Tag Archives: Medieval

Exploring Northumbria: Trip to Holy Island/Lindisfarne

We’ve just had notice of this trip that is organised by Newcastle University on Saturday. If you aren’t going to any of the many other events that we’ve recently carried notice of – in Cumbria, Lancaster, Lindisfarne (in a different guise) or Durham in previous emails to our Members and Followers – this might appeal to you. If you would like to go, please contact Dr Phillippo direct for further details through her contacts details here as soon as possible.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 02.03.2017

Dear everyone,

   Our next trip in our ‘Exploring classical and historical Northumbria’ series is this coming *Saturday* (note different day to usual), 4th March, to Holy Island and Lindisfarne Priory, one of Northumbria’s highlights. 

*Saturday* 4th March: Holy Island and Lindisfarne Priory (all day)
Start: c. 8.30.  Return by 7.35 p.m.
Cost: £9.70 for all-day NE Explorer ticket, plus any refreshments; entry to sites free.

•       From early Saxon times, the cradle of Northumbrian and British Christianity, and at the heart of Northumbria’s ‘Golden Age’; the celebrated Lindisfarne gospels were created here;
•       Stories of saints, kings and saintly kings, including mobile heads and a friendly raven; and decidedly unsaintly (and unfriendly) Vikings…
•       A tidal causeway, evocative priory ruins, and some of the best coastal scenery in England; also (from outside!) Elizabethan castle (with guest appearances in films such as ‘The Scarlet Pimpernel’…!)

For, with the flow and ebb, its style
Varies from continent to isle;         
Dry-shod, o’er sands, twice every day,
The pilgrims to the shrine find way;  
Twice every day, the waves efface  
Of staves and sandalled feet the trace.  
[…]       
Higher and higher rose to view
The castle with its battled walls.
The ancient monastery’s halls,
A solemn, huge, and dark red pile,  
Placed on the margin of the isle.  (Sir Walter Scott, *Marmion*)

Schedule: 
Meet at Haymarket bus station (outside M&S) stand Q, *no later* than 8.30 and preferably by at least 8.25 (bus leaves 8.33).
Change at Beal road end for Holy Island bus, arrive 11.05.
Explore priory ruins and museum (entry free under educational arrangement with English Heritage); also St Mary’s parish church, parts of which date back to the time of St. Aidan in the 7th C.
c. 1 p.m.: lunch in one of the local cafés (or bring your own packed lunch!)
c. 1.45: walk across the island for coastal views and a look at the Elizabethan Lindisfarne Castle (exterior only, sadly, as NT have closed it for refurbishment; still an impressive sight).
3.45 p.m.: catch bus back to Beal (safely ahead of the tide which cuts the island off twice daily!)
4-5.30: time for refreshments/food in Lindisfarne Inn before catching 17.33 bus to Newcstle (free tea/coffee refills on production of bus ticket!).
Arrive Newcastle 19.36.

*Bring warm clothing and robust footwear*: the island can be breezy even in fine weather; walking is mainly on well-marked paths but you may want to explore the shoreline and will need appropriate shoes or boots for that!

As always, you are very welcome just to turn up on the day, but it is useful to have some idea of numbers in advance so drop me an e-mail if you are interested in coming. Friends from outside the School are also welcome!

My mobile contact no. on the day: 07833 125747.  Let me know a contact number if you plan to use your own transport.
With all best wishes,
  (Dr) S. Phillippo

Further events around the CBA North region next week

CBA North News

Events continue at speed all across the CBA North region. Tonight sees the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle’s lecture on Medieval manuscripts whilst you’ll need to be quick to book by the end of this week for the Lancaster University Archaeology Forum for the first March weekend if your interests are more in the northwest of our extensive region.

We, like those manuscripts, also aim to illuminate you. In our case of what is happening across the North coming up soon. Next week, also coming at speed, covers the end of February and start of March means events of the Teesside Archaeological Society at the start of the week, the Till Valley Archaeological Society mid-week and also of the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland in the weekend as well as the Forum just mentioned.

