Tag Archives: Civil War

CBA North: March News

CBA North News

Dear Members and Friends of CBA North,

This issue’s theme seems to be numbers as you will see for various reasons.

The first two months of the year, even with an extra day last month to play, enjoy and work with, have now gone. There are a number of additions to our previous events listings from three of our group members the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland – the ‘Arch & Arch’, Coquetdale Community Archaeology and the Teesside Archaeological Society. (Other group’s events from outside the CBA North network have also been included). All are now in the revised Events page of our website if they are regular happenings.

March’s events start soon – and hopefully third time lucky for the appearance of Tony Wilmott at the BAS meeting this evening – with Whitby Abbey: 30 years of new research. This event was listed at the start of the year, as it has been previously but those of you in the north of the region will know why the hope as well!

However a pair of articles also review meetings previously announced in the CBA North emails to you last year. This come from Elsa Price, of Tullie House Museum in Carlisle, and Kate Sharpe whose conference we gave a grant to support last year and Maureen Norrie, the Editor of the Teesside Archaeological Society (TAS), who describes the Elgee Memorial Lecture at Middlesbrough. Kira-May Charley who many of you will know already for TAS now become Deputy Chair of the group and represents the group at CBA North Committee as part of the local-regional network also being involved in making this happen.

As part of regional-national network, CBA North is one of a number of CBA regional groups. Indeed we were originally numbered (rather than named) regions across the country. Some of you may remember us as CBA Group 3. Claire Corkill and James Rose, both of CBA National, have written to update of what coming out the 2018 survey and workshops held during March 2019 as well as the preliminary findings from the survey we carried in our last issue – wherein plenty number-crunching has been carried out.

The annual Durham Archaeology Day is close at hand, and details of that day are below. As last year CBA North will have a stall there with Committee members present, so please come along, say “Hello!” and give us your views and feedback on how we are doing for you. (We might even have some bargain books for you for sale there).

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
01.03.2020

2020 Local Society and Group Events – further additions
Some 11 further events have been added since our last email to you in our list of local society and group events, which in turn added to the start of the year listing. These come from a number of sources, including groups inside and outside of the CBA North network.

There are now something like 90 events for 2020 listed. Please continue to let us know any additions and/or alterations for the Events as well as any changes in the details for the Local societies and groups page.

Whilst not all the titles and speakers have been confirmed in these new additions, some have dates that have been confirmed, so put them into your diary now. Here is another consolidated block of those ‘new’ dates, organised by date, which you can also print and ‘patch’ over your earlier printouts.

2 March – Prehistoric Sites nearby Duddo Stones and Roughting Linn, Allan Colman [Bowsden Heritage Group]
14 March – CAREing for rock art in the UK and Ireland, Myra Gisen [ARCH & ARCH]
8 April – AGM and Recent developments in Iron Age archaeology in the North-East, Richard Carlton [TILLVAS]
18 July – Festival of Archaeology lecture: St Godric and Finchale Priory, Margaret Coombes [ARCH & ARCH]
17 September – title to be confirmed on the north east lead industry, Greg Finch [CCA]
26 September – title to be confirmed, Paul Brown [ARCH & ARCH]
29 September – Deceptively Spacious: Durham Castle and the walls survey, Richard Annis [TAS]
10 October – Heritage is more precious than oil: teaching pupils about the past in Jordan, Arwa Badan [ARCH & ARCH]
14 November – Fire, War and Flood: Destruction and Reconstruction of World Heritage Sites, Christopher Doppelhoffer [ARCH & ARCH]
27 October – title and speaker to be confirmed [TAS]
24 November – title and speaker to be confirmed [TAS]

A Note on Further Numbers
Since the start of the year our CBA North numbers of members have continued to grow; some five new members have joined us. Welcome to them one and all of them! At the start of the year the views of our website looked like;

It is therefore pleasing to see that our January and February emails have been well received and that website numbers continue at the same sort of level;

It is with your support that CBA North thrives and is able to support such conferences, and work within the CBA family, as that described below. This is much appreciated by Committee and gives us a purpose for the future.

