Tag Archives: Festival of Archaeology

CBA North: July edition (Festival of Archaeology and more)

CBA North News

Dear Members and Friends of CBA North,

As we sure you are all well aware and need no reminding these are unprecedented times. International and national events, as well as regional and local ones, have been cancelled and postponed across the CBA North region. We hope that you, yours and your groups all are well, and continue to remain so, as we all are somewhat confined in our actions.

Many practices, procedures and pieces of work have changed and changed again in the current circumstances – several drafts of CBA North email news have been started since the end of March only to be changed and changed again as the situation has changed. Opening hours, hours of work and staff changes, however, have all been thrown into sharp focus for all of us. In a sobering article Marta Alberti of The Vindolanda Trust explains what is happening at Vindolanda in what had been planned as its 50th anniversary year. There are ways that you can help the trust and others again as lockdown arrangements ease.

However other work continues on – just in different forms and often in different locations to normal. The CBA Festival of Archaeology is one such change, with its many digital offerings starting on Saturday for its first appearance this year and details of this are below. Some groups within the CBA North network have started to hold digital lectures, whilst others continue to produce their own normal (and indeed extra) newsletters and emails for members. Quizzes and other digital content has been seen again. Gill Goodfellow of the West Cumbria Archaeology Society has sent an article in linking across to digital content which all can access, whilst CBA National and others have put more (or made more freely available) content online given the general inaccessibility of some libraries and archives.

Some groups are also using the time to plan, as well as revise websites and website pages for the future, for a newer normal. It is heartening to see such activity, productivity and continued interests in archaeology, history and heritage in these unusual times. There is so much digital content online to make choices is invidious, but if something stands out for you or you wish to publicise something please let us know so we all can enjoy it.

CBA North has been full of busy behind the scenes as well – our apologies for not being outwardly busy to you as members. Committee has met twice by email to discuss various matters, new members – including a new group member (TillVAS whose many activities we’ve often publicised in our emails to you) – have joined our number since our last email to you. Queries regarding membership, of and from our previous publications as well as general archaeology been answered for students and home-schoolers. Virtual meetings, updating and work with other regional and national bodies have also been done regarding what happening across the CBA North region with our regional overview.

Please join in us welcoming all our new members. Feel free to circulate this email and its links to non-members, and around your local group’s membership – this can be done through the ‘Forward to a friend’ link in the side bar and/or the website version of this email. Who knows they too may be also interested in joining our number?

Feedback, questions and/or comments most welcome at any time – either direct or through your local group representatives – to us; this is your group after all. A fresh survey, prompted by Covd-19, from CBA National asks what help and support your local groups need. CBA North is also taking stock and considering the future as well for our next five year plan, so we all would be most grateful if you would contribute your thoughts to the survey.

Best wishes – stay safe and well, we’ll be back with some more news soon,

CBA North Committee
10.07.2020

CBA National news
1) Festival of Archaeology 2020

This year’s festival comes in two parts, and the first of those start on Saturday.

Over 100 events and activities over the next 9 days

From 11-19 July 2020, the CBA is trying something new – a digital Festival of Archaeology
 
With live events on hold at the moment, we decided not to cancel our usual summer programme of archaeology events, but instead stage an online festival of interactive talks, competitions, youth activities and other engaging archaeology content.   

We were unsure whether people would be willing to join us in trying something brand new at short notice, but the response has been astonishing. There are now over 100 events listed on the festival website – something for every archaeology lover to enjoy, and lots more for curious minds to discover. 

We would be delighted to see you there. Here are just a few of the highlights:

Launch event – Saturday 11 July

Join the Council for British Archaeology as we launch the 2020 Festival of Archaeology with a day of online activity.

There are four free interactive online sessions – register now! Join Time Team’s Phil Harding as he takes you on a tour of Wessex Archaeology’s environmental laboratory, learn about the domestication of plants, find out how to make amazing 3D models and join our student careers session to discover routes to studying and working in archaeology. 

Alex Langlands: Digitally reconstructing excavations at Old Sarum – 12 July
Frustrated at not being able to get out and excavate this year? So is archaeoogist and TV presenter Alex Langlands. Join Alex as he digitally reconstructs the 1912 and 1913 excavations of Old Sarum’s cathedral site. Register now.