We have details of each and all below for you to take your pick in attending. Enjoy!

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 22.02.2017

Lancaster University 44th Annual Archaeology Forum
This year’s conference includes a number of talks that may be of interest to CBA North members interested in Cumbrian archaeology. These span the archaeological periods of Roman and Medieval on particular sites across Cumbria (Maryport’s temples and Furness Abbey, in further sites in the Duddon Valley and on an early archaeologist of the Urswick area) as well as talks on drones, LIDAR and the Portable Antiquities Scheme in long-standing projects spanning the CBA North and North West regions.

You will need to be quick to book. Details of the day, including further talks, can be found online here with links to the booking system and a map for the venue itself.

Dance of Death
The mystery of our earlier email ‘The Varied Landscapes Of The CBA North Region (And Beyond)’ sent to you on the 12 February is now explained by our group member the Teesside Archaeological Society as explained by David Errickson their Chair. The next lecture, as usual the last Tuesday of the month – the 28 February – at Stockton Library at 7.30 pm, is Death and Discovery.

This lecture will be by David Dance, now a freelance archaeologist, who will discuss the use of archaeology in forensic investigation, exploring the origins of forensic archaeology and its application in criminal investigations of missing or suspected dead persons, with a practical demonstration of forensic archaeology in action.

Further details of the group, and of the speaker, can be found online through the links of their website, accessible through our own webpage in our Local Societies and Groups entry.

The next TillVAS lecture
Later that week is the next TillVAS lecture. With thanks to Maureen Charlton, their Secretary, details are given in their poster below.

Whilst Coldingham might be outside the already large CBA North region there are many Early Medieval and Medieval connections of the various religious houses here to those within CBA North which this lecture might well cover.

(If one looks at the past then suggestions have been made to include the south of Scotland with the north of England at times – not just in the 1470s, but also in the 1970s a suggestion was made to increase the CBA North region!).

Architectural and Archaeological Society lecture
Our email of the 12 February included notice of an open day in Yorkshire following investigations of a Roman road linking with our region. Belinda Burke, Secretary of the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland, another of our group members, sends us details of their next lecture which looks at another site connected by a Roman road – this time Dere Street – to our region.

Clashing dates and Future CBA North events
The 4 March, as we have covered today and in previous emails to you, will be a busy day – the Peregrini (covered in the 12 February email) and Lancaster University Conferences at opposite sides and ends of the region, in addition to the lecture immediately above, as well as CBA North Committee meeting in the morning. It is one of those days with lots clashing!

The agenda for the CBA North Committee will be finalising details for our own events with the dates we have already sent you as 29 April and 20 May – hopefully no clashes for those with anyone else, but if you don’t tell us we don’t necessarily know.

Save those dates if you can!

Hot off the press archaeological news

CBA North News

Today we have some events and notices hot off the press – we’ve notice of an open day in south-east Northumberland tomorrow, as well as the programme and notice for the opening of bookings of the ever popular annual Durham Archaeology Day on Monday. The regular events of local groups across the region, however, also continue on; Wednesday sees the next of The Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne’s series. This, and others, can be found listed in our Events page of our website.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 18.02.2017

Cresswell Community Archaeology Open-Day
Barry Mead and Archaeological Research Services write to us giving information of an open day tomorrow (Sunday) if you are in the Cresswell area of Northumberland. These excavations, whilst concentrating in the area of the Medieval pele, have revealed a range of evidence from the Mesolithic to the Modern. Details are given in the poster below.

County Durham Archaeology Day: Saturday 11 March 2017
David Mason and Tracey Donnelly of Durham County Council have provided these details of this year’s annual archaeology day in three weeks time. As ever this will be in the the Council Chamber and Durham Room, at County Hall in Durham. This year’s fascinating talks include:

– The Main Walled Garden at Auckland Castle: Repairs and Conservation.
Harry Beamish

– A Round House and a Counting House: Two Recent Historic Building Projects
Richard Annis

– Historic Building Recording at The Gates, Durham City
Tom Addyman

– Recent Archaeological Investigations in the North Pennines
Paul Frodsham

– The Balneum of Concangis: A Roman ‘villa’ Rediscovered at Chester-le-Street
David Mason

Time:             9:45am – 4:15pm

Cost:              £14.00 which includes buffet lunch, teas & coffees; £12.00 for full-time students, please let us know if you have any dietary requirements, or require a vegetarian lunch.

