Tag Archives: conference

CBA North: March News

CBA North News

Dear Members and Friends of CBA North,

This issue’s theme seems to be numbers as you will see for various reasons.

The first two months of the year, even with an extra day last month to play, enjoy and work with, have now gone. There are a number of additions to our previous events listings from three of our group members the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland – the ‘Arch & Arch’, Coquetdale Community Archaeology and the Teesside Archaeological Society. (Other group’s events from outside the CBA North network have also been included). All are now in the revised Events page of our website if they are regular happenings.

March’s events start soon – and hopefully third time lucky for the appearance of Tony Wilmott at the BAS meeting this evening – with Whitby Abbey: 30 years of new research. This event was listed at the start of the year, as it has been previously but those of you in the north of the region will know why the hope as well!

However a pair of articles also review meetings previously announced in the CBA North emails to you last year. This come from Elsa Price, of Tullie House Museum in Carlisle, and Kate Sharpe whose conference we gave a grant to support last year and Maureen Norrie, the Editor of the Teesside Archaeological Society (TAS), who describes the Elgee Memorial Lecture at Middlesbrough. Kira-May Charley who many of you will know already for TAS now become Deputy Chair of the group and represents the group at CBA North Committee as part of the local-regional network also being involved in making this happen.

As part of regional-national network, CBA North is one of a number of CBA regional groups. Indeed we were originally numbered (rather than named) regions across the country. Some of you may remember us as CBA Group 3. Claire Corkill and James Rose, both of CBA National, have written to update of what coming out the 2018 survey and workshops held during March 2019 as well as the preliminary findings from the survey we carried in our last issue – wherein plenty number-crunching has been carried out.

The annual Durham Archaeology Day is close at hand, and details of that day are below. As last year CBA North will have a stall there with Committee members present, so please come along, say “Hello!” and give us your views and feedback on how we are doing for you. (We might even have some bargain books for you for sale there).

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
01.03.2020

2020 Local Society and Group Events – further additions
Some 11 further events have been added since our last email to you in our list of local society and group events, which in turn added to the start of the year listing. These come from a number of sources, including groups inside and outside of the CBA North network.

There are now something like 90 events for 2020 listed. Please continue to let us know any additions and/or alterations for the Events as well as any changes in the details for the Local societies and groups page.

Whilst not all the titles and speakers have been confirmed in these new additions, some have dates that have been confirmed, so put them into your diary now. Here is another consolidated block of those ‘new’ dates, organised by date, which you can also print and ‘patch’ over your earlier printouts.

2 March – Prehistoric Sites nearby Duddo Stones and Roughting Linn, Allan Colman [Bowsden Heritage Group]
14 March – CAREing for rock art in the UK and Ireland, Myra Gisen [ARCH & ARCH]
8 April – AGM and Recent developments in Iron Age archaeology in the North-East, Richard Carlton [TILLVAS]
18 July – Festival of Archaeology lecture: St Godric and Finchale Priory, Margaret Coombes [ARCH & ARCH]
17 September – title to be confirmed on the north east lead industry, Greg Finch [CCA]
26 September – title to be confirmed, Paul Brown [ARCH & ARCH]
29 September – Deceptively Spacious: Durham Castle and the walls survey, Richard Annis [TAS]
10 October – Heritage is more precious than oil: teaching pupils about the past in Jordan, Arwa Badan [ARCH & ARCH]
14 November – Fire, War and Flood: Destruction and Reconstruction of World Heritage Sites, Christopher Doppelhoffer [ARCH & ARCH]
27 October – title and speaker to be confirmed [TAS]
24 November – title and speaker to be confirmed [TAS]

A Note on Further Numbers
Since the start of the year our CBA North numbers of members have continued to grow; some five new members have joined us. Welcome to them one and all of them! At the start of the year the views of our website looked like;

It is therefore pleasing to see that our January and February emails have been well received and that website numbers continue at the same sort of level;

It is with your support that CBA North thrives and is able to support such conferences, and work within the CBA family, as that described below. This is much appreciated by Committee and gives us a purpose for the future.

Can March’s figure be better again? That is also up to you as members, particularly our group members, to help spread the word as we spread your news to everyone else. Already the next email to you is under construction (but whether we send that later this month or the start of April has yet to be decided), so please feel free to send on any news in the meantime.

Northern Prehistory: Connected Communities: a Tullie House conference reviewed
Elsa Price and Kate Sharpe, instigators and co-organisers of the Northern Prehistory conference have given us a review of their wide-ranging conference. CBA North Committee was very pleased to be able to support this conference looking at many different aspects of prehistory of sites, current research on sites and finds, how to research and present it. They write;
 
‘Tullie House’s first in-house conference was held at the museum over the weekend of the 12 and 13 October 2019. This was generously supported with a grant from CBA North and supported with bursaries for students by the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society.


‘As Curator of Human History [Elsa], I teamed up with archaeology researcher, Dr Kate Sharpe from Durham University to try and replicate our own exchange of ideas and perspectives of Cumbrian prehistory on a larger stage. As intended, the conference attracted delegates from across a diverse range of sectors. The 75 attendees represented commercial archaeology units, museums and learning, various heritage sites, academics, students, community archaeology groups and private researchers and amateurs. This bringing together of a wide variety of backgrounds was a key objective of the conference, recognising that multiple organisations, groups and individuals are working in similar areas, yet seldom have the opportunity to share and develop through networking with one another.


A network of museum curators, education officers, CBA North members and others – all conference attendees – listening to interpretation consultant Dot Boughton explain all about the Bewcastle cauldron

‘The keynote presentation was delivered by Professor Richard Bradley of Reading University and the programme included 11 sessions across the weekend including discussions on: what we mean by ‘Northern Prehistory’, material culture, access and engagement, the Langdale axe quarries, and the major site of Stainton West. A conference discussion was led by Paul Frodsham and concluded that there was an active community of people who wanted to do more with both Cumbrian and wider northern prehistory, and are keen to form stronger relationships with other disciplines and organisations. It was also noted that Cumbria should not viewed as “northern” but rather central to the British Isles, and future research work should aim to connect with Yorkshire, southern Scotland and Ireland. Delegates requested that contact details be shared and Tullie House has been compiling a database to help facilitate networking and potentially generate future projects. This contact bank has now been compiled and distributed. Anyone wishes to obtain a copy can do so by emailing me at elsa.price@tulliehouse.org.

A Connected Community of the past; some of Mesolithic Stainton West explained

‘For Tullie House, the permanent Prehistory Gallery had had no major development since its installation in 1991. The recent development of the new displays meant that reconnecting and exploring the findings and ideas from the Cumbrian prehistory community was essential. This ensured that the gallery refresh embraced recent thinking and now better reflects the whole county. The new gallery was part of the focus of this conference, to demonstrate how the results of research and fieldwork can be disseminated to wide audience base. Supporting this central idea were talks from a variety of museum and heritage professionals addressing the challenges of curating prehistory-based school sessions. Papers were presented from Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums (Kathryn Wharton), Leeds Museums and Galleries (Emily Nelson) and Durham University Library and Heritage Collections (Paddy Holland). Alongside this Gabrielle Heffernan, curatorial manager at Tullie House spoke about how best to access and museum’s research collections. Bolstering these talks were practical education-based workshops from Sarah Forster from Tullie House, an optional trip to the prehistoric landscape of Moor Divock led by Emma Watson and a knapping demonstration by James Dilly from Ancient Craft.