Can March’s figure be better again? That is also up to you as members, particularly our group members, to help spread the word as we spread your news to everyone else. Already the next email to you is under construction (but whether we send that later this month or the start of April has yet to be decided), so please feel free to send on any news in the meantime.

Northern Prehistory: Connected Communities: a Tullie House conference reviewed
Elsa Price and Kate Sharpe, instigators and co-organisers of the Northern Prehistory conference have given us a review of their wide-ranging conference. CBA North Committee was very pleased to be able to support this conference looking at many different aspects of prehistory of sites, current research on sites and finds, how to research and present it. They write;
 
‘Tullie House’s first in-house conference was held at the museum over the weekend of the 12 and 13 October 2019. This was generously supported with a grant from CBA North and supported with bursaries for students by the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society.


‘As Curator of Human History [Elsa], I teamed up with archaeology researcher, Dr Kate Sharpe from Durham University to try and replicate our own exchange of ideas and perspectives of Cumbrian prehistory on a larger stage. As intended, the conference attracted delegates from across a diverse range of sectors. The 75 attendees represented commercial archaeology units, museums and learning, various heritage sites, academics, students, community archaeology groups and private researchers and amateurs. This bringing together of a wide variety of backgrounds was a key objective of the conference, recognising that multiple organisations, groups and individuals are working in similar areas, yet seldom have the opportunity to share and develop through networking with one another.


A network of museum curators, education officers, CBA North members and others – all conference attendees – listening to interpretation consultant Dot Boughton explain all about the Bewcastle cauldron

‘The keynote presentation was delivered by Professor Richard Bradley of Reading University and the programme included 11 sessions across the weekend including discussions on: what we mean by ‘Northern Prehistory’, material culture, access and engagement, the Langdale axe quarries, and the major site of Stainton West. A conference discussion was led by Paul Frodsham and concluded that there was an active community of people who wanted to do more with both Cumbrian and wider northern prehistory, and are keen to form stronger relationships with other disciplines and organisations. It was also noted that Cumbria should not viewed as “northern” but rather central to the British Isles, and future research work should aim to connect with Yorkshire, southern Scotland and Ireland. Delegates requested that contact details be shared and Tullie House has been compiling a database to help facilitate networking and potentially generate future projects. This contact bank has now been compiled and distributed. Anyone wishes to obtain a copy can do so by emailing me at elsa.price@tulliehouse.org.

A Connected Community of the past; some of Mesolithic Stainton West explained

‘For Tullie House, the permanent Prehistory Gallery had had no major development since its installation in 1991. The recent development of the new displays meant that reconnecting and exploring the findings and ideas from the Cumbrian prehistory community was essential. This ensured that the gallery refresh embraced recent thinking and now better reflects the whole county. The new gallery was part of the focus of this conference, to demonstrate how the results of research and fieldwork can be disseminated to wide audience base. Supporting this central idea were talks from a variety of museum and heritage professionals addressing the challenges of curating prehistory-based school sessions. Papers were presented from Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums (Kathryn Wharton), Leeds Museums and Galleries (Emily Nelson) and Durham University Library and Heritage Collections (Paddy Holland). Alongside this Gabrielle Heffernan, curatorial manager at Tullie House spoke about how best to access and museum’s research collections. Bolstering these talks were practical education-based workshops from Sarah Forster from Tullie House, an optional trip to the prehistoric landscape of Moor Divock led by Emma Watson and a knapping demonstration by James Dilly from Ancient Craft.

Another part of the new displays; with video showing knapping as demonstrated at the conference, original artefacts within the case and handling materials attached to the bench

‘For those working in commercial and academic archaeology the conference provided a valuable opportunity to catch up on work being done across the county, to learn about new approaches and interpretations, and to make both research and business connections in a relaxed environment. The positive messages from national heritage organisations were also well received and will perhaps encourage more fieldwork to investigate the rich array of prehistoric landscapes across the county. The declared intention of Tullie House to foster increased access to collections was also extremely encouraging and will hopefully see both students and more experienced researchers turn their attention to the wealth of Cumbrian artefacts held by the museum.  
 