Podcast Sunday Chat – Archaeology and the Climate Change Conundrum – 19 July
Tune in for a chat on the impacts of climate change on archaeology with our hosts Career in Ruins. Guests Caroline Barrie-Smith (CITiZAN), Neil Redfern (CBA), Hannah Fluck (HE) and Rachel Bynoe (University of Southampton) present a fantastic perspective in this discussion on where archaeology stands in the climate change crisis debate. Podcast will appear here.

The campaigns of Septimius Severus in the far north of Britain – 14 July
Dr Simon Elliott, one of the world’s leading experts on the Severan campaigns in modern Scotland looks at the failed campaigns of Septimius Severus in AD 209 and AD 210. Register now.

Bacon Sandwiches and Stonehenge: Connecting Local Youth with Heritage Sites – 16 July
This live discussion will focus on how heritage sites can best support local youth organisations, and examine the ‘Our Stones’ documentary film project led by young people from Durrington Youth at Stonehenge in 2019. Register now.

An Archaeological Safari into No Man’s Sky – 17 July
Find out about the fascinating world of archaeogaming. Join digital archaeologist Dr. Andrew Reinhard (University of York and New York University) on a live-streamed archaeological safari to visit the dusty corners of past human civilizations in video game No Man’s Sky. Watch on Twitch. You can also tour the Mortonia Minecraft server in our other archaeogaming event.

Bristol’s Brilliant Archaeology: Archaeology and the Historic Environment – 13 July
Explore the work of Bristol’s Historic Environment Officer and find out about Know Your Place, an interactive digital mapping resource that lets members of the public explore and contribute to layers of history in counties across South West England. Register now.

This is just a snapshot – there are many more talks and lectures on the festival website!

Have you ever wondered what archaeologists really do?  Do they just dig or are there other aspects to their work?

A Day in Archaeology, delivered in conjunction with the Royal Archaeological Institute, showcases “a day in the life” of archaeologists from all over the UK and this year’s event will be taking place on Monday 13 July 2020. Blog posts are uploaded throughout A Day In Archaeology and stay on the Festival website site all year round to form a developing resource for anyone interested in a career in archaeology or wanting to find out more about the range of opportunities to participate. You even have time to add your own!

The 2020 #AskAnArchaeologist Day will be on Wednesday 15 July 2020 – get your questions ready! #AskAnArchaeologist Day is a chance for people from all over the world to ask archaeologists questions, and an opportunity for archaeologists to share their knowledge. Anyone with access to Twitter can ask a question using the #AskAnArchaeologist hashtag and any archaeologist who has an answer is encouraged to respond. Follow the Ask An Archaeologist Day and CBA Twitter accounts to follow the action.
The Council for British Archaeology will be delivering a series of day long events, including the #YouthTakeover, A Day in ArchaeologyAsk an Archaeologist and our Young Archaeologists’ Day. We will be joined by Professor Carenza Lewis (from Time Team) as part of our ongoing Dig School project, Wessex Archaeology will be delivering our Environmental Archaeology Day with careers advice, skills training and a special YAC 3D handling session. Plus you will have the chance to have your artwork turned into a published comic!

This year we have also joined forces with English Heritage to co-create the youth-focused Festival events, as part of the Shout Out Loud project. They are a major partner in this year’s Digital Festival of Archaeology and will be delivering exciting and creative events for audiences aged 11-25. Shout Out Loud is funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund through its #KicktheDust programme designed to encourage and involve more young people in heritage. Below you can find out more about the project, our partnership and lots of great events aimed at our younger Festival audience.

There’s still time to enter our Festival competitions

Don’t forget to get your entries in for our #RubbishArt and Archaeology Showreel competitions. 

We’ll be sharing a range of entries via our social media channels and there are some great prizes on offer. What are you waiting for – get your entries in now! 

Both of our competitions are open to entrants of all ages. Please make sure you read the terms and conditions before entering, these can be found by following the competition links above.

Festival feedback

We want to know what you think! It’s really important that we give you the opportunity to let us know what you think of the Festival, what you enjoyed the most, what you’d like to see more of and what you think we might be able to do better. This year it’s even more important that we get your opinions as it’s the first time we have hosted a digital Festival. 

You can share your thoughts with us by completing our feedback survey after you have attended an event. 
You can access the survey here.

If you’re an event organiser you can find all of the evaluation information including survey links and some handy guidance notes in the Organiser section of the Festival website.

Support the Festival! 

The CBA is a small charity, reliant on donations and our membership to keep the festival going. We would be delighted if you would support us with a small donation, or even better, consider joining us – you’ll get six issues a year of British Archaeology magazine and access to our full digital archive if you do! Find our how to support us below. Thank you.