Another part of the new displays; with video showing knapping as demonstrated at the conference, original artefacts within the case and handling materials attached to the bench

‘For those working in commercial and academic archaeology the conference provided a valuable opportunity to catch up on work being done across the county, to learn about new approaches and interpretations, and to make both research and business connections in a relaxed environment. The positive messages from national heritage organisations were also well received and will perhaps encourage more fieldwork to investigate the rich array of prehistoric landscapes across the county. The declared intention of Tullie House to foster increased access to collections was also extremely encouraging and will hopefully see both students and more experienced researchers turn their attention to the wealth of Cumbrian artefacts held by the museum.  
 
‘Additional activities included post-conference drinks and a conference dinner. Overall, the conference was extremely well-received with all delegates indicating that they would like to attend similar interdisciplinary events in the future. Feedback also indicated that attendees would have liked more museum gallery time built into the schedule, and that they found the parallel sessions frustrating as they were unable to attend all talks. The closing discussion revealed that almost all audience members would have liked to attend the museum education-based talks, and yet the majority chose the alternative parallel session, perhaps sticking within their own comfort zones. The parallel format was an inevitable compromise used in order to balance the objective of including as many as possible of the wide range of speakers who all submitted high quality papers. Perhaps however, rather than making the sessions thematic in the traditional fashion as we did, we could in future make them truly interdisciplinary. Mixing up sessions might feel a little odd, but our experience suggests that, in terms of improved exchanges between disciplines, the rewards might be significant!’.

Our thanks to Elsa and Kate for this write-up and organising what was a most enjoyable conference – of so many different parts. Of especial note are the follow-up’s to that conference in the networks set up and renewed, they are there to use. (If you have an idea or proposal on what CBA North Committee should give a grant to aid this year, please feel free to get in touch).

The 2019 Elgee Memorial Lecture: Durham and Dunbar
Maureen Norrie, Editor of the Teesside Archaeological Society’s Bulletin, has written to us of another connected community of the past – those soldiers of the Scottish army imprisoned at Durham – and also of a community of the present in how the annual Elgee Memorial Lecture works between a number of local groups. By the kind permission of the Teesside Archaeological Society we reproduce her write-up, which also appears in the current TAS Bulletin, for everyone in the CBA North membership. She writes;

‘This year’s Elgee Memorial Lecture (7 December 2019, Dorman Museum, Middlesbrough) was a ‘flagship’ event for TAS. It was our turn to host it on a once-in-four-years occasion, taking turns to do so with three other local Societies: Cleveland Naturalists Club, Cleveland and Teesside Local History Society, and Cleveland Industrial Archaeology Society. It is co-hosted annually by the Dorman Museum in honour of Frank Elgee (1881-1972) ‘archaeologist, geologist and naturalist, who is probably the best-known Curator of the Dorman Museum and [who] made a lifelong study of the North Yorkshire Moors, including its archaeology’ (Phil Philo, TAS Bulletin 2017, p.22).
 
That’ll be one of them Scottish soldiers, then’. In his talk on ‘Durham and Dunbar, Scottish soldiers at Palace Green’, Richard Annis (Archaeological Services, Durham University) described the unexpected discovery in 2013 of two (partial) mass graves in an overgrown, enclosed, yard on the western side of Palace Green, Durham, during preliminary works for the construction of a Café at Palace Green Library. The bones did indeed prove to be (as a digger-operator predicted) Scottish soldiers: prisoners-of-war from the Battle of Dunbar, 3 September 1650, who survived an eight-day forced march from the battle-site to Durham, only to die in Durham of (mostly) dysentery.


Elgee Memorial Lecture, Dorman Museum 2019. Centre Richard Annis (speaker), Freya Horsfield and Kira-May Charley (Chair and Deputy Chair respectively of TAS, either side of Richard)

‘The talk included not only the dead soldiers, and what forensic investigations could reveal about their lives; but also what could be learned about their surviving comrades, some of whom were transported to America and, after a period of indentured labour, remained there. Full details are included in ‘Lost Lives, New Voices: unlocking the stories of the Scottish soldiers from the Battle of Dunbar 1650’, co-authored by C Gerrard, P Graves, A Millard, R Annis, and A Caffell.

‘The bones were reburied in Elvet Hill Road Cemetery, Durham City, in May 2018, and a permanent headstone installed. There are also plaques to their memory in the site where the bones were discovered; and in Durham Cathedral (their former prison) alongside the altar to Queen Margaret of Scotland, in the Chapel of the Nine Altars’.

The Elgee Memorial Lecture as Maureen indicated also a connected community of groups interested in the varied interests of Frank Elgee. A list of all the previous Elgee Lectures, together with the host organisation, can be found on the TAS website here. Can you fill in the blanks for the missing lectures? Were you there? We are sure that TAS and their partners would welcome that information.

CBA National news;
1) The Birmingham National-Regional CBA Groups meeting

Claire Corkill, Development Manager, has written of what is underway between CBA National and the other Regional CBA Groups. These notes show how your responses from the December 2018 survey and March 2019 are being taken on to help shape both North and National direction for a better future.


Claire writes;
‘CBA North is part of a network of regional groups across England and Wales all working with the shared goal of ‘Archaeology for All’ and helping to create opportunities for more people to get involved with archaeology. Representatives from the CBA and the CBA regional groups met in Birmingham in January to discuss opportunities to work together more closely in the future.

‘Part of the inspiration for this meeting were the outcomes of the CBA’s audience development survey funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund (NLHF) and undertaken by Tricolor 2018-2019. Many thanks to those of you who completed the survey or participated in one of the associated workshops. The survey highlighted the value of the regional groups, and January’s meeting was the first in a number of conversations that aim to develop the relationships between the regional groups and look at ways to improve communications and share ideas and information. Our next meeting of the CBA regional groups is already planned for a Saturday in June.

‘The CBA are currently preparing a further bid to the NLHF and regional group representatives had the opportunity to share their thoughts on elements, such as a possible new CBA website, digital assets and skills development. The development of this work in conjunction with the regional groups will help enable the CBA to provide more beneficial support, creating new opportunities to work together in the future, helping the groups to become more resilient and create more opportunities for members to get involved with archaeology’.

A CBA North’s comment on Claire’s notes is below; 
 
‘We cannot say if many CBA North members took part in the online survey, only you can know if you or group did, however a goodly number did – but we thank you nonetheless. We were especially pleased to act as host for one of the only three on-the-ground workshops in Newcastle last year, and thank those members and friends who attended that event.