‘Additional activities included post-conference drinks and a conference dinner. Overall, the conference was extremely well-received with all delegates indicating that they would like to attend similar interdisciplinary events in the future. Feedback also indicated that attendees would have liked more museum gallery time built into the schedule, and that they found the parallel sessions frustrating as they were unable to attend all talks. The closing discussion revealed that almost all audience members would have liked to attend the museum education-based talks, and yet the majority chose the alternative parallel session, perhaps sticking within their own comfort zones. The parallel format was an inevitable compromise used in order to balance the objective of including as many as possible of the wide range of speakers who all submitted high quality papers. Perhaps however, rather than making the sessions thematic in the traditional fashion as we did, we could in future make them truly interdisciplinary. Mixing up sessions might feel a little odd, but our experience suggests that, in terms of improved exchanges between disciplines, the rewards might be significant!’.

Our thanks to Elsa and Kate for this write-up and organising what was a most enjoyable conference – of so many different parts. Of especial note are the follow-up’s to that conference in the networks set up and renewed, they are there to use. (If you have an idea or proposal on what CBA North Committee should give a grant to aid this year, please feel free to get in touch).

The 2019 Elgee Memorial Lecture: Durham and Dunbar
Maureen Norrie, Editor of the Teesside Archaeological Society’s Bulletin, has written to us of another connected community of the past – those soldiers of the Scottish army imprisoned at Durham – and also of a community of the present in how the annual Elgee Memorial Lecture works between a number of local groups. By the kind permission of the Teesside Archaeological Society we reproduce her write-up, which also appears in the current TAS Bulletin, for everyone in the CBA North membership. She writes;

‘This year’s Elgee Memorial Lecture (7 December 2019, Dorman Museum, Middlesbrough) was a ‘flagship’ event for TAS. It was our turn to host it on a once-in-four-years occasion, taking turns to do so with three other local Societies: Cleveland Naturalists Club, Cleveland and Teesside Local History Society, and Cleveland Industrial Archaeology Society. It is co-hosted annually by the Dorman Museum in honour of Frank Elgee (1881-1972) ‘archaeologist, geologist and naturalist, who is probably the best-known Curator of the Dorman Museum and [who] made a lifelong study of the North Yorkshire Moors, including its archaeology’ (Phil Philo, TAS Bulletin 2017, p.22).
 
That’ll be one of them Scottish soldiers, then’. In his talk on ‘Durham and Dunbar, Scottish soldiers at Palace Green’, Richard Annis (Archaeological Services, Durham University) described the unexpected discovery in 2013 of two (partial) mass graves in an overgrown, enclosed, yard on the western side of Palace Green, Durham, during preliminary works for the construction of a Café at Palace Green Library. The bones did indeed prove to be (as a digger-operator predicted) Scottish soldiers: prisoners-of-war from the Battle of Dunbar, 3 September 1650, who survived an eight-day forced march from the battle-site to Durham, only to die in Durham of (mostly) dysentery.


Elgee Memorial Lecture, Dorman Museum 2019. Centre Richard Annis (speaker), Freya Horsfield and Kira-May Charley (Chair and Deputy Chair respectively of TAS, either side of Richard)

‘The talk included not only the dead soldiers, and what forensic investigations could reveal about their lives; but also what could be learned about their surviving comrades, some of whom were transported to America and, after a period of indentured labour, remained there. Full details are included in ‘Lost Lives, New Voices: unlocking the stories of the Scottish soldiers from the Battle of Dunbar 1650’, co-authored by C Gerrard, P Graves, A Millard, R Annis, and A Caffell.

‘The bones were reburied in Elvet Hill Road Cemetery, Durham City, in May 2018, and a permanent headstone installed. There are also plaques to their memory in the site where the bones were discovered; and in Durham Cathedral (their former prison) alongside the altar to Queen Margaret of Scotland, in the Chapel of the Nine Altars’.

The Elgee Memorial Lecture as Maureen indicated also a connected community of groups interested in the varied interests of Frank Elgee. A list of all the previous Elgee Lectures, together with the host organisation, can be found on the TAS website here. Can you fill in the blanks for the missing lectures? Were you there? We are sure that TAS and their partners would welcome that information.

CBA National news;
1) The Birmingham National-Regional CBA Groups meeting

Claire Corkill, Development Manager, has written of what is underway between CBA National and the other Regional CBA Groups. These notes show how your responses from the December 2018 survey and March 2019 are being taken on to help shape both North and National direction for a better future.