Enjoy the Festival! 

We hope you have a fantastic 9 days discovering all the Festival has to offer and we look forward to seeing you at a digital event soon!

The 50th Anniversary of The Vindolanda Trust
Marta Alberti, of The Vindolanda Trust, has written of what is happening at Vindolanda. This well-known Roman site in Northumberland has many national and international connections, as well as the site of many excavations. 2020 is the 50th anniversary of the trust, in what was going to be a year to remember Marta now describes of further happenings as enforced by the changing CV-19 situation. This article was written at the start of lockdown, and like many places there have been changes again since.

Please consider how you can support such appeals and venues if you can, as well as your local groups activities, in the future.

‘On the 1st of April 2020, the Vindolanda Trust celebrated its 50th anniversary. Established in 1970 with the aim to excavate, research and share with the public the Roman remains in its care, the Vindolanda Trust has spent the last 50 years providing opportunities for amateurs and professionals alike to immerse themselves in history and archaeology. Great plans were afoot to celebrate the last 50 years of discoveries, and get ready for the next 50. However, in an unprecedented event, on 20th March 2020 the Vindolanda Trust had to close its doors to both Roman Vindolanda and the Roman Army Museum in response to the fight against COVID-19.

Work continues behind the scenes, to ensure that everyone can virtually enjoy the sites and that the Trust can continue in its mission. For example, new home learning resources have been (and will continue to be) updated on the Trust’s website.  The Trust’s social media presence is stronger than ever, with the Communications’ Manager now living on site, and providing all important gorgeous images. Our new excavation HQ is on site, ready to welcome its first volunteers as soon as it is safe to do so.

But to keep this work going, and to make sure that the Trust are there to welcome you when these testing are times are over, we still need everyone’s help.  ALL the Trust’s operating income comes from admissions to our sites, spend in our shops and cafes and from donations. The majority of that has now stopped: to attempt to compensate for this incredible loss, the Trust have launched a survival appeal, in the form of an unusual, online birthday party. Consider helping by donating the equivalent of a pair of warm socks, or a bunch of flowers, or some fizz.

If you would have visited, please purchase the special edition golden ticket, which celebrates the Trust’s anniversary. This will give you unlimited visiting rights until December 2021!  The Trust, just like the CBA, has long been committed to be at the forefront of research, public engagement and participation in history and archaeology, and looks forward to re-opening its doors to you, and to the world, as soon as possible’.

A West Cumbria Archaeology Society (WCAS) update
Gill Campbell has written an update of a recent Cumbrian activities by the WCAS group. This links into events and projects previously carried out by the group which have featured in our emails to you. She writes;

‘As part of the ongoing Holme Cultram Harbour Lottery Funded project, WCAS organised a weekend of experimental Medieval iron smelting led by Dave Watson from Moor Forge near Wigton. The furnace was built in advance with local clay to give it time to dry out. The charcoal was produced in the Lake District and the iron ore was from Florence Mine, Egremont.

Saturday was a trial run, firing the furnace to make sure all was ok. On Sunday morning Dave lit the furnace and attached a jet of air to bring it up to in excess of 1000°C. Due to a shortage of medieval serfs to pump bellows an adapted vacuum cleaner was used throughout the smelt. Once the furnace was up to temperature it was loaded throughout the day with alternate buckets of charcoal and cups of iron ore – a total of approximately 40 over the duration of the process.

During the day slag was tapped from the bottom to avoid the level getting too high and after 4/5 hours the charcoal level was allowed to drop, the final slag was tapped and the furnace dismantled to reveal the lump of bloom in the bottom. The bloom was removed from the kiln, hammered whilst still malleable to consolidate it and then successfully tested with a magnet to show the iron content.

As a result of the project the Society has a good sized piece of bloom for reference as well as a lot of information about the process which will be very useful as we continue to research the industrial processes that went on in the vicinity of Holme Cultram Abbey. We already have plans drawn up for when we are able to get back in the field!

WCAS would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund for making this experiment possible. Big thanks to Dave Watson for hosting and working so hard to make it successful, Darrell for his advice from the USA as well as Terry, Adam and Pete who helped on the day. For more information about the smelting there is a short YouTube video of the day covering all stages of the project. This can be found here.

