Tag Archives: Cumbria

Putting flesh on the bare bones of history

CBA North News

Another month has all too quickly passed by, but all that means is another month of lectures and events to look forward to as well. This email is something of a bumper issue of notices for forthcoming events – kicking off on the 3rd with others again in the forthcoming weeks. Once again these are spread across the region, and a bit further beyond, dealing with subjects and locations familiar as well as distant in time and space.

As of yesterday’s Committee meeting it was thought that if anyone, or any local groups, would like to report their own news or announce their forthcoming events to a wider audience across the whole of the CBA North region, please send us such information and material (ideally with a picture or two).

We already have notices of other further events in October, as well as two events – outside of the usual society regular events – for November (which we will aim to send out later this month).

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
02.10.2016

Depicting the Dead
Lectures put flesh on the bare bones of history – and this one of BAS does more than most.

Dr Eilidh Ferguson studied Forensic Anthropology at the University of Dundee before a PhD in juvenile facial identification. She is currently working as a postdoctoral research assistant studying adult facial identification from photographic images and is a Royal Anthropological Institute certified forensic anthropologist involved in forensic casework both in the UK and abroad.

The region is very familiar with anatomical and osteoarchaeological research as the illustration from William Greenwell’s British Barrows shows.

Death on the Nile
Death is also the subject of the North East Ancient Egypt Society’s mini-study in Durham next Saturday, 8 October, as well. In this case a series of three speakers will be dealing with coffin types and decoration. See the NEAES website for more details. This is free to members, but for non-members this will be £5.

Bosworth 1485
The full reconstruction of an archaeological battlefield may, however, be a little way off yet. However the rediscovery of one – Bosworth in Leicestershire – itself is the subject of the next Till Valley Archaeological Society lecture next weekend.

IA Rhouses

The work in relocating this battlefield, previously thought known, is very like TillVAS’s own involvement in the Flodden500 project. Details for booking a place at this lecture are given above, but visitors are welcome to any of the other TillVAS regular lectures to December that are already listed in our Events website page.

Resuming regular local society lectures
Hard on the heels of these events the lectures of the Northumberland Archaeological Group (NAG) resume in Newcastle on the 12th October when Rob Young will talk on ‘Excavations at Derwentcote: a Study in Nineteenth Century Workers’ Housing’, whilst the first of the Appleby Archaeology Group when other local fieldwork ‘Mapping the Medieval landscape of Cumbria’ by Dr Caron Newman will be the following day in Appleby.

The further events of these both these groups – in the case of the Appleby Archaeology Group up to April 2017 – can also be found in our Events (‘https://cbanorth.wordpress.com/events/‘) page of the website.

October 2016’s calendar of regular society events
3 October – Depicting the Dead: an insight into craniofacial analysis for forensic identification and archaeological investigation, Dr Eilidh Ferguson [BAS]
8 October – Death on the Nile: Uncovering Lives and the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt [NEAES]
9 October – Bosworth 1485, Dr Glenn Foard [TILLVAS]
13 October – Mapping the Medieval Landscape of Cumbria, Dr Caron Newman [APPLEBY]
16 October – David Dippie Dixon Memorial Lectures: William Boyd and Controversy as well as Neanderthal Hunting and animal avoidance strategies, Professor Mark White [CCA]
19 October – The archaeology of St John Lateran and the transformation of Rome from Septimius Severus to Constantine, Professor Ian Haynes [ARCH & ARCH]
25 October – Children of the Revolution, Dr Becky Gowland [TAS]
26 October – Kirkharle, Rothley and Alnwick: the three Northumberland landscapes of Capability Brown, Nick Owen [SOCANTS]

Details as to times and venues for all these events can be found in our Local Societies and Groups page of the website.

Advertisements

Arch & Arch lecture this week as well

Details of the date, time and venue next Arch & Arch’s lectures can be found can be found in the poster that can be seen in the attached poster.

Some details of the talk and the speaker can be found below;

Intensive historical lead mining, especially during the 18th to early 20th centuries, transformed the landscapes of the North Pennines and resulted in a widespread legacy of nationally important archaeological remains. Although the significance of this industrial heritage is widely acknowledged, the rates at which abandoned mines in dynamic upland environments are being eroded and their cultural significance lost remains poorly understood. This talk focuses on the changing condition of Whitesike and Bentyfield lead mines in the South Tyne catchment, Cumbria, over several different historical and recent timescales.

