Tag Archives: Durham University

Teesside Archaeological Society lecture – this Tuesday

Good Morning Everyone,

This is just a quick email to say thank you to everyone who has already registered with Teesside Archaeological Society for this year. We very much appreciate it and thank you for everyone who attended the last lecture. We had 51 people come along!

The next lecture will take place on the 19th April. It is NOT the last Tuesday of the month this time, due to the library being used for other purposes.

‘Nevern Castle in Pembrokeshire’ by Dr. Chris Caple
Dr. Chris Caple graduated from the University of Wales, College of Cardiff, with a BSc in Archaeological Conservation. In addition to being a Fellow of Antiquaries, and Director of the postgraduate programme in artefact conservation in Durham University Department of Archaeology, he has a long-term research interest in Welsh castles. This talk will concentrate on the Welsh castle he has been most recently involved with in excavating: Nevern Castle in Pembrokeshire, where excavations began in 2008 and will continue to 2018. Findings so far of this well-preserved 12th Century castle, built of stone mortared with clay, include a threshold containing hidden apotropaic symbols.

Best wishes,
Dave

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A quick reminder – Dead Men DO Tell Tales

A quick reminder in case anyone has forgotten. Tonight is the Teesside Archaeological Society’s lecture Dead Men DO Tell Tales by Dr. Andrew Millard, who as well as President of the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland, is also a Senior Lecturer at Durham University in his day job.

Further details of the talk and the speaker, hosting society and venue can be found in the Teesside Archaeological Society’s website page here. Details of the further TAS events for 2016 can be found in our CBA North Events page and further information on TAS in our Local Societies and Groups page.

Enjoy!

Were the Trypillia mega-sites the first cities in Europe?

A quick reminder of that one of the regular local society events to come in the next week is the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland’s lecture by Professor John Chapman and Dr. Bisserka Gaydarska on Saturday afternoon with a poster of the details attached here.

An abstract for the lecture notes:

“It is now recognised that Trypillia mega-sites of the Ukraine and Moldova were the largest settlements in 4th millennium BC Europe – the largest as big as the first Near Eastern cities. The first 40 years of investigation of the Trypillia mega-sites (1971 – 2011) gave an understanding of broad planning principles but also provided exaggerated site sizes, little detail on intra-site grouping and no indication of intra-site phasing. After five years of intensive, inter-disciplinary, international projects, the key questions for current mega-site studies now focus round the problematic relationship between the huge size of the mega-sites and the complete absence so far of any materialisation of social differentiation. Could it be that long-term, all-year-round, permanent occupation by a huge urban population is the wrong model for mega-sites?”

This lecture will answer will answer the title of this email, as well answer the question above from using a range of evidence  to provide fresh answers on the site.

Details for the ‘Arch & Arch’ can be found at our Local Societies and Groups page, as well as their 2016 programme in our events here.

As ever please let us know of any further events – you might know about something, but someone else perhaps interested in it might not!

AKE/27.02.2016

Durham World Heritage Site Research Strategy Launch Event

The Durham World Heritage Site Research Framework was published January last year.  It aims to promote rigorous, academically informed research to progress our understanding and appreciation of the Cathedral, Castle and their environs.

To view the Strategy click here.

This launch event will provide an opportunity for interested researchers to discuss the priorities for research identified in the Strategy and aims to provide a space for the initial discussions which will lead to future research projects and funding proposals for them.

Please click here to see the programme for a full schedule of the planned activity for the afternoon.

This event will be on Wednesday 24 February 2016 at 1.00pm in the Learning Centre, Palace Green Library, Durham.

If you would like to attend please register your details with Kelly Guy at: admin.imems@durham.ac.uk.

Two UNESCO lectures next week

Next week series a pair of UNESCO lectures are to be held. However both on the same day at the same time but in Durham and Newcastle. Details of both lectures are given below.

Professor Peter Stone, UNESCO Chair in Cultural Property Protection and Peace at Newcastle University

This lecture, Cultural Property in Conflict and Peace, is part of the Newcastle University Insights lecture series. Admission is free with no pre-booking required.

This starts at 17:30 and will be just over an hour. It will be held at the Curtis Auditorium, Herschel Building, Newcastle University. Further details of this lecture can be found here,

Meanwhile;

Professor Robin Coningham, UNESCO Chair in Archaeological Ethics and Practice in Cultural Heritage at Durham University

The lecture, ‘Ships of Gold’: UNESCO, Pilgrimage and Preservation in South Asia, is part of the Durham World Heritage Site lecture series. Admission is free but booking is required for this.

This also starts at 17:30. It will be held at the Palace Green Library Learning Centre. Further details of this lecture can be found here.

Natural History Society of Northumbria lecture: Quaternary Fluvial Archives: a new paradigm

On Friday 29 January, 7pm-8pm, at the Great North Museum: Hancock in Newcastle, Professor Dave Bridgeland will lecture on work over the past few decades which has pulled together geological and geomorphological records from rivers in the Quaternary Period that show interesting patterns of similarity and difference, which can be related to climate, its zonation and fluctuation, and to crustal provinces. Quaternary ice ages have influenced our landscape far beyond the immediate reach of the ice sheets themselves.

David Bridgland is a Professor in the Department of Geography at Durham University, with research interests in Quaternary environmental change and fluvial history, with reference to palaeontology and archaeology. Until recently he was President of the Geologist’s Association.

The lectures of the Natural History Society of Northumbria are usually held every Friday evening, starting at 7pm, in the learning suite on the ground floor of the Great North Museum: Hancock. The museum is closed to the public at this time, so entry is via both side entrances.

Entry is from 6.20pm and tea, coffee and biscuits are available and the opportunity to socialise. Speakers give an illustrated presentation for 45mins-1 hour and then open the floor for questions and discussions.

Non-members are very welcome to attend but we ask that they kindly make a donation on the night to support these lectures. Further details of the lecture programme can be found at http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/activities-ttea.php.

Early Medieval Europe Debates

Early Medieval Europe Debates is a new interdisciplinary initiative by the Departments of Archaeology and History at Durham University. All are welcome to attend EMED events. Seminars take place in the Department of Archaeology on the Science Site at 17.15 pm in room D210 (not D217) in the Dawson Building. Forthcoming seminars include:

Judith Jesch, University of Nottingham
Vikings beyond boundaries: migration and diaspora in the Viking Age and after
Thursday, 21st January

Orla Murphy, University College Cork
Early Medieval Textual Transmissions: Visual Media and the Movement of Ideas
Thursday, 18th February

Chris Scull, University College London/ University of Cardiff
Recent discoveries at Rendlesham: the archaeology and contexts of a 7th-century East Anglian royal settlement
Thursday, 10th March

E M E D is a new joint initiative by Helen Foxhall Forbes (History) and Sarah Semple (Archaeology). For further information contact the Seminar Assistant Tristan Lake (Tristan.Lake@Durham.ac.uk).

Seminars will take place in the Department of Archaeology on the Science Site in room D210 (not D217) and will be followed by drinks and usually by dinner with the speaker. If you wish to come for dinner please contact Tristan on the Tuesday before the seminar at the latest.

[Please see the attached EMED, 21.01.2016 poster for the details of previous seminars in this series].