CBA National news
2) Recharging British Archaeology: your chance to take part

The CBA has recently secured support from Historic England’s COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund for a project to help rebuild public participation in archaeology as we recover from the effects of the pandemic. Cancelled projects, loss of income, worries about volunteer capacity and the need to plan for different ways of working in future are just some of the problems that groups have faced. There are distinct challenges for those working with children and young people, as well as those with an older membership.


Through this project, the CBA will use its knowledge and skills to support as many organisations as possible to help rebuild public participation in archaeology. We will listen to what organisations need so that we can offer small-scale immediate support and – most importantly –  plan a future programme of activity and funding bids which will enable us to help recharge community archaeology over the coming months and years.

The first step is to start a conversation with local and regional societies and groups, including our YAC branches and member organisations, to find out how you have been affected and what help you would welcome from us.

Please take a few minutes to give us your views by completing our survey here.

There is a separate survey for those involved with YAC Groups here.

Based on these conversations, we will be able to plan some immediate support to help the sector recover. This might include online training, toolkits, mentoring or one-to-one advice sessions. We will finalise the details of this offer based on what you tell us you need.

The insight we gain from these conversations will also enable us to undertake detailed planning work for future CBA projects to extend our Youth Engagement work, develop new forms of volunteering, plan a possible future small grants scheme and improve our digital infrastructure.

At the CBA, we know that we need to change the way we work as an organisation in response to the ongoing crisis. This project will help us ensure that we do this in a way which helps as many organisations as possible offer new and continuing opportunities for people to enjoy archaeology.

CBA North: July (Festival of Archaeology) special issue

CBA North News
As many of you will know the Festival of Archaeology for this year, till the 28 July, has now started – as has, at times, severe rain showers. Nonetheless across our region are a number of events planned. Indeed one of those events is today. Gillian Waters, the Festival Coordinator at CBA National, explains what is happening nationally below.

This year’s theme is archaeology and technology with some of our own local group members who have organised their own events to coincide with the Festival. Details of those events are given special mention below, but all link into technology – whether of that past or those of the present looking into the past – in some way. Other events, of course, are also happening and Pete Jackson has sent us details of a further event this Saturday. The 2019 Hadrian’s Wall Pilgrimage also starts Saturday, so lots of things happening and across CBA North-land to cater for all tastes.

Best wishes for the summer,

CBA North Committee
17.07.2019

Festival of Archaeology 2019
Gillian, as Festival Coordinator, writes; ‘The Festival of Archaeology is a UK-wide annual two-week event, coordinated by the Council for British Archaeology. It showcases the work of archaeologists and encourages people of all ages and abilities to engage with their own locality and heritage through archaeology. This year’s Festival will take place from 13 to 28 July 2019 and features special events hosted by hundreds of organisations across the UK with hidden sites to explore and new techniques to learn, with talks, tours, workshops, re-enactments, and activities for the archaeologically inclined of all ages.

This year the Council for British Archaeology is also organising on-line festival events – so that no matter where you are you can get involved in the Festival of Archaeology. On 17 July [today!] the CBA partners with the National Trust for #AskanArchaeologist. This live Twitter event gives you the chance to put your question to archaeologists from across the UK. On Youth Takeover Day on 22 July, our band of dedicated volunteers will be masterminding and coordinating the Council for British Archaeology’s social media streams. Volunteers will also be helping behind the scenes on A Day in Archaeology which takes place on the same day. Archaeologists will be showcasing the enormous variety of exciting career and volunteering opportunities that are available, as they post their own blogs and share details of their work.

Find out more details of the Festival on our website https://festival.archaeologyuk.org.

Whatever events you get involved with during the Festival of Archaeology let us know about it via social media with the hashtag #FestivalofArchaeology. You can keep up-to-the-minute with what is happening by keeping an eye to our own social media presences as per below;

Twitter: @archaeologyuk
Facebook: /archaeologyuk
Instagram: @archaeologyuk

To find out more about the work of the Council for British Archaeology visit our website: 
https://new.archaeologyuk.org/. For more information contact the CBA office on 01904 671417 or email festival2019@archaeologyuk.org.

If anyone wants more details that might be unavailable online, please feel free to email Gillian at gillianwaters@archaeologuk.org.

CBA North’s local group members: their own Festival activities
Some of our own local group members are running Festival activities this year across the region. These are by the Appleby Archaeology Group, the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland, as well as the Bamburgh Research Project.

