Tag Archives: Museum

Wear-based archaeology next week

CBA North News
Today quick news of two events which may be of particular interest to those in the Sunderland and County Durham area.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
20.10.2017

North Hylton Community Archaeology Dig
This is an opportunity for both adults and children to take part in fieldwalking, trial trenching (small test pits for children) and finds washing. No experience is necessary, training will be provided by professional archaeologists from Wardell Armstrong and all equipment will be provided.

The purpose of the work is to investigate the cropmark visible above on aerial photographs. This project is funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

The archaeological work will run from Monday 23rd October until 3rd November. Volunteers can attend for as few or as many days as they wish, but they do need to book a place. If you are interested please contact;

Frank Giecco     fgiecco@wardell-armstrong.com

Norman Kirtlan     sunderlandsforgottenstones@gmail.com

Further information on the project can be found at Sunderland’s Forgotten Stones website here.

The Durham River Wear Assemblage Project
Also next week is a lecture on finds from the Durham River Wear Assemblage Project.

Further information on the project can be found on here in the pages of the Department of Archaeology, Durham University.

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Last minute announcement of TAS talk tonight

CBA North News
A quick posting to our Members and Followers to notice that the Teesside Archaeological Society’s lecture tonight – only announced last night – will be Durham’s Museum of Archaeology and its Collections by Gemma Lewis, at Stockton Central Library as per normal for the group. Details for the group can be found in our Local Societies and Groups webpage.


Part of the exhibition and activity space at the Durham Museum of Archaeology

Details of other events to come, as normal are on our own website’s pages, whilst another five days remain of the Festival of Archaeology this year. We would be interested to hear what our Members and Followers are up to over this period – both from organisers of events, as well as in what others have visited. As ever feel free to get in contact with your archaeological news. for others to hear of.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
25.07.2017

Archaeology is ACE across CBA North

CBA North News
Archaeology is ACE across CBA North! – but that, of course, is hardly news to our Members and Followers.

In this issue, however, we spell that out quite literally in an update from the Appleby Archaeology Group, a further notice of Coniston Copper with other Cumbrian Events as a first email to you with details of Festival of Archaeology events, as well as something in of a major event devoted to a single Exceptional Exhibit to be displayed at the Durham Museum of Archaeology. All are updates to pieces of work or follow-up’s on topics we have covered earlier in some way – whether in our emails or events – so perhaps this email should be titled ‘Archaeology is AAGCCCEEEE!’, but that would be a bit of a mouthful.

It is always the way perhaps? Nothing happens and then everything does, but we hope that is no bad thing. We hope that this is the first of other emails that we are going to send in quick succession and to report other news. There is so much happening at the moment across CBA North-land and if you think we should be covering something feel free to let us know what. The pictures at the bottom give you a hint of what is yet to come. Thoughts in advance for how we complete our alphabet of archaeology across CBA North for the Q, U, W, X, Y and Z gratefully received – we are working on it!

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 13.07.2017

DigAppleby: breaking the ground
Martin Joyce, Chair of the Appleby Archaeology Group, Members will recall gave us a talk at last year’s AGM in Corbridge of the group’s plans for fieldwork in 2016. Here he provides for us a 2017 update; the pictures come from the brochure mentioned below. The link for this brochure, at the bottom of the update, will take you to the full version if you would like to print a copy which can be folded up as a leaflet.

“Appleby Archaeology has just completed the first year of its multi-phase investigation into the history of Appleby. To mark the occasion we mounted an exhibition in the Tourist Information Centre in Appleby Town Hall. This has been a community project so we were keen to show the results and to feature pictures of all our volunteers in action.

The exhibition is timed to coincide with the Festival of Archaeology and will run until the end of July.

The project was very successful in capturing interest and support. Quite a few households proved keen to offer their back-gardens as test-pit sites. Our palaeography courses also proved very popular and we were lucky to be able to gain access to a variety of documents that revealed life in Medieval Appleby in a surprisingly vivid and immediate way.

A full report on the first year is available on our website at DigAppleby – Breaking the Ground.