‘It is pleasing to see that work from the survey and workshops is being taken on board by CBA National. Many of you have felt that there has not enough prominence and support of the local-regional-national family in evidence over recent years. However, to our mind this work is actively reinvigorating all parts of the family. Your views so far have been carried into the report of the survey, as well as in our representation at Birmingham, and at other meetings, for you. Already the next CBA regional groups meeting is in our diary for June. Your views, comments and feedback are most welcome at any time, useful to us and where possible enacted upon …but we do need them in the first instance.

‘We are looking at a possible April event primarily for our local group members within the CBA North network (perhaps for those groups who are not yet members as well?). This may be on who, how and what and we are currently doing – and importantly what you/they would like to do in the future. We approach the end of our own current five year plan and this, combined with the revitalisation of CBA National, gives a chance to look ahead, perhaps a bit more definitely within that CBA family of local-regional-national groups’.

2) CBA National’s Communication and Participation in Archaeology Survey: some initial results and a thank you!
In our last email to you we also carried the links to a current CBA National survey as pictured below. Thank you to all of those that on contributed to that survey. This very much follows on from the Birmingham meeting described above by Claire.

James Rose, who you will remember is CBA National’s Communications and Marketing Manager, writes of the survey results;

‘The CBA recently ran a survey on communication and participation in archaeology. The aim was to gather evidence that demonstrated whether there was public demand for some of the changes and improvements the CBA would like to make to their website in support of an application to the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

‘Firstly a huge thank you to those that contributed. The response was fantastic! Almost 800 people completed the survey from a cross-section of people with all levels of interest in archaeology. They results show that people are keen for more news and content, information about careers and learning and, crucially, more ways to participate. CBA regional groups are vital to providing those opportunities. These results show what valuable work they do and how much potential there is to grow with local group and individual members. You can view the initial findings on the CBA blog here. A short video lasting a minute has also been prepared giving many of the responses to the survey, many showing the value of archaeology in other ways. This can be found as this YouTube video.

‘If you have any more comments or suggestions, please do get in touch through the links here for CBA National or CBA North‘.

County Durham Archaeology Day: Saturday 21 March 2020
Tracey Donnelly, of the Archaeology Team, Durham County Council, has sent us details of this year’s County Durham Archaeology Day. This year it is slightly later than normal, but nonetheless if you’re interested in archaeology come along and find out more. This year’s fascinating talks will be:

– New Investigations at the East Park Roman Settlement, Sedgefield. Josh Hogue, DigVentures
– Excavation at Binchester Roman Fort 2019. Steve Collison, Northern Archaeological Associates
– The First Ever Excavations at Middleham Castle, Bishop Middleham. Josh Hogue, DigVentures
– Excavations at Walworth Deserted Medieval Village. Richard Carlton, The Archaeological Practice
– Investigations on the North Terrace of Auckland Castle 2019. Jamie Armstrong, Archaeological Services Durham University
– The Discovery of Bek’s Chapel at Auckland Castle. John Castling, The Auckland Project
– The Portable Antiquities Scheme 2019. Benjamin Westwood, Finds Liaison Officer Durham and Tees

The essential details are;

Location: Council Chamber, County Hall, (there is ample free parking at County Hall, and County Hall is well served with public transport. Durham City Park and Ride Scheme buses also stop at County Hall).
Time: 9:50am – 4:00pm. Doors Open at 9:15 AM
Cost: £18.00 which includes buffet lunch, teas & coffees; £14.00 for full-time students, please let us know if you have any dietary requirements, or require a vegetarian lunch.

Tickets sell out very quickly so book early to avoid disappointment.

To book and pay for a place online follow https://doitonline.durham.gov.uk/ and click on ‘More Services’ and select ‘Archaeology Day – Order Tickets’ or contact 03000 260000 if you wish to book and pay over the phone. Please note that requests for tickets to be sent out in the post will incur a £1 postage and packing fee.

There will be displays by local societies and archaeological contractors as well as bookstalls in the adjacent Durham Room. As noted CBA North will be there with a stall, we as CBA North might even have some bargain books for sale there. We cannot promise that they will be those below, but there might be.

CBA North: February news

CBA North News

Dear Members and Friends of CBA North,

The first month of the year, indeed of this decade, has now gone. With February’s start a number of other group start their 2020 programmes – indeed with a meeting tonight at Berwick of the Border Archaeological Society – and there are 12 events that we have now listed in our website’s pages to go with the 70 or so that we sent you earlier.

CBA National have been working hard with the results from the survey carried out at the end of 2018 and workshops across the country – such as we invited you to at Newcastle in March – last year. There is now another survey for how the CBA National website might be changed; your views are important for what you want from us as part of a regional and national family of individuals and groups interested in archaeology, history and heritage. James Rose, from CBA National, explains more below on the survey.

Whilst it was not planned that this issue mainly covers Hadrian’s Wall, it turns out that two of our items this month relate to that monument that almost literally divides out CBA North region in half. This includes the poster for the Hadrian’s Wall Archaeology Forum to come, as well as a chance to revisit (or re-hear?) something heard on the radio last month. Would you like further newsletter emails focussed to a period, topic or theme? Or would you like a mix? Feel free to let us know your thoughts.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
03.02.2020

2020 Local Society and Group Events – new additions
As noted above some 12 further events have been added to our list of local society and group events that we issued at the start of the year – the first of these additions was sent to us by Gill Goodfellow of the West of Cumbria Archaeological Society for their 14 February lecture. Other events, and dates, have come through the course of January for other groups again.

There are now something like 80 events listed. Please continue to let us know any additions and/or alterations for the Events as well as any changes in the details for the Local societies and groups page.

For those that may have printed out a copy of the Events list, here is a consolidated block of those ‘new’ dates, organised by date, which you can also print and ‘patch’ over your earlier printout.

5 February – AGM and presentations [TYNEDALE]
14 February – A Review of Salt-making in Cumberland, Andrew Fielding [WCAS]
22 February – Finding Crin’s Fremlington, Perry Gardner [ARCH & ARCH]
March – date and title to be announced [ARCH & ARCH]
15 April – Patterns of Movement: prehistoric rock art in the Cumbrian fells, Kate Sharpe [NAG]
18 April – Medieval Pottery Project, Tony Metcalfe [ARCH & ARCH]
16 May – Mini study day on Tutankhamun, Penny Wilson [NEAES]
May – AGM, date and title of follow lecture to be announced [ARCH & ARCH]
30 May – The Friendly Desert; Recording the Landscape of the Hatnub Alabaster Quarries, Hannah Pethen [NEAES]
11 July – The Princesses’ Burial; New Research in the Valley of the Kings KV63, Prof Susanne Bickel [NEAES]
18 July – Festival of Archaeology lecture, details to be announced [ARCH & ARCH]
10 October – Function and use of terracotta and other figurines in the Ptolemaic and Roman Periods in Egypt, Ross Thomas [NEAES]

Hadrian’s Wall Archaeology Forum
This year is a leap year – a relatively unusual occurrence, as is the appearance of the Hadrian’s Wall Archaeology Forum in February.

This is the Hadrian’s Wall Archaeology Forum held over from last year. However, as ever, this looks an interesting series of talks dealing with the sites and finds of this well-known monument. The poster includes contacts details and ticket prices – early booking is advised!

