Tag Archives: Durham University

Forthcoming lectures tonight and this week across CBA North

CBA North News
This week sees a number of events across the CBA North region. There are events in Berwick (this evening), Newcastle and Appleby (Wednesday and Thursday evenings respectively) on a range of project and sites inside and outside of our area, from groups inside and outside of our network. There is plenty to take your choice from, and more again to come soon as news to you. If you would like to submit anything of your local groups recent activities or plans for the summer please let us know.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
09.04.2018

Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the stories of the Scottish soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650
Richard Annis, Senior Archaeologist at Archaeological Services Durham University, writes to us giving us a foretaste of his Berwick lecture to the Border Archaeological Society [BAS in our events listing] tonight and whose results will appear in a forthcoming book and exhibition on these soldiers.

Janet at work; a photo by North News for Durham University

Richard writes;
“In November 2013, human bones were found during building work at Durham’s Palace Green. The excavation that followed found the skeletons of 28 young men in two mass graves. A long and painstaking archaeological project showed that they were some of over 1600 Scottish prisoners who lost their lives at Durham after the Battle of Dunbar in 1650.

“A new book, to be published this June, tells their story; their lives before the battle, how they came to Durham, how they died, and how they came to have disappeared from view for over 360 years. These were ordinary people, caught up in extraordinary events. As a result of the project, we know more about them than any comparable group from 17th-century Scotland. The story also looks at some of their fellow prisoners; men who survived their captivity and regained their freedom. Some went on to new lives, unimaginable to them before the battle that changed everything, in new landscapes on the edge of the known world.

“The exhibition Bodies of Evidence: How Science Unearthed Durham’s Dark Secret will be told in a major exhibition at Palace Green Library. This will run from 9th June to 7th October 2018, and covers the history, the archaeology and the science that underpinned the project”.

For further information on this multifaceted project, Members and Followers can read more on the Scottish Soldiers blog and see recent facial reconstruction work, putting the practices as also described in a previous BAS talk, a Youtube video.

Wednesday and Thursday’s lectures
On Wednesday, the 11th, our group member the Northumberland Archaeological Group will hear an update on The Peregrini Project: Excavations on Lindisfarne from Richard Carlton of The Archaeological Practice in their monthly Newcastle meeting.

On Thursday, the 12th, in Appleby our group the Appleby Archaeology Group will also hear of The Late Iron Age royal site at Stanwick, North Yorkshire: new perspectives by Professor Colin Haselgrove of Leicester University. At both meetings visitors are most welcome to attend. Details as to the venues and times of all these meetings can be found online through our Local Societies and Groups page of our website here.

Archaeology and the small finds of North-East England

A quick reminder that there is still time to book a place at this conference covered in our last email to you. If you would like to attend please follow this link or see  http://www.aasdn.org.uk/NEarch18.htm for further details.

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CBA North’s joint April Conference: Archaeology and the small finds of North-East England

CBA North News
We are delighted to announce the first of the ‘big’ conferences in CBA North region to you as Archaeology and the small finds of North-East England. This is one that we are jointly supporting with the Finds Research Group, our group member the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland as well as Durham University.

Below are details of the programme which covers all periods between the Anglo-Saxon and the 19th century, across much of our region from Coquetdale to Teesside (and just over into Yarm) where specifically named and more besides, this conference promises to be a most interesting and fully packed day. Details on how to book a discounted place as a CBA North member are given below, clicking on the posters will take you to the online booking page.

In case you would like to forward this information onto others, please use the links in the left-hand portion of this email or you can send on the link http://www.aasdn.org.uk/NEarch18.htm.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
03.04.2018

Archaeology and the small finds of North-East England

Various CBA North Committee members will be there, with various discounted books for sale from £2 to £20 on various topics as well, so feel free to have a word with us or at any other time.

Further details on our co-partners for this conference can be found through the various links below;

The Finds Research Group promotes  the study of artefacts from archaeological sites dating from the post-Roman period onwards. It is well-known, even outside finds circles, for producing many datasheets summarising particular classes of objects – some of which can now be downloaded from their website.

– Durham University, and indeed its archaeology department, is no stranger to appearing in CBA North’s materials over many years. Current information on the department can be found online here.

– our group member the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland will be already familiar to you as we’ve announced their various lectures in the past. As a follow-on from the conference on the following day their regular meeting is also given over to a finds-based theme; Dr Eleanor Standley will be giving the lecture Spinning yarns and skinning rabbits in the later Medieval period: new contributions to the archaeology of religion, sexuality and daily life.