Tickets sell out very quickly so book early to avoid disappointment. Tickets will go on sale from 9.00am Monday 20th February.

To book and pay for a place online follow the link here and click Archaeology Day from the services listed or contact 03000 260000 if you wish to book and pay over the phone.

There will be displays by local societies and archaeological contractors as well as bookstalls in the adjacent Durham Room.

Events listed on the CBA North website
Our Events page continues to list further regular events throughout 2017. We’ll be sending out other news and notices of others events in our next email, if we can, next week.

The varied landscapes of the CBA North region (and beyond)

CBA North News

Now well into February, we are well into the programmes of the local groups and societies all across the CBA North region. As you will recall we cover everywhere between the Scottish Border south to Lancashire and Yorkshire (are we the only thing that would unite those two historic counties so flippantly?). Today we have notices for a variety of landscapes across the CBA North region (and a bit beyond as well).

 Our landscapes include a review of coastal fieldwork in 2016 as well as the announcements in Yorkshire following from previously covered investigations of  ‘Cade’s Road’ (as ‘the bit beyond’) and from Northumberland for the landscapes of the Peregrini Partnership and Hexham Abbey, with a nod to the second Tyne and Wear Heritage Forum’s annual conference in between. 

We will also be letting you know soon of the details for our main CBA North events this year. Both are planned to take place in Newcastle with the 29th April confirmed and 20 May to be confirmed; save both of these dates in your diary if you can! We always try to avoid the dates of other similar organisations where we can. Hopefully we will be able to give you more details of these, as well as recent work by the committee on your behalf, to you in our next set of emails.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 12.02.2017

Local Group Round-up: CITiZAN across CBA North
Andy Sherman and Megan Clement have written the review below of their 2016 across CBA North’s two coasts. We announced their various events throughout the course of last year, here you can see the fruits of their labours on both east and west coasts;

“In 2016 CITiZAN (the Coastal and Inter Tidal Zone Archaeology Network) ran several outreach and training events in CBA North’s region including examining a prehistoric peatshelf on the beach at Blyth, recording post-medieval saltpans in Maryport and surveying the remains of a First World War sea-plane base on Tyneside. As well as being out on the foreshore and the riverside Andy and Megan have spoken at archaeological groups, museums and heritage centres around the region discussing everything coastal.

They have also been running introductory sessions with Young Archaeologist Clubs, Duke of Edinburgh groups and Girl Guide troops, introducing the next generation of heritage enthusiasts to coastal and inter-tidal archaeology. Here our youngest trainees learn about the features you find on the foreshore and why it’s important to record them, as well as being told about some the dangers they might face if they venture into the inter-tidal zone unaccompanied. The CITiZAN North team ran a total of ten outreach and training events across Cumbria, Northumberland and Tyneside in 2016.


Members of the public brave a cold, blustery August day to talk about prehistoric submerged landscapes in Blyth

In July CITiZAN North investigated the foreshore along the Howick coast which today is known for its recreational use with coastal footpaths and holiday cottages. In the 19th century the coast was owned by the Grey family and was known for a different sort of recreation. The second Earl Grey (Charles Grey, Prime Minster from 1830-1834) built a bathing house for his children and wife. He also had two, small rock-cut pools cut into the foreshore, which would have heated up much quicker than the surrounding sea, for his family to swim in. Earlier in the summer CITiZAN identified a third rock-cut pool a short distance along the coast south of the bathing house that our volunteers helped us record.