Members who were at our 2016 Corbridge AGM will recall the two presentations following the AGM business by Martin Joyce of the Appleby Archaeology Group and Phil Bowyer of Tynedale Archaeology. Martin outlined the plans for the Dig Appleby project which this year continues in Dig Appleby Digging Deeper at two Medieval burgage plots at the site of the almshouses known as Saint Anne’s Hospital. If you wish to take part in the excavations, you will need to book – but visitors are welcome at any time. Further details can be found here.

Phil, back in 2016, outlined the recent work by his group in the Tynedale area, which has now extended into adjoining Redesdale. The prehistoric site at Rattenraw which the group has surveyed and reported here is now being excavated as part of the Revitalising Redesdale Landscape Partnership; this excavation is also open to volunteers, but again requires booking if you want to be involved. Contact details for this excavation can be found in the Festival’s pages here.

These events are happening next week, but in the meantime there are events this weekend as well. The Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland are holding their monthly lecture looking at more recent investigations of old technology.

Please note that this lecture is not in the usual location where the society holds it meetings, and later than normal also, but will be at Alington House as indicated in the poster above. Directions can be found on the Festival’s website pages here for those unfamiliar with Durham.

Meanwhile the Bamburgh Research Project‘s 2019 season is continuing. During the weekend there are a number of half-day tutorials on environmental archaeology using modern technology to examine the past and its varied technologies. For this you will also need to book; the Saturday is reportedly booking up fast, but in case you are interested there are also Sunday sessions available. Please contact the project through the details of this page if you are interested in taking part.

A new future for mining in the North Pennines?
Also technologically related Pete Jackson has sent us notes of a forthcoming meeting also on Saturday looking to establish another local group in the area. He writes a meeting will be from 1100 to 1430 at the Upper Weardale Town Hall at St Johns Chapel.

‘The purpose of the meeting is to discuss a proposal about setting up a new group for the North Pennines to share information, advice and opinions about the North Pennines mining industries. For this meeting we are defining the North Pennines Orefield as east of the River Eden, south of Hadrian’s Wall, west of the North East Coalfield and north of the Stainmore Pass.

It is proposed that such a group could facilitate the sharing of information within the community of historians, explorers, geologists and archaeologists, to encourage research about the mining industries and provide information to national and local government authorities, as well as land and property owners. This would build on the previous North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty’s Oresome project which the group could continue. You can read more about the proposals at http://northdalemine.uk/2019/04/23/north-pennines-mines-research-group/.

Car parking is available at the east end of the village, adjacent to the Anglican Church, and the bus service 101 runs by Weardale Motor Services from Bishop Auckland railway station. Though hot drinks will be available on the day, you should organise your own lunch. For further details please free to contact me, Pete Jackson, through email or phone 01388 527 532′.

CBA National – a change in address
CBA National have now moved location in York. Rather than being at Bootham, to the north of the minister and beyond the city walls, they are now located on the other side of the river and within the walls. Their address for postal correspondence is now;

CBA National
92 Micklegate
York
YO1 6JX

Other details for email, website and phone details, however, remain unchanged.

CBA National’s Book Sale (continued)

The CBA National book sale as reported in our last issue is, according to the grapevine, now continuing to the end of July. There remain a number of North-land relevant publications which can be bought for a fraction of their original prices. If you haven’t yet had a look, the online shop can be visited here.

Our CBA North alphabet of archaeology continues: K to M

CBA North News
Our alphabet of archaeology is back covering letters K to M – with a series of M’s we have to hand. Again we cover as much of the CBA North region we can for news of interest to all Members and Followers. We start with the killing of a bull – Taurean readers “may wish to look away now” as the news sports reports start, have a quick announcement on the Lake District in case anyone missed it and also notice a further Festival of Archaeology event that covers the Mesolithic to the Medieval.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 18.07.2017

Mithras: Roman Religion from the Thames to Tyne
At the Great North Museum: Hancock, Newcastle, Members will recall we had our AGM this year – indeed seeing specially loaned exhibits associated with the Roman cavalry Turma project. Members interested in the Roman period now have another reason to visit the museum to see further specially loaned exhibits associated with the sun god Mithras, appropriate as we are now finally into the summer perhaps. Jonathan Loach of Tyne and Wear Museums has kindly provided us with both the press release and pictures detailing this exhibition.

“This exhibition runs from Saturday 1 July to Sunday 27 August. It brings together for the first time objects found in the 1950s during excavations of two important temples to the god Mithras, at Carrawburgh on Hadrian’s Wall and Walbrook in London.