Claire writes;
‘CBA North is part of a network of regional groups across England and Wales all working with the shared goal of ‘Archaeology for All’ and helping to create opportunities for more people to get involved with archaeology. Representatives from the CBA and the CBA regional groups met in Birmingham in January to discuss opportunities to work together more closely in the future.

‘Part of the inspiration for this meeting were the outcomes of the CBA’s audience development survey funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund (NLHF) and undertaken by Tricolor 2018-2019. Many thanks to those of you who completed the survey or participated in one of the associated workshops. The survey highlighted the value of the regional groups, and January’s meeting was the first in a number of conversations that aim to develop the relationships between the regional groups and look at ways to improve communications and share ideas and information. Our next meeting of the CBA regional groups is already planned for a Saturday in June.

‘The CBA are currently preparing a further bid to the NLHF and regional group representatives had the opportunity to share their thoughts on elements, such as a possible new CBA website, digital assets and skills development. The development of this work in conjunction with the regional groups will help enable the CBA to provide more beneficial support, creating new opportunities to work together in the future, helping the groups to become more resilient and create more opportunities for members to get involved with archaeology’.

A CBA North’s comment on Claire’s notes is below; 
 
‘We cannot say if many CBA North members took part in the online survey, only you can know if you or group did, however a goodly number did – but we thank you nonetheless. We were especially pleased to act as host for one of the only three on-the-ground workshops in Newcastle last year, and thank those members and friends who attended that event.

‘It is pleasing to see that work from the survey and workshops is being taken on board by CBA National. Many of you have felt that there has not enough prominence and support of the local-regional-national family in evidence over recent years. However, to our mind this work is actively reinvigorating all parts of the family. Your views so far have been carried into the report of the survey, as well as in our representation at Birmingham, and at other meetings, for you. Already the next CBA regional groups meeting is in our diary for June. Your views, comments and feedback are most welcome at any time, useful to us and where possible enacted upon …but we do need them in the first instance.

‘We are looking at a possible April event primarily for our local group members within the CBA North network (perhaps for those groups who are not yet members as well?). This may be on who, how and what and we are currently doing – and importantly what you/they would like to do in the future. We approach the end of our own current five year plan and this, combined with the revitalisation of CBA National, gives a chance to look ahead, perhaps a bit more definitely within that CBA family of local-regional-national groups’.

2) CBA National’s Communication and Participation in Archaeology Survey: some initial results and a thank you!
In our last email to you we also carried the links to a current CBA National survey as pictured below. Thank you to all of those that on contributed to that survey. This very much follows on from the Birmingham meeting described above by Claire.

James Rose, who you will remember is CBA National’s Communications and Marketing Manager, writes of the survey results;

‘The CBA recently ran a survey on communication and participation in archaeology. The aim was to gather evidence that demonstrated whether there was public demand for some of the changes and improvements the CBA would like to make to their website in support of an application to the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

‘Firstly a huge thank you to those that contributed. The response was fantastic! Almost 800 people completed the survey from a cross-section of people with all levels of interest in archaeology. They results show that people are keen for more news and content, information about careers and learning and, crucially, more ways to participate. CBA regional groups are vital to providing those opportunities. These results show what valuable work they do and how much potential there is to grow with local group and individual members. You can view the initial findings on the CBA blog here. A short video lasting a minute has also been prepared giving many of the responses to the survey, many showing the value of archaeology in other ways. This can be found as this YouTube video.

‘If you have any more comments or suggestions, please do get in touch through the links here for CBA National or CBA North‘.