CITiZAN volunteers and staff discuss the 2nd Earl Grey’s bathing pool on the Howick foreshore

On a sunnier day in August we investigated the lime processing industry in the Northumberland village of Beadnell. Lime is a versatile product used for a wide range of things from the building industry to agriculture. The material has been processed in Beadnell for hundreds of years with the earliest known kiln having been found on a short promontory known as Ebb’s Nook and archaeomagnetically-dated to c1480-1520 AD. Perhaps the most well-known lime kilns in Beadnell are those constructed in the late-18th century by John Wood and later converted to smoke fish in the 19th century.

A short distance north of the harbour is a lime kiln eroding out of the edge of Dell Point, one of four kilns marked on an estate map of 1759. CITiZAN’s volunteers photographed and drew the remains of this kiln preserving it in record before it is fully destroyed by the sea.

CITiZAN staff and volunteers establishing a section line early in the morning so that a scale drawing of the remains of the Dell Point lime kiln can be made

As part of the training sessions our volunteers are show how to use our app, which can be downloaded on to Apple and Android devices such as smart phones and tablets. The app enables people to record, photograph and geo-locate archaeological features they find on the foreshore.  As well as allowing people to explore our interactive map and discover heritage sites along the English coast.


A CITiZAN volunteer recording part of the submerged forest at Howick using the projects app

Over the summer CITiZAN filmed three television programmes on the archaeology of the coast for Channel 4. The first of these programmes was filmed along the Northumberland coast featuring heritage sites in Beadnell and Howick including the lime kilns and rock-cut bathing pools mentioned above. The programme also featured the wreck of the early-20th century French fishing trawler the Tadorne. Little remains of the wreck on the foreshore now, although part of the partially salvaged boiler from the trawler can be seen rearing above the jagged rocks of the foreshore at low tide.


Filming with cast and crew of Britain at Low Tide at the wreck of the Tadorne

The three television programmes can still be download from More4 if you would like to watch them.  If you are interested in exploring and recording the heritage of England’s coastline you can download our app here.

To keep up to date with the exciting events CITiZAN North are hosting around the coast of the north of England visit: this page“.

Andy Sherman and Megan Clement
CITiZAN, 08.02.2017

[As a stop-press footnote addition to the review Andy also writes “We’re currently looking at several events in the CBA North’s region and are slowly ironing out the various permissions, timings etc. We’ll keep you updated on progress”. Watch this space for more details, Ed.].

Thornton le Street Heritage Lottery Fund Project
John Sheenan writes to tell us that;

“Thornton le Street History Group are launching their Heritage Lottery Fund supported archaeology and history project with an open day to be held in the village hall on Saturday 18th February between 10.00 am and 4.00 pm. Anyone interested in participating is invited to come along, see what is involved and register their interest.
 
Thornton le Street is a typical Vale of York village with extensive evidence of early occupation. The project will study the history of the village and its surrounding area which contains a substantial Scheduled Monument site, a watermill, a river ford, an early church, and landed estates. Two Roman roads are said to converge at this point and it is hoped to resolve whether the village is Roman or medieval in origin.
 
Jim Brightman of Solstice Heritage, who recently led a community archaeology project at Kiplin Hall in the nearby Vale of Mowbray, will supervise the project which will be of 18 months duration. Training and practical experience will be provided in archaeological fieldwork and historical documentary research. The latest digital recording will be used which will be incorporated into a bespoke website which will be developed by the participants.  
 
If you cannot attend on the day, a project synopsis is available on the village website or you can contact John Sheehan on 01609 771878 or at jgsheehan@btinternet.com“.

Events listed on the CBA North website
Our Events page has now settled for a while. Though many of the February events have been and gone, there are a few still to come in the regular programmes of the Lunesdale and Teesside Archaeological Societies covering the Neolithic of the northwest, as well as the mysteriously titled Dance of Death.

Please let us know any questions, comments or information that you have or want publicising by emailing cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org. We have been emailed the three announcements of more one-off events below which you might be interested in. Versions of these posters, which you can download, if you wish to click the links, circulate yourself to your own group’s members or wish to book up, can be found in our blog and website versions of this email.