The three main altars from the Carrawburgh Mithraeum © Tyne and Wear Museums

The Carrawburgh finds – owned by the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne and on show in the Great North Museum: Hancock – include three altars to Mithras as well as sculptures and religious utensils. They are joined by three exquisite marble heads of Mithras, Minerva and Serapis found at Walbrook [see at the base of today’s articles],…


Profile of a Roman marble head of Mithras © Museum of London

…and a sketch reconstruction of the interior of Carrawburgh temple by artist Alan Sorrell.

Reconstruction by Alan Sorrell of the interior of the Temple to Mithras © Museum of London

Caroline McDonald, Manager at the Great North Museum: Hancock, said:
“This is a once in a lifetime chance for anyone interested in archaeology to see these two internationally important Roman Mithras collections side by side. It’s never happened before and is not to be missed.
“I’m thrilled that we’ve been able to work with the Museum of London, my home for many years, on making this display a reality.”

Mithras was an ancient Persian god adopted in the Roman Empire as the main deity of a mystery religion that flourished in the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD. The religion was open only to men and some scholars believe its worshippers were highly secretive about their rituals and beliefs.

Mithras was both a sun god and a creator god. Iconography found in his temples often focuses on the act of creation in which Mithras kills a bull and life – in the form of ears of wheat – emerges from the slain animal’s tail. The god is frequently depicted as being born of a rock or egg, and the Great North Museum: Hancock holds a unique carving found at Housesteads Roman Fort showing the birth of Mithras from the cosmic egg.


The unique stone from Housesteads described above © Tyne and Wear Museums

Andrew Parkin, Keeper of Archaeology at the Great North Museum: Hancock, said:
“This exhibition provides us with the unique opportunity to tell the story of the worship of Mithras in Roman Britain from two different perspectives. As a god worshipped both in the provincial capital of London and on the northern frontier of Hadrian’s Wall.”

The excavations of the Mithraic temples at Carrawburgh and Walbrook in the 1950s captured the public imagination and stimulated interest in Mithras and the cult-like religion bearing his name.

The London temple was discovered during building work in 1954 and revealed the fine marble sculptures of Mithras, Minerva and Serapis. Around 400,000 visitors came to see the temple in just a fortnight and a campaign to save it was started. Even then Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill was involved in discussions about its preservation. The eventual outcome saw the temple moved to a nearby location where the public could see it.

Roy Stephenson, Head of Archaeological Collections at the Museum of London, said:
“We are delighted to be able to share these incredible sculptures with the people of the north-east of England, more especially as the collection at the Great North Museum: Hancock made such a formative impression on me as a child. I encourage everyone to go and see these important artefacts together while they can.”


The marble head of Serapis as found carefully buried under one of the floor levels of the Walbrook Mithraeum © Museum of London

By the 4th century AD, Roman Mithraism was in decline as Christianity spread across the Empire. The discovery of the heads of Mithras and Serapis at Walbrook – carefully hidden, buried underneath the temple flooring – may attest to the fact that the temple switched its worship to the god Bacchus”.

A pair of events will take place on this Friday, 21 July, at the museum in connection with this exhibition. At 12.30 there will be a gallery talk Why do Museums create imitation Mithraea? and at 17.30 there will be a public talk Staging religious experience in the Mithraeum: Mystagogues and Meanings both by Professor Richard Gordon of Erfurt University. Further details can be found here.

Additionally there is also another gallery tour on Friday, 28 July, as part of this exhibition whose details can be found here.

The Lake District as a World Heritage Site
Members and Followers will have doubtless heard or seen the news that the Lake District National Park is Britain’s newest (and 31st) World Heritage Site. Details on this can be found on the pages of the National Park here.

This now means that there are four World Heritage Sites within the CBA North region. Uniquely, at the moment, this also means that Ravenglass Roman fort and bath house are located in two World Heritage Sites. There are also four National Parks and four Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty as well – there is much happening in all of these areas. We hope to report upon something from these soon.

The Mesolithic to Medieval at Cresswell: another Festival of Archaeology Event
Members and Followers will recall that we publicised something on the fieldwork around the village and tower at Cresswell, Northumberland, earlier in the year.


Excavations underway at Cresswell Tower earlier in the year

Next week sees a talk, as another within the Festival of Archaeology, which will summarise the findings – thus far – of the project. In a surfeit of M’s for our alphabet will be present with finds from the Mesolithic to the Medieval recorded, by a further M. Barry Mead will describe all in his talk on Wednesday, 26 July, at Cresswell village hall. Details for this event are on the Festival of Archaeology pages here.