archaeology Day which is this Saturday. There is still some time to book your tickets if you would like to attend; clicking on the poster will take you to the online page.

CBA North will be having a stall there with a few publications for sale from £2 to £17 on a range of topics – feel free to say hello to the committee members there and let us know how we are doing as a regional group for you. Our group members the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland, as well as Teesside Archaeological Society, will also be having stalls there.

Eastern Borders History Gathering
For those that may be more interested in the northern parts of the CBA North region you may be more interested in the Eastern Borders History Gathering to be also held on Saturday. In this case the focus is on north Northumberland and the adjoining Berwickshire part of the Scottish Borders.

Some members may well remember previous discussions about the size of the CBA North region. On looking back through the CBA North archive some members suggested expanding the size of the region to include southern Scotland!

A CBA National event in our region
Your views are particularly welcome at two events next week as well. The results of the survey carried out by CBA National last year, whose link we carried in the December email to you, have now been compiled. We and CBA National are keen to hear your further views to develop your membership and what you would like to do in the future.

All members of CBA North by whatever permutation of National-to-North, North-only, individual, joint, family, group and student category that you come under are welcome to take part in the following two events on Monday and Tuesday, 11th and 12th March.

Claire Shirtcliffe of Tricolor Associates writes;
“We are working with the Council for British Archaeology (CBA) to develop their audiences and help them understand what they can do to break down the barriers to people learning more about archaeology.

I am delighted to invite to you to a focus group session on 12th March  2019 at The Bridge Hotel, Castle Square, Newcastle at 6:30pm. If you would like to attend this session, please pre-register your attendance by emailing cba@tricolorassociates.co.uk with the following details: Your Name, Contact Number, Session slot and location (Newcastle).

If you can’t make the session, but would still love to be involved, we are organising an online webinar: “How to Make Archaeology Accessible for Different People” on 11th March 2019 at 7:30pm. Please visit https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3188015670057516556 to register. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. We would be delighted if you were able to join us on the 12th March 2019 and look forward to hearing from you.

Kind regards,
Emma
Emma Shirtcliffe”

Once again CBA North Committee members will also be there to hear your views as we are the regional group within the local-regional-national group structure of CBA, but feel free to let us know your views at any other time.

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CBA North’s Chair’s Spring message, February and March Events, and news

CBA North Chair’s Spring message
Dear CBA North Members,

I am writing to you for the first time in my capacity as Chair of CBA North to thank you for your continued membership and support. I would also like to highlight some of the work of CBA North, which I hope will be of interest.

Firstly, our regularly updated events page contains details of the date, speaker, title and local society to which the talk is being presented: https://cbanorth.wordpress.com/events/

We try to include details of as many public talks on archaeology and history which take place in the region, though if your group is not represented please let us know and we shall update our list of events. As you can see from the list there is a great range of talks given every week across the region.

The contact information for these groups can be found in the Local Societies and Groups section of our website: https://cbanorth.wordpress.com/local-societies-and-groups/

As with the talks, if the contact details of your group are absent or out of date please let us know.

This year we are exploring new ways in which we can serve our members and we are asking you for suggestions. If there are things you think we could change, information you would like to see passed on, or activities which you think would boost local interest in heritage matters please write to us or email us with your suggestions.

This activity can only take place through the support of our members, and through the volunteered time of the CBA North committee: https://cbanorth.wordpress.com/committee/

If you feel you could contribute to the work of CBA North, and you would like to think of becoming a committee member please get in touch. The committee is for everyone, and you do not need to be a professional archaeologist or historian to be a member. Archaeology for All is the motto of the Council for British Archaeology and we hope our committee represents the diversity of our members.

Thank you again for your continued support.

All the best for 2019,

Don O’Meara
Chair of CBA North
22.02.2019

February and March 2019 Events
We’ve pulled out the February and March 2019 events from our events page and the fuller listing as a whole for you here. There is much happening despite it being within the last full week of February and the first week of March, as well as later in the year accessible through the link above.