CBA National’s Community Archaeology Survey
Readers will recall our last email carried the news of, and link to, a survey of community archaeology. The deadline for this survey has now been extended to Sunday 8 April 2018. Here is the link again in case you have yet to fill in the survey, or can send it to someone else,  https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/CBA_Community_archaeology_2018. Please fill in this survey if you have the time!

Wear-based archaeology next week

CBA North News
Today quick news of two events which may be of particular interest to those in the Sunderland and County Durham area.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
20.10.2017

North Hylton Community Archaeology Dig
This is an opportunity for both adults and children to take part in fieldwalking, trial trenching (small test pits for children) and finds washing. No experience is necessary, training will be provided by professional archaeologists from Wardell Armstrong and all equipment will be provided.

The purpose of the work is to investigate the cropmark visible above on aerial photographs. This project is funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

The archaeological work will run from Monday 23rd October until 3rd November. Volunteers can attend for as few or as many days as they wish, but they do need to book a place. If you are interested please contact;

Frank Giecco     fgiecco@wardell-armstrong.com

Norman Kirtlan     sunderlandsforgottenstones@gmail.com

Further information on the project can be found at Sunderland’s Forgotten Stones website here.

The Durham River Wear Assemblage Project
Also next week is a lecture on finds from the Durham River Wear Assemblage Project.

Further information on the project can be found on here in the pages of the Department of Archaeology, Durham University.

T’s and U’s for the archaeological alphabet

CBA North News
Our alphabet of archaeology continues with a quick pair of Updates from TillVAS and CITiZAN with news; there are also events listed for this weekend… but we aren’t going to cheat and claim the W just yet!

Our Events page on the website will continue to grow and further events that have come to us from one of our group members to us will be added soon to the page. We’ll gather these up for 2018 (please send us notice of any that you think might of interest to everyone else) and send on all the events that we know of at the start of the year for what is, traditionally, the most widely read and circulated of all our emails.

We hope to send out more news later this week with October’s many events listed.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
26.09.2017

Local group round-up: TillVAS in north Northumberland
Maureen Charlton and Heather Pentland send us another group round-up from the Till Valley Archaeological Society. Excavations have only recently finished at this site, so this – outside of the local parish magazine – is the first news of this excavation outside the area.

They also note the next TillVAS event – to which all are invited – is not long away either.

Events this weekend
This weekend is full of archaeological events – we know of at least six. Here are posters for three.

…and finally, though you’ll have to be quick to book a place for this dayschool.

CITiZAN in CBA North-land during 2017
Megan Clement of the Coastal and Intertidal Zone Archaeological Network (CITiZAN) has sent us a brief note of their work this summer as we covered last year. This year the project’s efforts have concentrated, so far, upon Cumbria. She writes;

“Two events were hosted in Cumbria during the Festival of British Archaeology on the 16th and 17th July, led by CITiZAN North in partnership with Morecambe Bay Partnership. These were CITiZAN app workshops which involved a basic guided walk around a local area whilst updating and adding new records to the CITiZAN dataset. The two sites chosen were Roa Island near Barrow-in-Furness and Bardsea near Ulverston. Several new sites were recording including Rampside Navigation Light, a number of shipwrecks at Roa and anti-tank and anti-glider defences were recorded at Bardsea. In all 10 people attended across the two events and were trained in recording the app and identifying archaeology on the coast and in the intertidal zone.

If you are interested in reading more about the workshop at Roa Island, there is a blog which can be found here. We will be returning to Roa Island in November 2017 as some significant new features were identified and need to have a more in-depth survey carried out.”


A volunteer recording a shipwreck at Roa Island causeway (© CITiZAN)

Megan also writes that there are further training events to come if you are interested;

“There is one in Tyneside and one in Cumbria coming up in October. These are:

1. App Workshop and Guided Walk: North Shields
Friday 6th October at 2.00pm – 4.30pm
Venue Old Low Light Heritage Centre

Come join CITiZAN at the Old Low Light Heritage Centre, in North Shields (Fish Quay NE30 1JA) for an app workshop in how to rapidly record at risk archaeology on the coast. Join us for a short talk and tutorial on the app, a leisurely walk down the north bank of the Tyne recording archaeology. The event is free but places have to be booked here.