Peregrini Landscape Partnership Conference

The download-able version of this poster can be found here.

Tyne and Wear Heritage Forum: 2nd Annual Conference
We have been told that the Tyne & Wear Heritage Forum’s event this year will be on Saturday, May 13th 2017, at the Wallsend Memorial Hall. Further information on this day will be available soon.

Hexham Abbey Day School
Members will recount that some of our previous AGMs have been held at Hexham which covered plans for further display and interpretation of the buildings of the abbey. Looking further ahead – to July this time. You will notice, however, that there are advantages in planning ahead as an early bird discount (till the end of March) is offered.


Once again we’ve included a download-able version of this for you – this can be found here as Hexham day school. This includes the booking form on the second page of what is evidently designed to be as a folded leaflet as well.

We were sent details of this last event by Chris Tolan-Smith and Jo Shoebridge; please feel free to let us any information that you may want publicising as well.

Morecambe Bay training tomorrow and woodland archaeo-wanders

CBA North News

Our latest issue once again spans the variety of the CBA North region – this is not quite the last email of 2016 to you, as a further one is to come yet. Today’s issue has some last minute news of some training tomorrow and two further round-ups from local groups. (There is no system in play here – we move from the A of Appleby’s in the last issue to B’s this time with Bernicia and Border).

Again we span the geographical expanse of our region from Morecambe Bay in our southwest to the northeast in Northumberland for the varied field-based and recording work by the Bernician Studies Group, as well hearing what Berwick-based lectures the Border Archaeological Group have been enjoying during 2016 and what their members can look forward to 2017.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
19.12.2016

Morecambe Bay: training tomorrow (and other dates)
[Louise Brown of the Morecambe Bay Partnership has written to us giving details of some further training events with one tomorrow. You will recall that previous training has been in geophysical surveying carried out as part of the same project during the summer. Please contact Louise if you would like any further details, Ed.]

Hello,

As part of the Headlands to Headspace Landscape Partnership Scheme, currently being delivered by Morecambe Bay Partnership, we have arranged some further free training in documentary research for volunteers. The workshops have been organised for Kendal (20th December, 10th and 17th January), Arnside (7th and 14th January) and Barrow (28th January and 4th February). The training is hosted by Dr Richard Newman of Wardell Armstrong Archaeology (formerly the Cumbria County Archaeologist), is Bay themed and will introduce research techniques for desk-based archaeological study. We hope to get volunteers to contribute to desk-based reports focused on specific themes/topics as part of the training.

The link to our website for further information and booking a free place can be found here:

http://www.morecambebay.org.uk/events/understanding-bay-documentary-research-training

Kind regards
Louise Martin
H2H Cultural Heritage Officer
Morecambe Bay Partnership

Mobile: 07760881581
Office: 01539 734888
Follow us on Twitter: @H2H_Tweets

Local group round-up 1; If you go down to the woods today…
…but not for a picnic, you may learn about a possible ancient Northumbrian woodland boundary zone. Members of the Bernician Studies Group are looking at an area between Wansbeck and Coquet in Northumberland. We call the study Cocwudu, a name recorded in the History of Saint Cuthbert at the end of the 11th century. The word seems to be a re-formation of the river-name Coquet and Old English wudu, meaning woodland.

Place name elements such as Old English hryst, leah, sceaga and wudu, as in Coquetdale at Morrelhirst, Horsley, Lordenshaw and Witton, provide clues of a long-gone forested area.

During the last two years, members have checked many likely locations for plants which indicate ancient semi-natural woodland. We are noting the common ones such as Wood Anemone and Dog’s Mercury, and rarer ones such as Herb Paris and Toothwort. Most of these woodlands only survive in outlying places, along steep and inaccessible sides of streams and rivers. We look for evidence of woodland management in the past, such as pollarding and coppicing.

We are also studying historic township boundaries using the 1860s Ordnance Survey maps at the Literary and Philosophical Society library in Newcastle. We are also looking at the Brinkburn and Newminster Cartularies for evidence of Medieval arable and animal management, forests and hunting. Some members have been translating selected charters from Latin into English. Experts associated with Newcastle and Durham universities are guiding the work.