A range of cutting-edge analysis techniques were used to monitor ongoing changes to the surface archaeological remains, including airborne remote sensing, UAV survey and terrestrial laser scanning. The results have important implications for future archaeological research and heritage management, as well as highlighting the wider significance of abandoned mines as sources of heavy metal contaminants to local rivers.

Mark Kincey is a teaching fellow and research associate within the Department of Geography at Durham University. He is currently completing a PhD focusing on the interactions between historical lead mining and landscape change in the North Pennines, jointly supervised by the geography and archaeology departments at Durham. Prior to this he worked for over a decade as an archaeologist, specialising in landscape archaeology, remote sensing and field survey.

CWAAS Anniversary Celebrations

[Though the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society are not a CBA North member, we’ve been passed details by Professor Stringer of the forthcoming 150th Anniversary of the society, so see – and enjoy the links of – that below].

Dear CBA North Members,

As you may know, the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society is celebrating its 150th Anniversary this year. We have a full programme of events appropriate to such a commemoration, and are naturally keen to ensure the widest possible publicity. The Society would therefore be most grateful if you felt it to be appropriate to post on your website a link to our Anniversary webpage. The URL is http://cumbriapast.com/cgi-bin/ms/main.pl?action=150year.

I should add that, as part of our Anniversary celebrations, the Society has digitised its Transactions, accessible on the Archaeological Data Service website at http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archives/view/cumberland/. This may likewise be of
interest to your members, and I hope that you can also draw it to their attention.

Best wishes

Keith Stringer
Vice-President of the CWAAS and Chair of its Outreach Committee

Morecambe Bay Landscape Partnership events this week

CBA North members might be interested to hear of two events in the south-west of our CBA Region being run by the Morecambe Bay Landscape Partnership.

On Wednesday is the Morecambe Bay Partnership Conference 2016 which is being held at The Platform, Old Station Buildings, Marine Road West, in Morecambe from 10am to 4.30pm. Donations of £12 for individuals and small organisations or £25 for large organisations are suggested to cover costs and include a hot lunch. Please book your ticket(s) online by following the link.

The programme of this day includes;

  • Putting Morecambe Bay on the Map, Susannah Bleakley, Morecambe Bay Partnership
  • Septic tanks, sewage and sexy vegetables – selling sustainability – Chris Dessent, Creative Concern
  • Morecambe Bay’s fishermen’s stories – Jenn Mattinson, Morecambe Bay Partnership
  • Walduck’s Wall  – Simon Williams, Morecambe Bay Partnership
  • Morecambe Bay Birds – Chris Lumb, Natural England
  • Gleaston Castle, New Insights in 3D – Dan Elsworth,  Greenlane Archaeology & Adam Stanford,  Aerial-Cam
  • North West Coast Connections – Robert Powell, National Grid
  • AGM

We want to welcome as many people as possible, so if £12 is simply too expensive for you, please ask us for one of the limited number of concessionary places.

Alternatively, you can book at ticket, via the link above and send the partnership a cheque – payable to ‘Morecambe Bay Partnership’ and send to The Factory, Castle Mills, Aynam Road, Kendal LA9 7DE.

Meanwhile on the next two weekends are Understanding the Bay: Documentary Research Training for Volunteers days at the Victoria Hall, Grange-over-Sands, from 10am to 4pm where the partnership is looking for volunteers to help research some of the Bay’s most intriguing archaeological sites. If you’re keen to help out, please sign up for these training courses, which will give you the basic skills that you need to help on our project.

It does not cost to be involved in these days, but spaces are limited, so please book you space on this series of workshops here. This work will be to help investigate and collect historical and archaeological information about sites around Morecambe Bay focusing on Hampsfell Hospice (Grange), Kirkhead Tower (Kents Bank) and the maritime heritage of the Cartmel Peninsula.

We are looking for volunteers to help investigate the historical background to these sites. We’ll provide you with the skills required to access archaeological/historical records and documentary evidence during these two training days in March. A volunteer profile has been written for you to find out more about what you are signing up for.

Once you’re fully trained, we hope that you will carry on and help us to research the sites, with support from our training team. This will include further research and drop in sessions during Spring/Summer 2016.

Please note that the session on Saturday 12th March includes an afternoon site visit. Access to the Council Chamber, Victoria Hall is on the first floor and is accessed by a flight of steps. Should this cause a problem for potential volunteers please contact us.