Tag Archives: Durham University

Medieval and Renaissance Durham

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Medieval and Renaissance Durham Community Course:
Drama, Ritual, Storytelling and People
Wednesday, 4 May 2016 to Wednesday, 29 June 2016

The full course is offered at a charge of £41.00 per person, please click here to register.
Please note registration for the course will close on Thursday 28th April 2016.

If you’re interested in the history of the people and stories of Medieval and Renaissance Durham, consider joining us for an exciting new series, proudly offered by Durham University’s Medieval and Early Modern Student Association.

This year’s ‘Community Course’ (led by our team of specialist Durham-based researchers) will be made up of eight sessions covering an interesting range of topics, broadly following the themes of performance, ritual, storytelling of the people of the North East.

This is a course for anyone who wants to learn a little more about our region, whether you’re a complete beginner, or already know a fair amount about the North East during this interesting period. Our sessions will be relaxed and informal with plenty of tea and coffee, so sign up and come along!

The course consists of eight weekly sessions as follows (full details are available here):

• Wednesday 4 May 2016, 6.30pm – 8.30pm
• Wednesday 11 May 2016, 7:00pm – 9:00pm
• Wednesday 18 May 2016, 7:00pm – 9:00pm
• Wednesday 25 May 2016, 7:00pm – 9:00pm
• Wednesday 8 June 2016, 6.30pm – 8.30pm
• Wednesday 15 June 2016, 7:00pm – 9:00pm
• Wednesday 22 June 2016, 7:00pm – 9:00pm
• Wednesday 29 June 2016, 7:00pm – 9:00pm

For further details please see the attached poster or contact: durhamcommunitycourse2016@gmail.com.

Arch & Arch lecture this week as well

Details of the date, time and venue next Arch & Arch’s lectures can be found can be found in the poster that can be seen in the attached poster.

Some details of the talk and the speaker can be found below;

Intensive historical lead mining, especially during the 18th to early 20th centuries, transformed the landscapes of the North Pennines and resulted in a widespread legacy of nationally important archaeological remains. Although the significance of this industrial heritage is widely acknowledged, the rates at which abandoned mines in dynamic upland environments are being eroded and their cultural significance lost remains poorly understood. This talk focuses on the changing condition of Whitesike and Bentyfield lead mines in the South Tyne catchment, Cumbria, over several different historical and recent timescales.

A range of cutting-edge analysis techniques were used to monitor ongoing changes to the surface archaeological remains, including airborne remote sensing, UAV survey and terrestrial laser scanning. The results have important implications for future archaeological research and heritage management, as well as highlighting the wider significance of abandoned mines as sources of heavy metal contaminants to local rivers.

Mark Kincey is a teaching fellow and research associate within the Department of Geography at Durham University. He is currently completing a PhD focusing on the interactions between historical lead mining and landscape change in the North Pennines, jointly supervised by the geography and archaeology departments at Durham. Prior to this he worked for over a decade as an archaeologist, specialising in landscape archaeology, remote sensing and field survey.

Teesside Archaeological Society lecture – this Tuesday

Good Morning Everyone,

This is just a quick email to say thank you to everyone who has already registered with Teesside Archaeological Society for this year. We very much appreciate it and thank you for everyone who attended the last lecture. We had 51 people come along!

The next lecture will take place on the 19th April. It is NOT the last Tuesday of the month this time, due to the library being used for other purposes.

‘Nevern Castle in Pembrokeshire’ by Dr. Chris Caple
Dr. Chris Caple graduated from the University of Wales, College of Cardiff, with a BSc in Archaeological Conservation. In addition to being a Fellow of Antiquaries, and Director of the postgraduate programme in artefact conservation in Durham University Department of Archaeology, he has a long-term research interest in Welsh castles. This talk will concentrate on the Welsh castle he has been most recently involved with in excavating: Nevern Castle in Pembrokeshire, where excavations began in 2008 and will continue to 2018. Findings so far of this well-preserved 12th Century castle, built of stone mortared with clay, include a threshold containing hidden apotropaic symbols.

Best wishes,
Dave

A quick reminder – Dead Men DO Tell Tales

A quick reminder in case anyone has forgotten. Tonight is the Teesside Archaeological Society’s lecture Dead Men DO Tell Tales by Dr. Andrew Millard, who as well as President of the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland, is also a Senior Lecturer at Durham University in his day job.

Further details of the talk and the speaker, hosting society and venue can be found in the Teesside Archaeological Society’s website page here. Details of the further TAS events for 2016 can be found in our CBA North Events page and further information on TAS in our Local Societies and Groups page.

Enjoy!

Were the Trypillia mega-sites the first cities in Europe?

A quick reminder of that one of the regular local society events to come in the next week is the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland’s lecture by Professor John Chapman and Dr. Bisserka Gaydarska on Saturday afternoon with a poster of the details attached here.

An abstract for the lecture notes:

“It is now recognised that Trypillia mega-sites of the Ukraine and Moldova were the largest settlements in 4th millennium BC Europe – the largest as big as the first Near Eastern cities. The first 40 years of investigation of the Trypillia mega-sites (1971 – 2011) gave an understanding of broad planning principles but also provided exaggerated site sizes, little detail on intra-site grouping and no indication of intra-site phasing. After five years of intensive, inter-disciplinary, international projects, the key questions for current mega-site studies now focus round the problematic relationship between the huge size of the mega-sites and the complete absence so far of any materialisation of social differentiation. Could it be that long-term, all-year-round, permanent occupation by a huge urban population is the wrong model for mega-sites?”

This lecture will answer will answer the title of this email, as well answer the question above from using a range of evidence  to provide fresh answers on the site.

Details for the ‘Arch & Arch’ can be found at our Local Societies and Groups page, as well as their 2016 programme in our events here.

As ever please let us know of any further events – you might know about something, but someone else perhaps interested in it might not!

AKE/27.02.2016

Durham World Heritage Site Research Strategy Launch Event

The Durham World Heritage Site Research Framework was published January last year.  It aims to promote rigorous, academically informed research to progress our understanding and appreciation of the Cathedral, Castle and their environs.

To view the Strategy click here.

This launch event will provide an opportunity for interested researchers to discuss the priorities for research identified in the Strategy and aims to provide a space for the initial discussions which will lead to future research projects and funding proposals for them.

Please click here to see the programme for a full schedule of the planned activity for the afternoon.

This event will be on Wednesday 24 February 2016 at 1.00pm in the Learning Centre, Palace Green Library, Durham.

If you would like to attend please register your details with Kelly Guy at: admin.imems@durham.ac.uk.

Two UNESCO lectures next week

Next week series a pair of UNESCO lectures are to be held. However both on the same day at the same time but in Durham and Newcastle. Details of both lectures are given below.

Professor Peter Stone, UNESCO Chair in Cultural Property Protection and Peace at Newcastle University

This lecture, Cultural Property in Conflict and Peace, is part of the Newcastle University Insights lecture series. Admission is free with no pre-booking required.

This starts at 17:30 and will be just over an hour. It will be held at the Curtis Auditorium, Herschel Building, Newcastle University. Further details of this lecture can be found here,

Meanwhile;

Professor Robin Coningham, UNESCO Chair in Archaeological Ethics and Practice in Cultural Heritage at Durham University

The lecture, ‘Ships of Gold’: UNESCO, Pilgrimage and Preservation in South Asia, is part of the Durham World Heritage Site lecture series. Admission is free but booking is required for this.

This also starts at 17:30. It will be held at the Palace Green Library Learning Centre. Further details of this lecture can be found here.