The Bernician Studies Group is closely associated with Explore, the Newcastle-based independent lifelong learning programme. Explore offers an exciting range of classes and lectures in philosophy, art, history and archaeology, literature, science and more, which are open to all. Their spring programme starts on 16th January 2017.

More information on the group can be found at www.bernicianstudies.eu.

Bridget Gubbins and the Bernician Studies Group
12.12.2016

Local group round-up 2; Border Archaeological Society
BAS have enjoyed an excellent programme of lectures during 2016. Beginning with Joanna Hambly, we learned about 150 years of documentation of the Pictish carvings at Weymss Caves before Chris Fowler of Newcastle University described Early Bronze Age Burial Practices in North East England and South East Scotland. We then had a tour of the Sahara with Tertia Barnett who spoke of the rock carvings to be found there. She was followed by Jeremy Paterson who described the Roman economy. Our last speaker before the summer break was Dr Jane Webster, founder of a Young Archaeologists Club in Newcastle speaking about the University’s work with young people. This was especially pertinent now that A-level Archaeology is to be a thing of the past*.

In September, Myra Giesen spoke about Mortuary Archaeology. She was followed by Elidh Ferguson of the Face Lab at Liverpool Sir John Moores University, stepping in admirably for Professor Caroline Wilkinson, who held the audience enthralled as she described how facial images are reconstructed from the skull*. Colleen Batey spoke with great knowledge and enthusiasm about Pagan Viking Burial in November. Professor Clive Bonsall wound up this year’s lecture series with a talk on his work on Mesolithic shell middens on the east coast of Scotland in the “Obanian Problem”.

In 2017, we welcome Fraser Hunter and Andrew Birley talking about the Celts and Vindolanda respectively. They are followed by Tatiana Ivleva talking about Iron Age and Roman period glass bangles. The following three talks are on local topics: Paul Gething on Bradford Kaims, Jenny Proctor on Needle’s Eye and Ian Kille on how the local geology has shaped its history. Andrea Dolfini will speak on reconstructed Bronze Age fighting styles followed by Richard Carlton on recent discoveries on Lindisfarne. Our President, Lindsay Allason-Jones somewhat enigmatically, will wind up the programme by asking whether Hadrian’s Wall is archaeological site or an artistic muse.

Josie McChrystal and the Border Archaeological Society
14.12.2016

[*As footnotes to this review, CBA North Members and Followers will recall that we earlier sent round notice of a petition for the reprieve of A-Level Archaeology during October; this was recently debated in Parliament, but the subject is not safe yet, see https://www.change.org/p/aqa-save-a-level-archaeology for an update. Furthermore the recent facial reconstruction of Robert the Bruce reported in the media – see https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/dec/08/sprucing-up-robert-the-bruce-scottish-kings-face-gets-3d-treatment – was carried out using the techniques described in the lecture. All of which shows the value of local groups and their lectures, Ed.]

Further Contributions
[If others or other groups would like to contribute something to our newsletter emails please do so and send something in. Contributions are edited as little as possible and can include a few choice pictures – we don’t have to run in alphabetical order for the local round-up’s of the local groups – and we’ll publicise all the events known to us at the start of the New Year which is by tradition our most widely read email and circulated website page, Ed.]

Short notice of these events this week

CBA North News

Some short notice of other events happening this week for you here. Contact details for these events are given for responding directly with the organisers. Notices of other events will come your way, as planned, later in the month as well.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
05.10.2016

Historic Gardens of Durham

This talk is Friday and is organised by the Bow Trust. If you would like to attend please RSVP to membership@thebowtrust.co.uk – non-members will be asked to make a small donation to cover catering costs.

Exploring Classical/Historical Northumbria: a programme of trips

Dear everyone,

Throughout 2016/17 we shall again be running a series of trips exploring Newcastle and the surrounding area: often asking “What’s Classical about Newcastle and Northumbria?” but also exploring the area’s considerable and colourful post- (and occasionally pre-) classical history. Costs are kept low: travel is normally by public transport (generally very good value) and for most sites free entry will be arranged, often under special educational group schemes.