February 2019
4 February – The Paxton Waterwheel: restoration of an 18th century water supply system, John Home-Robertson [BAS]
6 February – Operation Nightingale, Alexander Sotheran [TILLVAS]
6 February – AGM and presentations [TYNEDALE]
7 February – The first season’s work at Linbrig, John Nolan [CCA]
11 February – Holy Island lifeboats, Linda Bankier [Lowick Heritage Group]
11 February – Viking age Cumbria, Fiona Edmonds [LUNESDALE]
12 February – Sir William Arrol & Co Ltd, Dr Miles Oglethorpe [NEWCOMEN]
13 February – Archaeobotany and urban environments – cesspits and sanitation in Medieval England, Don O’Meara [NAG]
14 February – Investigating lead tokens from Holm Cultram Abbey, Kate Rennicks [APPLEBY]
23 February – Nationalism and Archaeology: Excavating Romania’s Roman Past, Emily Hamscan [ARCH & ARCH]
26 February – Recent Research on the Bombardment of the Hartlepools, World War I, Mark Simmons [TAS]
27 February – Excavations at Derwentcote: An Analysis of Nineteenth Century Workers’ Housing, Rob Young [SOCANTS]
28 February – Sir Vincent Riden – Last Chief Mechanical Engineer of the North Eastern Railway, Andrew Everett [Tyneside Industrial Archaeology Group]
February – title and speaker to be announced [NEAES]

March 2019
4 March – Animal Bones in Roman Britain (title to be confirmed), Dr Jim Morris [BAS]
6 March – Bronze Age Burials in N.E. England and S.E. Scotland, Dr Chris Fowler [TILLVAS]
11 March – Deserted Medieval Villages of North Northumberland, Allan Colman [Lowick Heritage Group]
11 March – Stone circles, rings and mounds in Cumbria, Tom Clare [LUNESDALE]
13 March – Excavations at Berk Farm round mound, Isle of Man – the story so far, Dr Chris Fowler [NAG]
14 March – The Work of the Cumbria Vernacular Buildings Group, June Hill [APPLEBY]
16 March – AGM and Exploring North Pennine Place Names, Diana Whaley [ALTOGETHER]
16 March – Deir el-Medina revisited: latest work and discoveries from a site thought to be well known, Cedric Gobeil [NEAES]
20 March – Seven hours, a rubber dingy and a shipwreck: the search for Nova Zembla, Matthew Ayre [NAG]
23 March – Cresswell Pele Tower: From Reivers to Ruins to Restoration, Barry Mead [ARCH & ARCH]
26 March – Buildings of the Historic Core of Skelton, Robin Daniels [TAS]
27 March – Public and private in a domestic context: The underground spaces of the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, Thea Ravasi [SOCANTS]
28 March – Aspects of the industrial infrastructure on Holy Island, Roger Jermy [CCA]
28 March – Kenton Wartime Bunker; Past, Present and Future, John Mabbit & Russ Charnock [Tyneside Industrial Archaeology Group]

Local Group Round-up:
the 2018 activities of the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland

Jennifer Morrison, former CBA North Secretary and now Committee member of the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland (variously known as the AASDN or even shorter the ‘Arch & Arch’), has written an update of their activities in 2018. Another filled year awaits its members in 2019. She writes;

The Society has had another activity-filled year.

We had five lectures on a selection of wide-ranging topics. Most of the talks were held in our usual venue at Elvet Riverside in Durham. In June Dr Stephanie Piper, Assistant Project Archaeologist with Archaeological Services Durham University and Lithic Specialist, talked to members about the Mesolithic in the Western Isles of Scotland. Our July lecture was given by Dr Sonia O’Connor, Honorary Visiting Fellow, University of York Post-Doctoral Researcher, Archaeological Sciences, part of the AGES Division in the University of Bradford, on the fascinating use of x-rays in archaeological science. Sonia’s lecture was followed by a wine reception at Durham Heritage Centre and Museum. In September Emma Watson of Durham University gave a paper on the ‘forgotten’ and sometimes neglected prehistoric monuments in northern England. Emma will be leading a bus trip for the society to see some of these monuments in 2019. Our autumn lecture was by Peter Ryder, Buildings Historian, on the under-studied nonconformist chapels of the North-East. In November Dr Kayt Armstrong, a Researcher with Durham University, talked about landscapes of the Great Depression in North East England.

The Society’s Annual General Meeting in May was held at Trinity House in Newcastle, with our guided tour led by Grace McCombie, buildings historian. Our December Members Meeting on 1st December was hosted by Ormesby Hall. We had this lovely National Trust property, which was decorated for a 1950s Christmas, all to ourselves for the afternoon. Five short enjoyable informal presentations by members were followed by tea and cake.