This is a bit technical so we also produced a small colour brochure introducing and describing the work in more popular terms, that could be given away free by the Tourist Information Centre”.

DigAppleby’s project blog, including pictures of the display, can be found online here, and details of the Appleby Archaeology Group more generally through our own CBA North website pages.

Coniston Copper and other Cumbrian Events
Saturday sees the launch of this year’s Festival of Archaeology events all across the country and across CBA North-land as well from 15 to 30 July this year. There are a number of events covering topics that we’ve previous carried notice of – you will doubtless recall the picture below that we sent to you earlier in the year of the Coniston Copper mines sent to us by Penny Middleton of Northern Archaeological Associates.

If you didn’t get involved in the fieldwork project an event, as part of the Festival of Archaeology, is being held on Saturday 15 July at the Coniston Boating Centre between 11.00 and 15.30 as part of a mining heritage day. Further details can be found online here where further opportunities to get involved in fieldwork are also listed.

Other Cumbrian events can for the Festival of Archaeology can be found on this page, as well as for elsewhere.

The Lanchester Diploma: Britain’s first named sailor
Durham’s Museum of Archaeology also leads the charge of events for this year’s Festival of Archaeology. For those of you that weren’t at our AGM this year to hear about the Portable Antiquities Scheme, you have a chance to learn some more of the scheme – perhaps also have any of your finds identified as well – on Saturday with this event.

Such a find, indeed an exceptional one, which was reported to the Portable Antiquities Scheme is the Lanchester diploma. Gemma Lewis of the Durham Museum of Archaeology has sent us details of an event relating this new exhibit for the museum. There are a few finds that really change what we know beyond their immediate surroundings  – this is one of them, and on first hearing of this the word “Blimey!” came to mind.

If you would like to attend the event on Thursday 20 July then please email archaeology.museum@durham.ac.uk.

A further event will also be held at the Museum on Saturday 29 July as well when the Roma Antiqua re-enactment group will be present between 11.00 and 15.00 to demonstrate the lives and skills of Roman soldiers. Further details on this event can be found here.

Coach trip to see the Celts

The newest group member of CBA North – the Northumberland Archaeological Group – has sent us details of their planned coach trip to Edinburgh on Saturday, 21st May, to see the Celts Exhibition at the National Museum for which there are spaces still available.

This will leave Newcastle at 8.30am and return by about 6.30 pm. Details and costs etc. are to be confirmed. Those interested in attending should contact Caroline Allott, tel: 01670 513365, or e-mail: cballott@aol.com. Be sure to give your contact details and whether you are entitled to concessionary entrance to the museum. You can also write to 75, Low Stobhill, Morpeth NE61 2SQ, but be sure to give phone number and enclose an SAE.

Please respond to Caroline if you are interested in attending by Monday, 11th April at the latest. Further details on NAG and their programme can be found in our webpages here, and also in our Local Societies and Groups page.

Humans in Ancient Britain micro-exhibition

The Great North Museum: Hancock, in Newcastle, is shortly going to have a micro-exhibition about Humans in Ancient Britain with material on loan from the Natural History Museum, which includes the Swanscombe Neanderthal skull between 24 February  and 7 April.

William King had been a curator at the museum and responsible for naming Neanderthals as a separate species, so especially appropriate for this exhibition. Related to the exhibition are a pair of evening talks and pair of family events based around local collections and Palaeolithic Britain in March and April.

Free Evening Talk at the Great North Museum: Hancock
Tuesday 22 March 2016, 18.30
‘Professor William King’s fossil bones and shells: The scientific legacy of a Geordie in Galway!’
Prof. David Harper
Professor of Palaeontology and Principal of Van Mildert College at Durham University

William King was the first person to name a separate species of human when he gave the species name Homo neanderthalensis to Neanderthals at the British Association for the Advancement of Science meeting at Newcastle in 1863. He was a self-educated man from Sunderland who became curator of the Newcastle Museum (later the Hancock Museum) and then a Professor of Geology and Mineralogy at Queen’s College, Galway. King was a controversial figure, both locally, where he fell out with his employers at the Museum, and nationally as part of the debate on evolution and anthropology.  Professor Harper’s talk explores King’s life and legacy.