County Durham Archaeology Day: Saturday 21 March 2020
Tracey Donnelly, of the Archaeology Team, Durham County Council, has sent us details of this year’s County Durham Archaeology Day. This year it is slightly later than normal, but nonetheless if you’re interested in archaeology come along and find out more. This year’s fascinating talks will be:

– New Investigations at the East Park Roman Settlement, Sedgefield. Josh Hogue, DigVentures
– Excavation at Binchester Roman Fort 2019. Steve Collison, Northern Archaeological Associates
– The First Ever Excavations at Middleham Castle, Bishop Middleham. Josh Hogue, DigVentures
– Excavations at Walworth Deserted Medieval Village. Richard Carlton, The Archaeological Practice
– Investigations on the North Terrace of Auckland Castle 2019. Jamie Armstrong, Archaeological Services Durham University
– The Discovery of Bek’s Chapel at Auckland Castle. John Castling, The Auckland Project
– The Portable Antiquities Scheme 2019. Benjamin Westwood, Finds Liaison Officer Durham and Tees

The essential details are;

Location: Council Chamber, County Hall, (there is ample free parking at County Hall, and County Hall is well served with public transport. Durham City Park and Ride Scheme buses also stop at County Hall).
Time: 9:50am – 4:00pm. Doors Open at 9:15 AM
Cost: £18.00 which includes buffet lunch, teas & coffees; £14.00 for full-time students, please let us know if you have any dietary requirements, or require a vegetarian lunch.

Tickets sell out very quickly so book early to avoid disappointment.

To book and pay for a place online follow https://doitonline.durham.gov.uk/ and click on ‘More Services’ and select ‘Archaeology Day – Order Tickets’ or contact 03000 260000 if you wish to book and pay over the phone. Please note that requests for tickets to be sent out in the post will incur a £1 postage and packing fee.

There will be displays by local societies and archaeological contractors as well as bookstalls in the adjacent Durham Room. As noted CBA North will be there with a stall, we as CBA North might even have some bargain books for sale there. We cannot promise that they will be those below, but there might be.

CBA North: mid-June newsletter

CBA North News

Our email to you this time is another mixture of content – from a number of sources also – and from around the CBA North region.

Following our usual events listing for the remains of June, we’ve a contribution from a member on how archaeology has inspired their artistic work and studies, something looking ahead to a conference in October (not that we are wishing summer away already), notes on recent publications, posters for events (including one happening on Saturday) and throughout the summer, as well as a book sale. There is so much yet to come in the intervening months, such as July’s Festival of Archaeology no less!

As ever we continue to keep our Events website page up-to-date with details – three further talks have been added, as well as the title of another now confirmed, on that page since our last email to you. Please let us know any additions or alterations to that page or indeed the listing below.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
19.06.2019

June and July Events 2019
June 2019
3 June – Gods and heroes: public and private in Pompeian houses, Dr Thea Ravesi [BAS]
5 June – Riding West: Roman Cavalry Tombstones at Hexham & Beyond, Lindsay Allason-Jones [TILLVAS]
25 June – The Yarm Helmet, Chris Caple [TAS]
26 June – Paints and Pigments in the Past: colouring in the Roman Frontiers, Louisa Campbell [SOCANTS]

July 2019
13 July – Work in Thebes, Jose Manuel Galan [NEAES]
20 July – The Archaeology of Domestic Innovation in the Country House, Prof Marilyn Palmer [ARCH & ARCH]
31 July – From Women’s Rights to Human Rights: How the Struggle for the Vote Changed the World, Rosie Serdiville [SOCANTS]

Archaeology, Pots and back again (twice): a member explains all
Lorraine Clay, both a member of Tynedale Archaeology and CBA North groups, as well as potter has sent us this short article on how archaeology inspires her artistic work. She writes;

‘I’m a ceramic artist who draws inspiration from archaeology, this is ponderings on archaeology and pottery.

I’ve always been interested in Archaeology since Dad took us to The Wall when children and finding rock art with Mum as a teenager. When I studied A Level Archaeology in 1990 for something to do after work, I couldn’t have imagined the path that it would take. The A Level was so disorganised that I swore I would never do another qualification and looked for a leisure evening class: woodwork was daytime so I plumped for pottery.

One of my first pieces was directly inspired by Scottish Celtic crosses, then direct influences came from visiting Minoan sites in Greece: these included the 6’ tall storage jars in Malia with coils as thick as an arm, and the curious kernos vessels in Heraklion Museum. You can learn a lot from copying something – such as the challenges the potter faced – one Greek pot I was having trouble with the handles, I put my mind in the place of a hot tired potter who wanted to drink Raki in the shade, and there it was! The simplest and quickest method looked just right.