CBA National’s Communication and Participation in Archaeology Survey

James Rose, CBA National’s Communications and Marketing Manager, writes to us with details of CBA National’s current survey. He notes;

‘The Council for British Archaeology has ambitious plans to ensure that more people have the opportunity to discover archaeological heritage. As part of this, we are preparing an application to the National Lottery Heritage Fund to enable us to develop new resources and new ways of engaging with people interested in archaeology.

We think a new website with different kinds of content will be an important part of this, but we want to make sure that our plans meet the need of the widest possible audience. We are hoping that, should we receive funding, there will be a real opportunity to give regional groups and their members more ways to communicate and participate.

The survey takes around five minutes to complete, and once you have completed it you have the chance to be entered into a prize draw for a £25 Love2Shop voucher, accepted at over 200,000 high street stores.’

To take part in the survey, please click this link. The survey should only take about five minutes to complete. As ever please feel free to contact CBA North Committee with your views as necessary; our own contact details are unchanged as cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org.

Archaeological and forensic palynology: an interview with Pat Wiltshire
One of the ways we know so much of Hadrian’s Wall is through study of its contemporary landscape, its structures and natural materials utilised (such as the turf wall, as well as raw materials for man and/as well as beast, whether for artefact or not).

As such Hadrian’s Wall briefly featured on The Life Scientific when Pat Wiltshire was interviewed by Jim Al-Khalili on 7 January 2020. In an interesting interview the use of pollen to reconstruct archaeological landscapes was outlined, and latterly its use in criminal investigations, was described.

One of those sites investigated by Wiltshire for archaeological purposes include the well-known Cumbrian fort of Birdoswald for the 1987-92 excavations within the fort, which can be found here. This may not be a listen suitable for everyone (more so especially for the forensic aspects) – it was broadcast after the watershed – but is still available to listen to from the programme’s pages on the BBC Radio 4 website here.

CBA North: October Events

CBA North News
Our CBA North news contains, as ever, a number of notices of events across the CBA North region – but in particular for Cumbria this time. In particular we are especially pleased to send you details of a regional archaeology conference in Carlisle, which your committee has felt privileged to be asked to support and has so agreed to support. We also have a short update on a Cumbrian project previously featured in our emails to you.

In addition our usual listing of events include those to come soon this month. These are from all round the CBA North region. However, also as ever, the sharp-eyed will notice changes on our Events website page (with two slight changes in details and 20 completely new entries), including those of our member groups the Appleby Archaeology Group, Coquetdale Community Archaeology and the Northumberland Archaeological Group.

We hope you that you enjoy these events and that you might contribute something, perhaps of your own local group’s activities this summer?, that you think that others might enjoy or should know of for our next issue.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee,
01.10.2019

Connected Communities: Northern Prehistory Conference: Tickets now available

The rock art motif and landscape of Long Meg, Cumbria, photographed by, and copyright of, Scott Wrigglesworth

Elsa Price, Curator at Tullie House Museum, Carlisle, has written a further piece outlining the conference which we sent in an earlier email to you. She writes of the two day conference;

‘I am pleased to announce that tickets are now available for the Northern Prehistory: Connected Communities conference at Tullie House in partnership with Durham University on the 12th and 13th October.

Professor Richard Bradley of Reading University, author of many articles and books on prehistory, will be delivering a speech on “North by North West: Sharing Problems and Answers” to set the scene for the conference. This weekend will bring together a range of professionals from archaeological units, curators, museum educators, students, academics and community centred groups and explore the interdisciplinary nature of the connections within Northern Prehistory.

The conference will be a great opportunity to discuss how public-facing heritage sites and projects can interact with and utilise archaeological and academic expertise. With the inclusion of Prehistory to the National Curriculum in 2014 both schoolchildren and the wider public are becoming interested in their prehistoric heritage, making this an important time to inspire new research and engagement that will move Northern prehistory into the 21st Century. Additionally the National Lottery and Heritage Fund is also placing greater stress upon the impact upon and diversity of participants and audiences in their sponsored projects, so I hope that this weekend will inspire further projects.

Tickets are £50 and will give delegates access to a full day of talks on Saturday (12th October), a half day of talks on the Sunday (13th of October) morning with an afternoon of interactive sessions and workshops to help develop your own local group projects. Lunch and refreshments, on both days, are included with the ticket fee. Conference tickets also grant attendees free access to the museum for the weekend of the conference.

Tickets are now available through the Tullie House box office. Please call 01228 618700 or visit Eventbrite (for which a small booking fee applies) here.

Bursaries
The Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society will award four Clare Fell Fund Bursaries of up to £150 each to students to attend this conference.

Applications (no need for an application form) should be made direct to the society treasurer Dr W D Shannon at treasurer@cumbriapast.org giving name, address, age, institution attended, course i.e. graduate/post-graduate and any special interests. Applications for one of these bursaries should be made as soon as possible.

Sponsorship
This conference has been kindly sponsored by the Council for British Archaeology North. 

Further Information and Enquiries
Please see the conference programme below. For further information please visit the Tullie House website. For any other enquiries please contact me, Elsa Price, through my own email address here, or my colleague Kate Sharpe through her email address here‘.

The programme
This is a provisional programme and may be subject to change

Day 1: Saturday 12th October
09:30 Registration, Tea and Coffee served in the function room

SESSION 1 (Lecture Theatre): 10:00 – 10:30
10:00 Welcome: Gabrielle Heffernan
10:10 Introduction: Elsa Price and Kate Sharpe
10:30 Keynote: Richard Bradley “North by northwest: sharing problems and asking questions”

11:15-11:30 Short comfort break

SESSION 2: SETTING THE SCENE
Chair: Kate Sharpe
Lecture Theatre: 11:30-12:45
11:30 Something for everyone: Early Prehistory in North West England
Sue Stallibrass, Historic England
11:55 Prehistory in the Lake District: recent discoveries and future research
Eleanor Kingston, LDNPA Archaeology Officer
12:20 Recent landscape studies in Cumbria and the potential for further research
Joel Goodchild, Archaeological Research Services Ltd
12:45 Presenting Prehistory
Elsa Price, Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery
13:10 END

13:10-14:00 Lunch served in function room

SESSION 3A and B (Lecture Theatre + Meeting Room): 13:45-15:15
3B: TRACES of LIFE and DEATH  
Lecture Theatre
Chair: Paul Frodsham
3A: EARLY ENCOUNTERS with PREHISTORY
Meeting Room
Chair: Elsa Price
14:00 Early Neolithic settlement and votive deposition in Cumbria and beyond
David Cockcroft, Robin Holgate and Clive Waddington (Archaeological Research Services Ltd Abstract)
Preparing for Prehistory. Creating a schools engagement programme from scratch
Kathryn Wharton, Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums
14:25 Monumentality, mortality, metalwork and Morecambe
Brendon Wilkins (DigVentures), Stuart Noon (DigVentures), Edward Caswell (Portable Antiquities Scheme), Johanna Ungemach (DigVentures) and Benjamin Roberts (Durham University)
Curating education: A collaborative approach to developing an object-based prehistory offer
Katherine Baxter and Emily Nelson, Leeds Museums and Galleries
14:50 Early Bronze Age burial and funerary practices in Cumbria and beyond
David Cockcroft and Ben Dyson (Archaeological Research Services Ltd Abstract)
Facing the challenge of teaching Key Stage 2 audiences about Prehistory at the Museum
Paddy Holland, Durham University Library and Heritage Collections Learning Team
15:15 Rock art without borders: ‘Cumbrian’ carvings in a wider context
Kate Sharpe, Durham University
Researching Museums Collections
Gabrielle Heffernan, Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery
15:40 END END