AASDN members have been treated to three excursions this year. On 23rd June members enjoyed an informative guided walk around Sunniside Conservation Area in Sunderland, led by John Tumman, co-author of Sunderland Heritage Forum’s town trail A Walk Around Historic Sunderland: The Fawcett and Sunniside Estates. In 1810 the Wearmouth Bridge Commissioners paid the Fawcett family £500 for a road, now Fawcett Street, to be taken across their fields to serve the new bridge, which had been built in 1796. The development of this part of Sunderland then accelerated rapidly. Four storey terraced houses with private gardens were built on Fawcett Street for the middle classes and it became the principal residential street in town.


One of Sunderland’s more unusual buildings:
The Elephant Tea Rooms, 65-66 Fawcett Street, Sunderland

On Saturday 18th August we had an enjoyable trip to the market town of Barnard Castle, led by Caroline Hardie. The town was founded in the twelfth century. We explored the maze of streets and alleyways behind the main street. Amongst the lesser known architectural gems of the town, we saw weavers’ cottages on Thorngate with their characteristic row of windows directly beneath the roof eaves, Thorngate cloth mill, the former Methodist chapel on West View, now converted into apartments and the richly carved chest tomb of George Hopper who died aged 23 in 1725.

Our last excursion of 2018 was to Aldborough. Rose Ferraby and Professor Martin Millett guided us around Roman Isurium, the capital of the Brigantes tribe. Isurium was probably founded in the late first or early second century. The Roman road through Isurium formed a leg of both Dere Street and Watling Street.

The society website has its own website: http://www.aasdn.org.uk/. Membership of AASDN costs only £20 a year and joint membership is £25. Enquiries about membership should be sent to the Membership Secretary, Janet McDougall, who can be emailed here.

Stop Press!
As you will see in the events listed above, the ‘Arch & Arch’ lecture for February is tomorrow afternoon in Durham. Everyone is welcome to hear Emily Hamscan speak on Nationalism and Archaeology: Excavating Romania’s Roman Past on Saturday afternoon at Durham. The time and venue of the lecture can be seen in looking at our Twitter pages for their poster, which can be found here.

CBA North’s event: 2018 AGM and Newcastle Cathedral tour

Council for British Archaeology North
c/o The Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle
Great North Museum: Hancock
Barras Bridge
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE2 4PT
 
29 July 2018

Dear CBA North Members,

Notice of CBA North Annual General Meeting,
Saturday 18 August 2018

I write to give you the formal notice of our Annual General Meeting which will take place on Saturday 18 August 2018 at 10.30am. This will be in the rooms of Saint Nicholas Cathedral, Newcastle upon Tyne (see stnicholascathedral.co.uk/ for more).

The agenda is given below. Business will begin promptly at 10.30am, but people can arrive from 10.00am for tea or coffee refreshments. A summary of the 2017 AGM is available on request. Please confirm your attendance, or send apologies in, for this meeting through an email to us.

I would encourage you to get involved with CBA North – we are the only regional archaeological group for both individuals and groups interested in the archaeology and history of our region as a whole. Our goal is to promote at a local, regional, and national level (via the CBA networks) the archaeology, history and historic environment of the North-East and Cumbria.

CBA North Committee, as at any other time, welcome thoughts on what you think we should be doing in the forthcoming year. If you would like to raise an issue at the AGM please let us know at least seven days before the meeting. Group members should identify their representatives for the day.

If you or your group would like to give a short update or display of your own activities following the morning business part of the AGM please let us know.

We will then break for lunch – you are welcome to bring your own lunch to the cathedral if preferred, though numerous cafes and restaurants are close by – before reconvening at 2.00pm for a tour of our venue as church, cathedral as well as a prison at times. This will be led by David Heslop, a familiar face to many of you, now Cathedral Archaeologist, who will be detailing recent and current project work in the cathedral.

I would be most grateful if you could let me know whether you will be attending the meeting. Please email me by Wednesday 15 August 2018 at the very latest.

