Tag Archives: Monastic

Exploring Northumbria: Trip to Holy Island/Lindisfarne

We’ve just had notice of this trip that is organised by Newcastle University on Saturday. If you aren’t going to any of the many other events that we’ve recently carried notice of – in Cumbria, Lancaster, Lindisfarne (in a different guise) or Durham in previous emails to our Members and Followers – this might appeal to you. If you would like to go, please contact Dr Phillippo direct for further details through her contacts details here as soon as possible.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 02.03.2017

Dear everyone,

   Our next trip in our ‘Exploring classical and historical Northumbria’ series is this coming *Saturday* (note different day to usual), 4th March, to Holy Island and Lindisfarne Priory, one of Northumbria’s highlights. 

*Saturday* 4th March: Holy Island and Lindisfarne Priory (all day)
Start: c. 8.30.  Return by 7.35 p.m.
Cost: £9.70 for all-day NE Explorer ticket, plus any refreshments; entry to sites free.

•       From early Saxon times, the cradle of Northumbrian and British Christianity, and at the heart of Northumbria’s ‘Golden Age’; the celebrated Lindisfarne gospels were created here;
•       Stories of saints, kings and saintly kings, including mobile heads and a friendly raven; and decidedly unsaintly (and unfriendly) Vikings…
•       A tidal causeway, evocative priory ruins, and some of the best coastal scenery in England; also (from outside!) Elizabethan castle (with guest appearances in films such as ‘The Scarlet Pimpernel’…!)

For, with the flow and ebb, its style
Varies from continent to isle;         
Dry-shod, o’er sands, twice every day,
The pilgrims to the shrine find way;  
Twice every day, the waves efface  
Of staves and sandalled feet the trace.  
[…]       
Higher and higher rose to view
The castle with its battled walls.
The ancient monastery’s halls,
A solemn, huge, and dark red pile,  
Placed on the margin of the isle.  (Sir Walter Scott, *Marmion*)

Schedule: 
Meet at Haymarket bus station (outside M&S) stand Q, *no later* than 8.30 and preferably by at least 8.25 (bus leaves 8.33).
Change at Beal road end for Holy Island bus, arrive 11.05.
Explore priory ruins and museum (entry free under educational arrangement with English Heritage); also St Mary’s parish church, parts of which date back to the time of St. Aidan in the 7th C.
c. 1 p.m.: lunch in one of the local cafés (or bring your own packed lunch!)
c. 1.45: walk across the island for coastal views and a look at the Elizabethan Lindisfarne Castle (exterior only, sadly, as NT have closed it for refurbishment; still an impressive sight).
3.45 p.m.: catch bus back to Beal (safely ahead of the tide which cuts the island off twice daily!)
4-5.30: time for refreshments/food in Lindisfarne Inn before catching 17.33 bus to Newcstle (free tea/coffee refills on production of bus ticket!).
Arrive Newcastle 19.36.

*Bring warm clothing and robust footwear*: the island can be breezy even in fine weather; walking is mainly on well-marked paths but you may want to explore the shoreline and will need appropriate shoes or boots for that!

As always, you are very welcome just to turn up on the day, but it is useful to have some idea of numbers in advance so drop me an e-mail if you are interested in coming. Friends from outside the School are also welcome!

My mobile contact no. on the day: 07833 125747.  Let me know a contact number if you plan to use your own transport.
With all best wishes,
  (Dr) S. Phillippo

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Places of Power and the Making of Early Medieval Kingdoms: New Archaeological Perspectives from Lyminge, Kent

Places of Power and the Making of Early Medieval Kingdoms: New Archaeological Perspectives from Lyminge, Kent

20th October 2015, 17:30, Learning Centre, Palace Green Library, the speaker is Dr Gabor Thomas of the University of Reading

This lecture is followed by a drinks reception at the Cafe, Palace Green Library.

Please note that places are limited and will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. To book a place visit:  https://www.dur.ac.uk/imems/events/seminarseries/booking/

 Abstract: This paper reflects upon the results of a major scheme of excavation targeting Anglo-Saxon settlement remains preserved beneath the modern village of Lyminge, Kent, led by the University of Reading and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Encapsulating the detailed examination of a seventh-century ‘great hall’ complex and the outer zones of a documented monastic foundation, these investigations have furnished one of the richest developmental accounts of a royal centre in Anglo-Saxon England. This paper will examine Lyminge’s trajectory as an Anglo-Saxon settlement over the fifth-ninth centuries A.D. and consider its implications for wider interpretations of early medieval kingship and power.

Gabor Thomas is Associate Professor in Early Medieval Archaeology at the Department of Archaeology, University of Reading. He has varied interests in the material culture and settlement archaeology of the early medieval period and is well known both as a field director and an expert in later Anglo-Saxon and Viking-age metalwork, the subject of his PhD at UCL. Previous to Lyminge, he completed a major excavation at the later Anglo-Saxon settlement at Bishopstone, Sussex, published by the Council for British Archaeology in 2010.

 

Contact admin.imems@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.