Please book in advance.  Tickets are free and available from: https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/date/234953

Free Evening Talk at the Great North Museum: Hancock
Wednesday 6 April 2016, 18.30
‘Palaeolithic Britain: one-million years of human prehistory’
Prof. Mark White
Professor in the Department of Archaeology at Durham University

Mark White is a specialist in the Palaeolithic (the Old Stone Age) of Britain and its near neighbours.  He has worked on many of the key sites of early human occupation in Britain and also has an interest in the Victorian antiquarians who first excavated some of these locations.  His talk will follow the early occupation of Britain and the evidence we have about people who have lived here over the last million years.

Please book in advance.  Tickets are free and available from: https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/date/234941

Free Family Activity Day
Thursday 31 March 11 – 3
Collectors Day

A day where we take William King, the former curator of this museum who named Neanderthals as a separate species, as the springboard to thinking about other local collectors. This day will include contributions from amongst others our own curators plus the Natural History Society of Northumbria, the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne.

Free Family Activity Day
Thursday 7 April 11 – 3,
Neanderthal Thursday

with support from archaeologists from Durham University (tbc), the opportunity to discover our collection of human evolution skull replicas and a hand silhouette cave art activity.

For further information contact;
Dr Kate Holden
Assistant Learning Officer
Great North Museum: Hancock
Barras Bridge
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE2 4PT
0191 208 7578

Gifts for the Gods: Animal Mummies Revealed Lecture

Friends of the Oriental Museum Lecture Series 2015/16 in association with the North East Ancient Egypt Society are holding a joint lecture:

Gifts for the Gods: Animal Mummies Revealed, a lecture by Dr Campbell Price of Manchester Museum will take place on Wednesday 4 November 2015, 7.30pm, in Lecture Room 9, Elvet Hill House (Adjacent to the Oriental Museum), Durham.

See the attached poster for more details

Durham World Heritage Site Architecture and Conservation Series: October Lecture

Please see the message below regarding the next World Heritage Architecture and Conservation Series Lecture:

Dear all,                                                                                             
 
Please find below the details of our Architecture and Conservation Series lecture for October.
I very much hope you will be able to attend.
 
World Heritage Site Architecture and Conservation Series 2015
 
October Lecture
                                                                                                                 
Wednesday 21st October 2015, 6.30pm
Venue: Room PG20 Pemberton Building, Palace Green, Durham
 
 
DAVID DE HAAN
“The Ironbridge Gorge World Heritage Site”

Among the first group of designations in Britain were Durham and the Ironbridge Gorge, the latter being the first industrial site in a country that set in train the Industrial Revolution which heralded the modern world. David de Haan, one of the retired Directors at the Ironbridge Gorge Museum, will look at the World Heritage Site, what was there and how the area was restored. The lecture will present the history, the decline and dereliction that preceded the restoration, and the interpretation and conservation that made possible the WHS nomination. It will also look at the management issues and the visitor profile so that parallels can be drawn.
David is a museum professional with 45 years’ experience, including 8 years at the Science Museum in London and 34 at the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust, where he still works as a volunteer. He managed the Ironbridge Institute’s Heritage Management programme from 1998 and the Museums Management programme from 2001 until his retirement in 2012. He was also responsible for the restoration, interpretation and management of many of the museum sites in Ironbridge. A past Fellow of the Museums Association, past Council Member of the Newcomen Society, and Honorary Secretary of the Association for Industrial Archaeology, David is an acknowledged expert on the Iron Bridge, the 1851 Exhibition and the Art of the Industrial Revolution.
 
The talk will be followed by a drinks reception in the World Heritage Site Visitor Centre.
 
Please book your place by writing to Raffaella Aliprandi at raffaella.aliprandi@durham.ac.uk.
Would you also let me know whether or not you will be attending the reception afterwards, for catering purposes. 
  
 
Please don’t forget to circulate this email to whoever you think might be interested. 
I am looking forward to seeing you at the lecture.
 
 
Kind regards, 
 
Raffaella Aliprandi
Architecture and Conservation Series Organiser