Yours sincerely,

Keith Elliott
Secretary, CBA North

Council for British Archaeology North AGM 2018 Agenda
Registered Charity Number 1098854

NOTICE is hereby given of the Annual General Meeting of the Charity to be held at Saturday 18 August 2018. This will be in the rooms of Saint Nicholas Cathedral, Newcastle upon Tyne on Saturday 18 August 2018 at 10.30am precisely for the following purposes:

1          to receive and consider the final accounts for the year ended 31 July 2018
2          to receive and consider the annual report for the year ended 31 July 2018
3          Chair’s Report (including Treasurer’s Report)
4          election of CBA North committee members
5          any other business notified to the Chairman at least seven days in advance of the meeting or business from the floor
6          any local society update talks or displays
 
By order of the committee

Chris Jones
CBA North Chair
Dated 29 July 2018

1. Any member of the charity aged 18 and over is entitled to vote at the AGM. Organisational members are entitled to one vote and should appoint a representative to vote on their behalf.

2. Any member of the charity aged 18 and over who is entitled to attend, speak and vote at the above mentioned meeting may appoint a proxy to attend, speak and, on a poll, vote instead of that member. A proxy need not be a member of the charity.

The Willington Waggonway and two conferences – events this week

CBA North News
Events continue thick and fast!

With autumn quickly changing to winter our announcements change to notices and events summarising work carried out of previous projects and this year as well. This week’s events follow that trend, so here is a reminder of two events we’ve previously noticed, as well as a third in Scotland, which might be of interest to you.

We already have details for 2018 events from some of the local groups. If you would like to send round details of your group’s events for what is the most read of our emails at the start of the year for everyone else to see, please feel free to send them on.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
13.11.2017

The Willington Waggonway

The Arbeia Society Conference

Edinburgh, Lothian and Borders Archaeology Conference
Here’s another event also happening on Saturday which might also be of interest.

The programme for this day can be found here. Online bookings can be made here.

Another open day – Morley Hill enclosures tomorrow!

CBA North News
We covered an open day for the Roman bath house at Carlisle earlier in the month, here is some last minute news of an open day on a prehistoric site in North Tyneside tomorrow for you!

More news to come next week.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
27.10.2017

Morley Hill enclosures excavation open day

Further events this weekend

CBA North News
Some last minute news of further events this weekend that might interest you. If you would like to attend the events organised by the Northumberland National Park on Saturday and Sunday, then you’ll need to book up today.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
13.10.2017

Northumberland National Park events
Northumberland National Park are running a pair of events this weekend. These are;

…and on Sunday there is a guided walk of Lordenshaw and Simonside. Again you will need to book up for this which you can do following this link.

The English Renaissance Herbal and its European Antecedents

On Saturday morning there is another lecture to be held by the Natural History Society of Northumbria. Marie Addyman will talk at 1030 at the Clore Suite, the Great North Museum: Hancock in Newcastle, upon at the centuries of European and English precedents which local man William Turner of Morpeth, the ‘Father of English Botany’, drew upon in his A New Herball of 1551 to 1568.

Turner’s work is considered to be the first herbal in English to give accurate descriptions of the plants listed as well as their medical uses, but he did not invent the genre. This event includes a lecture and exhibition of materials held by the society.

A reminder about Saturday’s Arch & Arch lecture
In case you missed our earlier email with the change in details for the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland’s lecture, a quick reminder with the poster below for the change in details of Saturday afternoon’s lecture is below.

Our CBA North alphabet of archaeology continues: K to M

CBA North News
Our alphabet of archaeology is back covering letters K to M – with a series of M’s we have to hand. Again we cover as much of the CBA North region we can for news of interest to all Members and Followers. We start with the killing of a bull – Taurean readers “may wish to look away now” as the news sports reports start, have a quick announcement on the Lake District in case anyone missed it and also notice a further Festival of Archaeology event that covers the Mesolithic to the Medieval.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 18.07.2017

Mithras: Roman Religion from the Thames to Tyne
At the Great North Museum: Hancock, Newcastle, Members will recall we had our AGM this year – indeed seeing specially loaned exhibits associated with the Roman cavalry Turma project. Members interested in the Roman period now have another reason to visit the museum to see further specially loaned exhibits associated with the sun god Mithras, appropriate as we are now finally into the summer perhaps. Jonathan Loach of Tyne and Wear Museums has kindly provided us with both the press release and pictures detailing this exhibition.

“This exhibition runs from Saturday 1 July to Sunday 27 August. It brings together for the first time objects found in the 1950s during excavations of two important temples to the god Mithras, at Carrawburgh on Hadrian’s Wall and Walbrook in London.