15:40-16:10 Tea and coffee served in function room

SESSION 4A and B (Lecture Theatre + Meeting Room): 15:30-17:00 
4A: THE PURSUIT of STUFF
 Lecture Theatre Chair: Elsa Price
4B: THE AXE FACTOR
 Meeting Room Chair: Kate Sharpe
16:10 People and their pots: the Bronze Age pottery of Cumbria
Clara Freer, Exeter University
Searching for hidden treasures: finding and recording Neolithic stone axes in Cumbria
Sally Taylor, Oxford University
16:35 Prehistoric Treasures from Cumbria: Tullie House Museum Acquisitions & Artefacts recorded with the Portable Antiquities Scheme
Dot Boughton, freelance archaeological services
Hansel and Gretel in Neolithic Yorkshire: what might they teach us of the stone axe distribution routes?
David P. Davidson
17:00 Living among the monuments: lithic scatters in the Vale of Eden, Cumbria
Antony Dickson, Annie Hamilton-Gibney and Aaron Watson
“Follow the groove, man.” An exploration of the role of wayfaring and movement in the landscape of the Langdale axe factories, Cumbria
Marnie Calvert, University of Glasgow
17:25 END END

17:30-18:30 Self-guided gallery tour
19:00 Conference dinner. Please either meet in the reception area at 18:30 to walk to the restaurant or meet directly there for dinner at 19:00.

Day 2: Sunday 13th October
10:00 – 10:30 Tea and coffee served in the function room

SESSION 5A and 5B (Lecture Theatre + Meeting Room): 10:00-11:20
5B: MONUMENTAL LANDSCAPES
Meeting Room
Chair: Kate Sharpe
5A: STAINTON
Lecture Theatre
Chair: Gabrielle Heffernan
10:30 Monuments on the mountains: recent fieldwork at boulder-built structures in the Lake District fells
Aaron Watson, Peter Style, Peter Rodgers
Stainton West and beyond
Fraser Brown and Helen Evans, Oxford Archaeology North
10:55 The brilliance of the Shap prehistoric landscape
Emma Watson, Durham University
After CNDR: the bigger Neolithic picture
Helen Evans, Oxford Archaeology North
11:20 Long Meg: at the heart of Neolithic Britain
Paul Frodsham
Social networking in an age without social media. Understanding variation in lithic technology from Late Mesolithic Structures at the site of Stainton West near Carlisle
Robert Rhys Needham, UCLAN
11:45 END END

 
11:45-12:00 Comfort break

SESSION 6 Closing Discussion (Lecture Theatre)
12:00 Closing discussion: The future of northern Prehistory
 Led by Paul Frodsham
12:30 END

 
 12:30-13:30: Lunch served in cafeteria
  

SESSION 7: PREHISTORY IN ACTION
Meeting Room
13:30 Workshop – Tullie House Prehistory Schools Session: A Practical Guide
Sarah Forster, Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery
14:30 Workshop – Axe Knapping
James Dilley, Ancient Craft UK
15:30 Guided Prehistory Gallery Tour
Elsa Price, Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery
16:30 Self-Guided gallery time
17:00 END

Regular October 2019 Events
6 October – James IV Memorial Lecture: In the Land of the Giants – a journey through the Dark Ages, Max Adams [TILLVAS]

7 October – Carpow, Corbridge and Carlisle: Roman armour developments in Northern Britain, Dr Jon Coulson [BAS]
9 October – First Farmers in Neolithic Britain: new methods, new interpretations, Prof Peter Rowley-Conwy [NAG]
10 October – Appleby Moot Hall, Marion Barter [APPLEBY]
12 October – An Introduction to Anglo-Saxon Church Architecture in Stone and Early Vernacular Buildings focusing on Medieval longhouses and their Post-Medieval derivatives, Alan Newham and Martin Roberts respectively [ALTOGETHER]
12 October – Re-opening the Medieval Castle: micro-stories from material culture, Dr Karen Dempsey [ARCH & ARCH]

12 October – My Favourite Things in the Egypt Centre, Carolyn Graves-Brown [NEAES]
13 October – David Dippie Dixon lectures: Exploring an historic townscape and its hinterland: Wallingford from Saxon to late Medieval, and Bell towers: origins, forms and functions, Prof Neil Christie [CCA]
14 October – Binchester Roman Fort, David Mason [LUNESDALE]
29 October – Rock Art of the uKhahlamba-Drakensberg in South Africa, Aron Mazel [TAS]
30 October – The Manorial Documents Register For Northumberland, Sue Wood [SOCANTS]

CBA North: mid-June newsletter

CBA North News

Our email to you this time is another mixture of content – from a number of sources also – and from around the CBA North region.

Following our usual events listing for the remains of June, we’ve a contribution from a member on how archaeology has inspired their artistic work and studies, something looking ahead to a conference in October (not that we are wishing summer away already), notes on recent publications, posters for events (including one happening on Saturday) and throughout the summer, as well as a book sale. There is so much yet to come in the intervening months, such as July’s Festival of Archaeology no less!

As ever we continue to keep our Events website page up-to-date with details – three further talks have been added, as well as the title of another now confirmed, on that page since our last email to you. Please let us know any additions or alterations to that page or indeed the listing below.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
19.06.2019

June and July Events 2019
June 2019
3 June – Gods and heroes: public and private in Pompeian houses, Dr Thea Ravesi [BAS]
5 June – Riding West: Roman Cavalry Tombstones at Hexham & Beyond, Lindsay Allason-Jones [TILLVAS]
25 June – The Yarm Helmet, Chris Caple [TAS]
26 June – Paints and Pigments in the Past: colouring in the Roman Frontiers, Louisa Campbell [SOCANTS]

July 2019
13 July – Work in Thebes, Jose Manuel Galan [NEAES]
20 July – The Archaeology of Domestic Innovation in the Country House, Prof Marilyn Palmer [ARCH & ARCH]
31 July – From Women’s Rights to Human Rights: How the Struggle for the Vote Changed the World, Rosie Serdiville [SOCANTS]

Archaeology, Pots and back again (twice): a member explains all
Lorraine Clay, both a member of Tynedale Archaeology and CBA North groups, as well as potter has sent us this short article on how archaeology inspires her artistic work. She writes;

‘I’m a ceramic artist who draws inspiration from archaeology, this is ponderings on archaeology and pottery.

