Tag Archives: Medieval

Northumberland Archaeological Group’s talks for 2016

The Northumberland Archaeological Group (NAG) has the following provisional programme of
talks arranged for 2016. We meet at 7.00pm at the Newcastle Arts Centre, off Westgate Road – the entrance to the centre is in Black Swan Yard. Non-members are invited on the basis that if they wish to attend a second talk they should consider joining NAG. For further details contact the secretary, Gordon Moir, gordon.moir@blueyonder.co.uk or see their website.

Our talks are going to be;
Jan 13th David Astbury, Settlement in South-East Northumberland: new discoveries through remote sensing.
Feb 10th Megan Clement, The CITiZAN project: Coastal and Intertidal Zone Archaeological Network.
March 9th Marco Romeo Pitone, title to be confirmed, but on some aspect of copper extraction.
April 6th John Davies, Salters Nick – Some Final Conclusions.
May 11th Tatiana Ivleva, title also to be confirmed, but on glass bangles in the Iron Age.

Places of Power and the Making of Early Medieval Kingdoms: New Archaeological Perspectives from Lyminge, Kent

Places of Power and the Making of Early Medieval Kingdoms: New Archaeological Perspectives from Lyminge, Kent

20th October 2015, 17:30, Learning Centre, Palace Green Library, the speaker is Dr Gabor Thomas of the University of Reading

This lecture is followed by a drinks reception at the Cafe, Palace Green Library.

Please note that places are limited and will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. To book a place visit:  https://www.dur.ac.uk/imems/events/seminarseries/booking/

 Abstract: This paper reflects upon the results of a major scheme of excavation targeting Anglo-Saxon settlement remains preserved beneath the modern village of Lyminge, Kent, led by the University of Reading and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Encapsulating the detailed examination of a seventh-century ‘great hall’ complex and the outer zones of a documented monastic foundation, these investigations have furnished one of the richest developmental accounts of a royal centre in Anglo-Saxon England. This paper will examine Lyminge’s trajectory as an Anglo-Saxon settlement over the fifth-ninth centuries A.D. and consider its implications for wider interpretations of early medieval kingship and power.

Gabor Thomas is Associate Professor in Early Medieval Archaeology at the Department of Archaeology, University of Reading. He has varied interests in the material culture and settlement archaeology of the early medieval period and is well known both as a field director and an expert in later Anglo-Saxon and Viking-age metalwork, the subject of his PhD at UCL. Previous to Lyminge, he completed a major excavation at the later Anglo-Saxon settlement at Bishopstone, Sussex, published by the Council for British Archaeology in 2010.

 

Contact admin.imems@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

 

 

Field Opportunities

Field Opportunities

Here are some details for upcoming excavations, please see contact details at the end of the email if you are interested!

The two community Archaeology Projects described below are part of the Heart of Teesdale Landscape Partnership scheme and are to be undertaken under the aegis of the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland.  Each one will be managed by staff from an appointed professional archaeological contractor who will supervise the volunteer workforce (maximum of 20 places for each).   Final discussions about the precise dates are underway but both projects will take place in the period late September – end October.

Project outlines:

Brignall Shrunken Medieval Village

The village of Brignall is one of many settlements that underwent a significant reduction in size and prosperity in the later medieval period. What are thought to be traces of former buildings and tofts have been identified on aerial photographs immediately south of the present village. There are a few fields bounded by ditches, but much of the area is disturbed with no set pattern, and no trace of house platforms. At the time of the Domesday survey, Brignall was composed of 12 carucates of land, all waste, but the village must have been of some importance in 1265 to have been granted an annual and weekly market. There were 4 mills in the village in 1712.

The project will consist of geophysical survey followed by targeted trenching to clarify the nature and extent of the remains of the medieval village.  Volunteers can be involved in both elements of the project and will receive training in archaeological excavation, survey, recording and interpretation techniques.

 

Hawkesley Hill Prehistoric Rock Art

Field research by 2000 identified four ‘panels’ of Rock Art at the western edge of Hawkesley Hill, a few miles north-west of Barnard Castle .  The motifs consist variously of cups, rings, grooves, isolated peck marks, and other more heavily eroded features some of which may actually be of natural origin.  There are also a number of earth-fast boulders nearby.

The project will entail the detailed recording of the visible Rock Art features and a search for additional examples in the vicinity both by surface inspection and by excavation.  An area around each of the principal rock outcrops bearing Rock Art will be de-turfed and excavated in order to establish if there are other potentially contemporary archaeological phenomena nearby.  Training in archaeological excavation, survey, recording and interpretation techniques.

 

Please email Belinda Burke at archandarch.dandn@durham.ac.uk

 

Researching and Representing the Early Medieval: the 2015 Richard Hall Symposium

Researching and Representing the Early Medieval: the 2015 Richard Hall Symposium

This symposium takes place on the 20th June at Kings Manor, York.  For further details of timings, cost, and booking (which is essential) details please see: http://jorvik-viking-centre.co.uk/event/researching-and-representing-the-early-medieval-the-2015-richard-hall-symposium/