The three main altars from the Carrawburgh Mithraeum © Tyne and Wear Museums

The Carrawburgh finds – owned by the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne and on show in the Great North Museum: Hancock – include three altars to Mithras as well as sculptures and religious utensils. They are joined by three exquisite marble heads of Mithras, Minerva and Serapis found at Walbrook [see at the base of today’s articles],…


Profile of a Roman marble head of Mithras © Museum of London

…and a sketch reconstruction of the interior of Carrawburgh temple by artist Alan Sorrell.

Reconstruction by Alan Sorrell of the interior of the Temple to Mithras © Museum of London

Caroline McDonald, Manager at the Great North Museum: Hancock, said:
“This is a once in a lifetime chance for anyone interested in archaeology to see these two internationally important Roman Mithras collections side by side. It’s never happened before and is not to be missed.
“I’m thrilled that we’ve been able to work with the Museum of London, my home for many years, on making this display a reality.”

Mithras was an ancient Persian god adopted in the Roman Empire as the main deity of a mystery religion that flourished in the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD. The religion was open only to men and some scholars believe its worshippers were highly secretive about their rituals and beliefs.

Mithras was both a sun god and a creator god. Iconography found in his temples often focuses on the act of creation in which Mithras kills a bull and life – in the form of ears of wheat – emerges from the slain animal’s tail. The god is frequently depicted as being born of a rock or egg, and the Great North Museum: Hancock holds a unique carving found at Housesteads Roman Fort showing the birth of Mithras from the cosmic egg.


The unique stone from Housesteads described above © Tyne and Wear Museums

Andrew Parkin, Keeper of Archaeology at the Great North Museum: Hancock, said:
“This exhibition provides us with the unique opportunity to tell the story of the worship of Mithras in Roman Britain from two different perspectives. As a god worshipped both in the provincial capital of London and on the northern frontier of Hadrian’s Wall.”

The excavations of the Mithraic temples at Carrawburgh and Walbrook in the 1950s captured the public imagination and stimulated interest in Mithras and the cult-like religion bearing his name.

The London temple was discovered during building work in 1954 and revealed the fine marble sculptures of Mithras, Minerva and Serapis. Around 400,000 visitors came to see the temple in just a fortnight and a campaign to save it was started. Even then Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill was involved in discussions about its preservation. The eventual outcome saw the temple moved to a nearby location where the public could see it.

Roy Stephenson, Head of Archaeological Collections at the Museum of London, said:
“We are delighted to be able to share these incredible sculptures with the people of the north-east of England, more especially as the collection at the Great North Museum: Hancock made such a formative impression on me as a child. I encourage everyone to go and see these important artefacts together while they can.”


The marble head of Serapis as found carefully buried under one of the floor levels of the Walbrook Mithraeum © Museum of London

By the 4th century AD, Roman Mithraism was in decline as Christianity spread across the Empire. The discovery of the heads of Mithras and Serapis at Walbrook – carefully hidden, buried underneath the temple flooring – may attest to the fact that the temple switched its worship to the god Bacchus”.

A pair of events will take place on this Friday, 21 July, at the museum in connection with this exhibition. At 12.30 there will be a gallery talk Why do Museums create imitation Mithraea? and at 17.30 there will be a public talk Staging religious experience in the Mithraeum: Mystagogues and Meanings both by Professor Richard Gordon of Erfurt University. Further details can be found here.

Additionally there is also another gallery tour on Friday, 28 July, as part of this exhibition whose details can be found here.

The Lake District as a World Heritage Site
Members and Followers will have doubtless heard or seen the news that the Lake District National Park is Britain’s newest (and 31st) World Heritage Site. Details on this can be found on the pages of the National Park here.

This now means that there are four World Heritage Sites within the CBA North region. Uniquely, at the moment, this also means that Ravenglass Roman fort and bath house are located in two World Heritage Sites. There are also four National Parks and four Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty as well – there is much happening in all of these areas. We hope to report upon something from these soon.

The Mesolithic to Medieval at Cresswell: another Festival of Archaeology Event
Members and Followers will recall that we publicised something on the fieldwork around the village and tower at Cresswell, Northumberland, earlier in the year.


Excavations underway at Cresswell Tower earlier in the year

Next week sees a talk, as another within the Festival of Archaeology, which will summarise the findings – thus far – of the project. In a surfeit of M’s for our alphabet will be present with finds from the Mesolithic to the Medieval recorded, by a further M. Barry Mead will describe all in his talk on Wednesday, 26 July, at Cresswell village hall. Details for this event are on the Festival of Archaeology pages here.