I’ve always been interested in Archaeology since Dad took us to The Wall when children and finding rock art with Mum as a teenager. When I studied A Level Archaeology in 1990 for something to do after work, I couldn’t have imagined the path that it would take. The A Level was so disorganised that I swore I would never do another qualification and looked for a leisure evening class: woodwork was daytime so I plumped for pottery.

One of my first pieces was directly inspired by Scottish Celtic crosses, then direct influences came from visiting Minoan sites in Greece: these included the 6’ tall storage jars in Malia with coils as thick as an arm, and the curious kernos vessels in Heraklion Museum. You can learn a lot from copying something – such as the challenges the potter faced – one Greek pot I was having trouble with the handles, I put my mind in the place of a hot tired potter who wanted to drink Raki in the shade, and there it was! The simplest and quickest method looked just right.

A Cretan Krater

As I approached 13 years with the Civil Service I took the plunge to devote myself to becoming a full-time potter. I began studies at Newcastle College and for four years sold work in galleries and exhibitions and ran evening classes. In 2006 I commenced the Contemporary Ceramics degree at Newcastle and was accepted to be the pottery tutor for Ashmore House, an NHS mental health daycentre. Newcastle gave me the impetus to be more experimental and I began weathering clay, a technique I still practice today.

Weathering is inspired by mortality: a fingerprint survives on a Minoan storage jar, a Neolithic vessel is patterned with nail impressions but the potter is long gone. A cat’s paw-print on a Roman roof tile…

Like ceramics we believe we are immortal, living for tomorrow we stay in unsatisfying jobs until walking home in a gale a dislodged gargoyle takes us out. (I heard this story many years ago on the radio of a man dying this way after gales in Scotland; googling it now I find a US woman died in 2014 from a falling gargoyle – maybe it’s not rare at all!).

We are more like unfired clay, endangered by random circumstances, wind and rain.  I think this is why I joined Altogether Archaeology: too many years had gone by without digging, I couldn’t resist any more: my knees were in remission. On my first molehill survey I found a jet bead and was hooked again. And it seemed natural to get permission to take a little of the clay we dug up home!

Lorraine at the Whitley Castle mole-hill survey

In 2016 I took a chance and applied to the Ness of Brodgar and was euphoric when I was accepted!

Weathered bowl before firing (above), weathering and wood-fired (below left and right respectively)

Sometimes I use archive materials and clay from archaeological sites. For an exhibition at the Durham Oriental Museum I morphed cuneiform envelopes into curvaceous “promise boxes” using Forest Hall clay following their ancient Middle East counterparts.

For a second exhibition I was delighted with a label just bearing the name Petrie on one vase: I made pieces celebrating the people, including Flinders Petrie, in the chain that had brought the artefact to Durham using clay from digs. William Thacker, who set up the Oriental Museum, is shown by the transfer print which on smoke-fired Low Hauxley clay.


When the daycentre closed it didn’t take long to become bored. I heard you didn’t need an archaeology degree to do an Archaeology postgraduate course, so I contacted Antonia Thomas at UHI (University of the Highlands and Islands), who told me she was starting an Art and Archaeology module the following week!

3 Orkney clays: Back row – unfired with shell: unfired without shell
Front row – fired with shell: unfired without shell.

I enjoyed it so much I applied to UHI and Durham to do an MA in Archaeology, focusing especially on the British Neolithic. Deciding between the two was one of the toughest decisions I’ve had to make! Two terms in and I find myself writing about ceramics not rock art – in Dolni Vestonice, Gravettian finger fluting, materials analysis: before I knew it, I was suggesting Clay in the Palaeolithic for my dissertation! Watch this space!…….’ 

[Many thanks to Lorraine for writing this article; if this has inspired you or you want to share your own archaeological inspiration, perhaps in different ways, please feel free to send us a short article to us at cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org for our next issue].

Tullie House Conference
Elsa Price of Tullie House Museum, Carlisle, and Kate Sharpe of Durham University have sent us the poster below on a busy October weekend they are planning on the prehistory of the Cumbrian area. If you are interested in the day, read on and follow up through the contact details given – contributions from all are most welcome!

(Fairly recent) Tees Archaeology publications
From recent the River Tees Rediscovered Landscape Partnership, Tees Archaeology have fairly recently published a pair of short booklets The First Great Civil War in the Tees Valley and Industry in the Tees Valley. These short well-illustrated freely-available booklets give introductions to the many sites of particular note for their respective subjects.


Whilst many other Civil War battlefields and sieges are known across CBA North’s region, the first of these highlights many of the smaller skirmishes that rarely figure in the national literature. This booklet was written by Robin Daniels and Phil Philo. A further leaflet for the Piercebridge encounter described is also available further down the website page mentioned below.

Industry upon Teesside, however, needs no introduction. However sites familiar and unfamiliar are dealt with in the booklet by Alan Betteney, for the whole variety of Teesside industries, though this is a rather larger file to download. Nevertheless both of these are freely available as downloads from the Tees Archaeology website Downloads page.

TillVAS’ Iron Age Day
Equally industriously in the north of Northumberland, this Saturday sees the Till Valley Archaeology Society hold an Iron Age Day. The poster below gives details of what you can expect, inside and out, at Etal Village Hall to give more of a background and context to their recent excavations at nearby Mardon Farm.

CBA National’s June Booksale
CBA North members might be interested to know that CBA National is having a Spring Sale on publications. They have reduced prices on more than 75 books including many of our recent Research Reports and Practical Handbooks. Their online shop can be visited here. The sale ends on 30 June 2019 so ideal for finding some holiday reading and/or post-exam relaxation.

Prehistoric Pioneers: an Exhibition and Events
Charley Robson, of Durham University’s Prehistoric Pioneers Education and Outreach Team, has written to let us know of this exhibition. She writes;

‘The Prehistoric Pioneers exhibition is now open to the public at the Durham Museum of Archaeology, Palace Green, Durham, until 24 November 2019. The exhibition explores life in ancient Britain, from warfare to rituals, and the way Bronze Age people buried weapons and treasure in hidden hoards. Curated by the Durham’s MA Museum and Artefact Studies students, this exhibition gives a face to prehistoric people and challenges the idea that these were primitive cultures. 
 
To coincide with the exhibition, a pair of talks have been planned to take place on the 20 and 24 June and which are detailed in the poster below. Some more details on these events are given below for those who might be interested to attend. Booking information is given through the poster and places can be booked in emailing archaeology.museum@durham.ac.uk. Further information on the exhibition, including that available who cannot get to Durham themselves, as a series of podcasts is available here‘.

CBA North: further events to come

Dear CBA North Members,

The clocks now changed, the weather has also. Summer has ended – but CBA North has been busy. Whilst we put together more news of our own activities, and look forward to carrying your news for others to hear of, CBA North Committee has also been slightly changing. More details in the next email.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 30.10.2018

Further events added to our website
Further regular local society events of our group members, and more, continue to be added to our Events page on the website throughout the year. This lists some events through to May next year; if you would like something added, please feel to get in touch.