This year’s programme will include star attraction Hadrian’s Wall (twice!), Wallington Hall, Alnwick, Warkworth & Brancepeth Castles, Hexham and many others, including hopefully Holy Island/Lindisfarne (tides permitting!)….

For a few glimpses of what the trips are like, you can have a look at the following web-page:

http://www.ncl.ac.uk/historical/students/studentlife/ExploringNorthumbria.htm

Our first trip is *this coming Sunday*, 9th Oct., to Arbeia Roman Fort at South Shields: details to follow.

Programme for term 1:
1. **Sunday 9th October**: Arbeia Roman Fort, South Shields (afternoon)
Details to follow, but briefly: depart Haymarket Metro 12.30 p.m., return c. 5 p.m.

2. Sunday 23rd October: Wallington Hall (afternoon)
•       fine Palladian country house and gardens (partly designed by Capability Brown) reflecting the neo-classical ideas and ideals of the 18th century;
•       under Lady Pauline Trevelyan, 19th-C focus of an intellectual and artistic circle who left their mark in the remarkable painted Roman-style atrium at the heart of the house, and also in English literature and in the radical liberal politics of the day;
•      impressive house interior – including collection of model armies and fully-furnished dolls’ houses!

3. Sunday 13th November:  Hadrian’s Wall 1: Walltown Crags and Greenhead (all day, returning late afternoon/early evening)
•       An introduction to the Wall: a circular walk along one of its most dramatic stretches from Walltown Quarry.  Wet weather alternative in Roman Army Museum!
•       Greenhead village and ruins of Thirlwall Castle with its legends of buried treasure and a magical dwarf!

4. Sunday 27th November:  Brancepeth castle and church (afternoon)
•       Impressive stronghold dating from pre-Norman times, home to the powerful Neville family (of Warwick the Kingmaker fame); not normally accessible to the public, but open on this occasion for a Christmas craft fair!
•       historic church, gathering point for ill-fated 16thC ‘Rising of the North’.

5. Sunday 4th December (provisional):  Hexham town and Abbey (afternoon)
•       Hexham: historic town with striking medieval buildings and links to a major battle in the Wars of the Roses
•       Impressive Abbey dating back to c. 674 AD, with original Saxon crypt constructed from recycled Roman stones.

To come in terms 2 and 3: in progress, but including:

Hadrian’s Wall 2 (May Day Bank Holiday Monday)
Bamburgh
Alnwick
Warkworth
Hopefully (tides permitting!) Holy Island/Lindisfarne

Details are circulated by e-mail, on the website and via social media as the term goes along.  Everyone is welcome including friends from other Schools or even outside the university.  You can just turn up on the day, but it is useful for me to have a rough idea of numbers, so when you receive news of each trip please do e-mail me in advance if you are definitely interested.

With all best wishes,
(Dr) S. Phillippo

Please contact Dr Phillippo direct through her email address susanna.phillippo@ncl.ac.uk if you are interested in attending any of these events.

October 2016’s calendar of regular society events
3 October – Depicting the Dead: an insight into craniofacial analysis for forensic identification and archaeological investigation, Dr Eilidh Ferguson [BAS]
8 October – Death on the Nile: Uncovering Lives and the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt [NEAES]
9 October – Bosworth 1485, Dr Glenn Foard [TILLVAS]
13 October – Mapping the Medieval Landscape of Cumbria, Dr Caron Newman [APPLEBY]
16 October – David Dippie Dixon Memorial Lectures: William Boyd and Controversy as well as Neanderthal Hunting and animal avoidance strategies, Professor Mark White [CCA]
19 October – The archaeology of St John Lateran and the transformation of Rome from Septimius Severus to Constantine, Professor Ian Haynes [ARCH & ARCH]
25 October – Children of the Revolution, Dr Becky Gowland [TAS]
26 October – Kirkharle, Rothley and Alnwick: the three Northumberland landscapes of Capability Brown, Nick Owen [SANT]

Details as to times and venues for all these events can be found in our Local Societies and Groups page (‘https://cbanorth.wordpress.com/local-societies-and-groups/‘) of our website.