2. Training event: Roa Island
Friday 13th and Saturday 14th October 10.00am-4.00pm
Venue to be confirmed but near Roa Island

Join CITiZAN North and Morecambe Bay Partnership at Roa Island, near Barrow-in-Furness to make a permanent archaeological record the remains of a jetty and slipway identified during a workshop in July. These features appear to be part of the former slipway to access Piel Island and part of Piel pier used for travel to Belfast and Douglas. The event is free but places have to be booked for this also.”

Medieval and Renaissance Durham

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Medieval and Renaissance Durham Community Course:
Drama, Ritual, Storytelling and People
Wednesday, 4 May 2016 to Wednesday, 29 June 2016

The full course is offered at a charge of £41.00 per person, please click here to register.
Please note registration for the course will close on Thursday 28th April 2016.

If you’re interested in the history of the people and stories of Medieval and Renaissance Durham, consider joining us for an exciting new series, proudly offered by Durham University’s Medieval and Early Modern Student Association.

This year’s ‘Community Course’ (led by our team of specialist Durham-based researchers) will be made up of eight sessions covering an interesting range of topics, broadly following the themes of performance, ritual, storytelling of the people of the North East.

This is a course for anyone who wants to learn a little more about our region, whether you’re a complete beginner, or already know a fair amount about the North East during this interesting period. Our sessions will be relaxed and informal with plenty of tea and coffee, so sign up and come along!

The course consists of eight weekly sessions as follows (full details are available here):

• Wednesday 4 May 2016, 6.30pm – 8.30pm
• Wednesday 11 May 2016, 7:00pm – 9:00pm
• Wednesday 18 May 2016, 7:00pm – 9:00pm
• Wednesday 25 May 2016, 7:00pm – 9:00pm
• Wednesday 8 June 2016, 6.30pm – 8.30pm
• Wednesday 15 June 2016, 7:00pm – 9:00pm
• Wednesday 22 June 2016, 7:00pm – 9:00pm
• Wednesday 29 June 2016, 7:00pm – 9:00pm

For further details please see the attached poster or contact: durhamcommunitycourse2016@gmail.com.

Arch & Arch lecture this week as well

Details of the date, time and venue next Arch & Arch’s lectures can be found can be found in the poster that can be seen in the attached poster.

Some details of the talk and the speaker can be found below;

Intensive historical lead mining, especially during the 18th to early 20th centuries, transformed the landscapes of the North Pennines and resulted in a widespread legacy of nationally important archaeological remains. Although the significance of this industrial heritage is widely acknowledged, the rates at which abandoned mines in dynamic upland environments are being eroded and their cultural significance lost remains poorly understood. This talk focuses on the changing condition of Whitesike and Bentyfield lead mines in the South Tyne catchment, Cumbria, over several different historical and recent timescales.

A range of cutting-edge analysis techniques were used to monitor ongoing changes to the surface archaeological remains, including airborne remote sensing, UAV survey and terrestrial laser scanning. The results have important implications for future archaeological research and heritage management, as well as highlighting the wider significance of abandoned mines as sources of heavy metal contaminants to local rivers.

Mark Kincey is a teaching fellow and research associate within the Department of Geography at Durham University. He is currently completing a PhD focusing on the interactions between historical lead mining and landscape change in the North Pennines, jointly supervised by the geography and archaeology departments at Durham. Prior to this he worked for over a decade as an archaeologist, specialising in landscape archaeology, remote sensing and field survey.

Teesside Archaeological Society lecture – this Tuesday

Good Morning Everyone,

This is just a quick email to say thank you to everyone who has already registered with Teesside Archaeological Society for this year. We very much appreciate it and thank you for everyone who attended the last lecture. We had 51 people come along!

The next lecture will take place on the 19th April. It is NOT the last Tuesday of the month this time, due to the library being used for other purposes.

‘Nevern Castle in Pembrokeshire’ by Dr. Chris Caple
Dr. Chris Caple graduated from the University of Wales, College of Cardiff, with a BSc in Archaeological Conservation. In addition to being a Fellow of Antiquaries, and Director of the postgraduate programme in artefact conservation in Durham University Department of Archaeology, he has a long-term research interest in Welsh castles. This talk will concentrate on the Welsh castle he has been most recently involved with in excavating: Nevern Castle in Pembrokeshire, where excavations began in 2008 and will continue to 2018. Findings so far of this well-preserved 12th Century castle, built of stone mortared with clay, include a threshold containing hidden apotropaic symbols.

Best wishes,
Dave