Lake District National Park’s Annual Conference
Louise Martin, who spoke at our April 2017 conference, now of the Lake District National Park Authority, has written to us with a poster of the park’s annual conference. Please note the closing date for booking which is close at hand this week.

Arbeia Society Conference
Paul Bidwell, who gave a quick resume of last year’s Carlisle meeting of the Study Group for Roman Pottery, has also sent us a pair of posters for the Arbeia Society’s conference this year.

A quick question to CBA North members
A quick question for you – feedback is always helpful from members and others. Would you like to see more emails at irregular intervals as we become aware of events? Or would you like less emails at more regular intervals?

Your answer will help in the timetabling of the behind the scenes of work of CBA North Committee who, of course, welcome your views at any time. We’ll let you know the results also in our next email.

Forthcoming lectures tonight and this week across CBA North

CBA North News
This week sees a number of events across the CBA North region. There are events in Berwick (this evening), Newcastle and Appleby (Wednesday and Thursday evenings respectively) on a range of project and sites inside and outside of our area, from groups inside and outside of our network. There is plenty to take your choice from, and more again to come soon as news to you. If you would like to submit anything of your local groups recent activities or plans for the summer please let us know.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
09.04.2018

Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the stories of the Scottish soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650
Richard Annis, Senior Archaeologist at Archaeological Services Durham University, writes to us giving us a foretaste of his Berwick lecture to the Border Archaeological Society [BAS in our events listing] tonight and whose results will appear in a forthcoming book and exhibition on these soldiers.

Janet at work; a photo by North News for Durham University

Richard writes;
“In November 2013, human bones were found during building work at Durham’s Palace Green. The excavation that followed found the skeletons of 28 young men in two mass graves. A long and painstaking archaeological project showed that they were some of over 1600 Scottish prisoners who lost their lives at Durham after the Battle of Dunbar in 1650.

“A new book, to be published this June, tells their story; their lives before the battle, how they came to Durham, how they died, and how they came to have disappeared from view for over 360 years. These were ordinary people, caught up in extraordinary events. As a result of the project, we know more about them than any comparable group from 17th-century Scotland. The story also looks at some of their fellow prisoners; men who survived their captivity and regained their freedom. Some went on to new lives, unimaginable to them before the battle that changed everything, in new landscapes on the edge of the known world.

“The exhibition Bodies of Evidence: How Science Unearthed Durham’s Dark Secret will be told in a major exhibition at Palace Green Library. This will run from 9th June to 7th October 2018, and covers the history, the archaeology and the science that underpinned the project”.

For further information on this multifaceted project, Members and Followers can read more on the Scottish Soldiers blog and see recent facial reconstruction work, putting the practices as also described in a previous BAS talk, a Youtube video.

Wednesday and Thursday’s lectures
On Wednesday, the 11th, our group member the Northumberland Archaeological Group will hear an update on The Peregrini Project: Excavations on Lindisfarne from Richard Carlton of The Archaeological Practice in their monthly Newcastle meeting.

On Thursday, the 12th, in Appleby our group the Appleby Archaeology Group will also hear of The Late Iron Age royal site at Stanwick, North Yorkshire: new perspectives by Professor Colin Haselgrove of Leicester University. At both meetings visitors are most welcome to attend. Details as to the venues and times of all these meetings can be found online through our Local Societies and Groups page of our website here.

Archaeology and the small finds of North-East England

A quick reminder that there is still time to book a place at this conference covered in our last email to you. If you would like to attend please follow this link or see  http://www.aasdn.org.uk/NEarch18.htm for further details.

CBA North’s joint April Conference: Archaeology and the small finds of North-East England

CBA North News
We are delighted to announce the first of the ‘big’ conferences in CBA North region to you as Archaeology and the small finds of North-East England. This is one that we are jointly supporting with the Finds Research Group, our group member the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland as well as Durham University.

Below are details of the programme which covers all periods between the Anglo-Saxon and the 19th century, across much of our region from Coquetdale to Teesside (and just over into Yarm) where specifically named and more besides, this conference promises to be a most interesting and fully packed day. Details on how to book a discounted place as a CBA North member are given below, clicking on the posters will take you to the online booking page.

In case you would like to forward this information onto others, please use the links in the left-hand portion of this email or you can send on the link http://www.aasdn.org.uk/NEarch18.htm.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
03.04.2018

Archaeology and the small finds of North-East England

Various CBA North Committee members will be there, with various discounted books for sale from £2 to £20 on various topics as well, so feel free to have a word with us or at any other time.

Further details on our co-partners for this conference can be found through the various links below;

The Finds Research Group promotes  the study of artefacts from archaeological sites dating from the post-Roman period onwards. It is well-known, even outside finds circles, for producing many datasheets summarising particular classes of objects – some of which can now be downloaded from their website.

– Durham University, and indeed its archaeology department, is no stranger to appearing in CBA North’s materials over many years. Current information on the department can be found online here.

– our group member the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland will be already familiar to you as we’ve announced their various lectures in the past. As a follow-on from the conference on the following day their regular meeting is also given over to a finds-based theme; Dr Eleanor Standley will be giving the lecture Spinning yarns and skinning rabbits in the later Medieval period: new contributions to the archaeology of religion, sexuality and daily life.

CBA National’s Community Archaeology Survey
Readers will recall our last email carried the news of, and link to, a survey of community archaeology. The deadline for this survey has now been extended to Sunday 8 April 2018. Here is the link again in case you have yet to fill in the survey, or can send it to someone else,  https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/CBA_Community_archaeology_2018. Please fill in this survey if you have the time!

The Willington Waggonway and two conferences – events this week

CBA North News
Events continue thick and fast!

With autumn quickly changing to winter our announcements change to notices and events summarising work carried out of previous projects and this year as well. This week’s events follow that trend, so here is a reminder of two events we’ve previously noticed, as well as a third in Scotland, which might be of interest to you.

We already have details for 2018 events from some of the local groups. If you would like to send round details of your group’s events for what is the most read of our emails at the start of the year for everyone else to see, please feel free to send them on.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
13.11.2017

The Willington Waggonway

The Arbeia Society Conference

Edinburgh, Lothian and Borders Archaeology Conference
Here’s another event also happening on Saturday which might also be of interest.

The programme for this day can be found here. Online bookings can be made here.

Vindolanda, violence and war; forthcoming events in CBA North-land

CBA North News
Today our email combines our alphabet of archaeology with the letters V and W with a regular update of events across CBA North-land. This month started with the Belief in the North East conference at Durham University today.

Hot on the heels of the conference are three further events for the Bronze Age, Ancient Egyptians and Mary, Queen of Scots, in this week alone. Vindolanda, violence and war all feature in events this and next month; there is plenty for you to take your pick with (as well as more to come this week)!

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
01.10.2017

Local society events this month
Here is a list of events that we know of, so far, this month. Events, however, continue to be added to our website page – please let us know anything that we are missing!