Putting flesh on the bare bones of history

CBA North News

Another month has all too quickly passed by, but all that means is another month of lectures and events to look forward to as well. This email is something of a bumper issue of notices for forthcoming events – kicking off on the 3rd with others again in the forthcoming weeks. Once again these are spread across the region, and a bit further beyond, dealing with subjects and locations familiar as well as distant in time and space.

As of yesterday’s Committee meeting it was thought that if anyone, or any local groups, would like to report their own news or announce their forthcoming events to a wider audience across the whole of the CBA North region, please send us such information and material (ideally with a picture or two).

We already have notices of other further events in October, as well as two events – outside of the usual society regular events – for November (which we will aim to send out later this month).

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
02.10.2016

Depicting the Dead
Lectures put flesh on the bare bones of history – and this one of BAS does more than most.

Dr Eilidh Ferguson studied Forensic Anthropology at the University of Dundee before a PhD in juvenile facial identification. She is currently working as a postdoctoral research assistant studying adult facial identification from photographic images and is a Royal Anthropological Institute certified forensic anthropologist involved in forensic casework both in the UK and abroad.

The region is very familiar with anatomical and osteoarchaeological research as the illustration from William Greenwell’s British Barrows shows.

Death on the Nile
Death is also the subject of the North East Ancient Egypt Society’s mini-study in Durham next Saturday, 8 October, as well. In this case a series of three speakers will be dealing with coffin types and decoration. See the NEAES website for more details. This is free to members, but for non-members this will be £5.

Bosworth 1485
The full reconstruction of an archaeological battlefield may, however, be a little way off yet. However the rediscovery of one – Bosworth in Leicestershire – itself is the subject of the next Till Valley Archaeological Society lecture next weekend.

IA Rhouses

The work in relocating this battlefield, previously thought known, is very like TillVAS’s own involvement in the Flodden500 project. Details for booking a place at this lecture are given above, but visitors are welcome to any of the other TillVAS regular lectures to December that are already listed in our Events website page.

Resuming regular local society lectures
Hard on the heels of these events the lectures of the Northumberland Archaeological Group (NAG) resume in Newcastle on the 12th October when Rob Young will talk on ‘Excavations at Derwentcote: a Study in Nineteenth Century Workers’ Housing’, whilst the first of the Appleby Archaeology Group when other local fieldwork ‘Mapping the Medieval landscape of Cumbria’ by Dr Caron Newman will be the following day in Appleby.

The further events of these both these groups – in the case of the Appleby Archaeology Group up to April 2017 – can also be found in our Events (‘https://cbanorth.wordpress.com/events/‘) page of the website.

October 2016’s calendar of regular society events
3 October – Depicting the Dead: an insight into craniofacial analysis for forensic identification and archaeological investigation, Dr Eilidh Ferguson [BAS]
8 October – Death on the Nile: Uncovering Lives and the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt [NEAES]
9 October – Bosworth 1485, Dr Glenn Foard [TILLVAS]
13 October – Mapping the Medieval Landscape of Cumbria, Dr Caron Newman [APPLEBY]
16 October – David Dippie Dixon Memorial Lectures: William Boyd and Controversy as well as Neanderthal Hunting and animal avoidance strategies, Professor Mark White [CCA]
19 October – The archaeology of St John Lateran and the transformation of Rome from Septimius Severus to Constantine, Professor Ian Haynes [ARCH & ARCH]
25 October – Children of the Revolution, Dr Becky Gowland [TAS]
26 October – Kirkharle, Rothley and Alnwick: the three Northumberland landscapes of Capability Brown, Nick Owen [SOCANTS]

Details as to times and venues for all these events can be found in our Local Societies and Groups page of the website.