2 October – “Spears shall be shaken, shields shall be broken”: reconstructing Bronze Age fighting styles, Andrea Dolfini [BAS]
7 October – Cobras, Demons and ‘Fighters’: Demonology in Ancient Egypt, Kasia Szpakowska [NEAES]

8 October – Mary, Queen of Scots, Jordan Evans [TILLVAS]

11 October – The Jomon Period Obsidian Mines in the Hoshikuso Pass, Nagawa, Japan, Pete Topping [NAG]
12 October – Medieval Grave Slabs of Cumbria, Peter Ryder [APPLEBY]
13 October – The Archaeology of Early Steam Locomotives, Dr Michael Bailey [Newcomen North East]
14 October – Title to be confirmed, David Mason [ARCH & ARCH]
15 October – David Dippie Dixon Memorial Lectures: The Roman assault on Burnswark Hill and New Views on Roman Scotland, John Reid [CCA]
25 October – Putting the People in the Pageant: Visions of People’s History and the Industrial Revolution in Historical Pageants in Britain, 1905-2016, Alexander Hutton [SOCANTS]
31 October – The River Tees Rediscovered, Robin Daniels [TAS]

Conference review: SGRP at Carlisle
Our region has played host to a number of national conferences this year which we hope to report to all members. Paul Bidwell, formerly Head of Archaeology, Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums, who retired in 2013, has provided this review of one of those events.

Paul writes “The Study Group for Roman Pottery (SGRP) was established in 1971 and now has a membership of 170 which consists mainly of people working for archaeological contracting organisations and museums, together with a healthy representation of independent researchers. This year its annual conference met at the Tullie House Museum in Carlisle on the weekend of 14–17 July.

Although there was a wide range of papers, the focus was on recent fieldwork and research in northern England. Pottery and burial practices in the Roman cemetery recently investigated at Botchergate, Carlisle were described by Megan Stoakley. Presentations on the material from the excavations in the extra-mural settlements at Brougham were given by Ruth Leary and Gwladys Monteil. One particularly interesting aspect of the pottery at Maryport is the presence of coarse wares imported from Mucking on the Thames estuary in Essex. It is a demonstration of the extent to which Roman military and urban sites in northern England had become dependent on the import of pottery from the Midlands and southern England in the mid-Roman period. Some of the implications of this change from local production in the earlier Roman period were explored by Jerry Evans in his account of pottery from recent excavations at Vindolanda. In the third century imports from continental Europe were in decline but were still of some importance. Most of the wine supplied to the Roman army in the North seems to have been supplied from southern Gaul and the Rhineland in barrels rather than amphorae, but, as Paul Bidwell explained, during the mid- to late third century imports from the famous wine-producing area of Campania in central Italy arrived in large quantities. They were contained in amphorae of distinctive forms and fabrics (see the photographs below).

Two mid-third century wine amphorae from Campania found at South Shields and Wallsend
(© Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums)

The Pottery Group meetings always include a short field trip, and this year an excursion was made to Vindolanda and the stretch of the Wall between Gilsland and Birdoswald. A highlight was the firing of a replica Roman pottery kiln at Vindolanda which was organised by Graham Taylor, a professional potter.

Other very interesting contributions dealt with pottery beyond our region, but mention made of some that described work at Scotch Corner and Catterick on the border with North Yorkshire. Excavations connected with the completion of the A1(M) have been on a huge scale and are likely to transform our understanding of Roman settlement in north-east England when the post-excavation analyses have been completed”.

Looking further ahead
Here is a selection of some of the other events happening in October and November across the CBA North region. If you want to get involved with these, with the exception of the open day next weekend, then you will need to book up. Contact details can be found in each of the posters.

For those that haven’t satisfied their fieldwork needs during the summer yet, Wardell Armstrong have sent us details of a further project examining whether a series of large stones in the Wear are the remains of a Roman structure.

Looking further ahead the Arbeia Society conference in November continues the Roman interests

T’s and U’s for the archaeological alphabet

CBA North News
Our alphabet of archaeology continues with a quick pair of Updates from TillVAS and CITiZAN with news; there are also events listed for this weekend… but we aren’t going to cheat and claim the W just yet!

Our Events page on the website will continue to grow and further events that have come to us from one of our group members to us will be added soon to the page. We’ll gather these up for 2018 (please send us notice of any that you think might of interest to everyone else) and send on all the events that we know of at the start of the year for what is, traditionally, the most widely read and circulated of all our emails.

We hope to send out more news later this week with October’s many events listed.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
26.09.2017

Local group round-up: TillVAS in north Northumberland
Maureen Charlton and Heather Pentland send us another group round-up from the Till Valley Archaeological Society. Excavations have only recently finished at this site, so this – outside of the local parish magazine – is the first news of this excavation outside the area.

They also note the next TillVAS event – to which all are invited – is not long away either.

Events this weekend
This weekend is full of archaeological events – we know of at least six. Here are posters for three.

…and finally, though you’ll have to be quick to book a place for this dayschool.

CITiZAN in CBA North-land during 2017
Megan Clement of the Coastal and Intertidal Zone Archaeological Network (CITiZAN) has sent us a brief note of their work this summer as we covered last year. This year the project’s efforts have concentrated, so far, upon Cumbria. She writes;

“Two events were hosted in Cumbria during the Festival of British Archaeology on the 16th and 17th July, led by CITiZAN North in partnership with Morecambe Bay Partnership. These were CITiZAN app workshops which involved a basic guided walk around a local area whilst updating and adding new records to the CITiZAN dataset. The two sites chosen were Roa Island near Barrow-in-Furness and Bardsea near Ulverston. Several new sites were recording including Rampside Navigation Light, a number of shipwrecks at Roa and anti-tank and anti-glider defences were recorded at Bardsea. In all 10 people attended across the two events and were trained in recording the app and identifying archaeology on the coast and in the intertidal zone.

If you are interested in reading more about the workshop at Roa Island, there is a blog which can be found here. We will be returning to Roa Island in November 2017 as some significant new features were identified and need to have a more in-depth survey carried out.”


A volunteer recording a shipwreck at Roa Island causeway (© CITiZAN)

Megan also writes that there are further training events to come if you are interested;

“There is one in Tyneside and one in Cumbria coming up in October. These are:

1. App Workshop and Guided Walk: North Shields
Friday 6th October at 2.00pm – 4.30pm
Venue Old Low Light Heritage Centre

Come join CITiZAN at the Old Low Light Heritage Centre, in North Shields (Fish Quay NE30 1JA) for an app workshop in how to rapidly record at risk archaeology on the coast. Join us for a short talk and tutorial on the app, a leisurely walk down the north bank of the Tyne recording archaeology. The event is free but places have to be booked here.

2. Training event: Roa Island
Friday 13th and Saturday 14th October 10.00am-4.00pm
Venue to be confirmed but near Roa Island

Join CITiZAN North and Morecambe Bay Partnership at Roa Island, near Barrow-in-Furness to make a permanent archaeological record the remains of a jetty and slipway identified during a workshop in July. These features appear to be part of the former slipway to access Piel Island and part of Piel pier used for travel to Belfast and Douglas. The event is free but places have to be booked for this also.”