A Cretan Krater

As I approached 13 years with the Civil Service I took the plunge to devote myself to becoming a full-time potter. I began studies at Newcastle College and for four years sold work in galleries and exhibitions and ran evening classes. In 2006 I commenced the Contemporary Ceramics degree at Newcastle and was accepted to be the pottery tutor for Ashmore House, an NHS mental health daycentre. Newcastle gave me the impetus to be more experimental and I began weathering clay, a technique I still practice today.

Weathering is inspired by mortality: a fingerprint survives on a Minoan storage jar, a Neolithic vessel is patterned with nail impressions but the potter is long gone. A cat’s paw-print on a Roman roof tile…

Like ceramics we believe we are immortal, living for tomorrow we stay in unsatisfying jobs until walking home in a gale a dislodged gargoyle takes us out. (I heard this story many years ago on the radio of a man dying this way after gales in Scotland; googling it now I find a US woman died in 2014 from a falling gargoyle – maybe it’s not rare at all!).

We are more like unfired clay, endangered by random circumstances, wind and rain.  I think this is why I joined Altogether Archaeology: too many years had gone by without digging, I couldn’t resist any more: my knees were in remission. On my first molehill survey I found a jet bead and was hooked again. And it seemed natural to get permission to take a little of the clay we dug up home!

Lorraine at the Whitley Castle mole-hill survey

In 2016 I took a chance and applied to the Ness of Brodgar and was euphoric when I was accepted!

Weathered bowl before firing (above), weathering and wood-fired (below left and right respectively)

Sometimes I use archive materials and clay from archaeological sites. For an exhibition at the Durham Oriental Museum I morphed cuneiform envelopes into curvaceous “promise boxes” using Forest Hall clay following their ancient Middle East counterparts.

For a second exhibition I was delighted with a label just bearing the name Petrie on one vase: I made pieces celebrating the people, including Flinders Petrie, in the chain that had brought the artefact to Durham using clay from digs. William Thacker, who set up the Oriental Museum, is shown by the transfer print which on smoke-fired Low Hauxley clay.


When the daycentre closed it didn’t take long to become bored. I heard you didn’t need an archaeology degree to do an Archaeology postgraduate course, so I contacted Antonia Thomas at UHI (University of the Highlands and Islands), who told me she was starting an Art and Archaeology module the following week!

3 Orkney clays: Back row – unfired with shell: unfired without shell
Front row – fired with shell: unfired without shell.

I enjoyed it so much I applied to UHI and Durham to do an MA in Archaeology, focusing especially on the British Neolithic. Deciding between the two was one of the toughest decisions I’ve had to make! Two terms in and I find myself writing about ceramics not rock art – in Dolni Vestonice, Gravettian finger fluting, materials analysis: before I knew it, I was suggesting Clay in the Palaeolithic for my dissertation! Watch this space!…….’ 

[Many thanks to Lorraine for writing this article; if this has inspired you or you want to share your own archaeological inspiration, perhaps in different ways, please feel free to send us a short article to us at cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org for our next issue].

Tullie House Conference
Elsa Price of Tullie House Museum, Carlisle, and Kate Sharpe of Durham University have sent us the poster below on a busy October weekend they are planning on the prehistory of the Cumbrian area. If you are interested in the day, read on and follow up through the contact details given – contributions from all are most welcome!

(Fairly recent) Tees Archaeology publications
From recent the River Tees Rediscovered Landscape Partnership, Tees Archaeology have fairly recently published a pair of short booklets The First Great Civil War in the Tees Valley and Industry in the Tees Valley. These short well-illustrated freely-available booklets give introductions to the many sites of particular note for their respective subjects.


Whilst many other Civil War battlefields and sieges are known across CBA North’s region, the first of these highlights many of the smaller skirmishes that rarely figure in the national literature. This booklet was written by Robin Daniels and Phil Philo. A further leaflet for the Piercebridge encounter described is also available further down the website page mentioned below.

Industry upon Teesside, however, needs no introduction. However sites familiar and unfamiliar are dealt with in the booklet by Alan Betteney, for the whole variety of Teesside industries, though this is a rather larger file to download. Nevertheless both of these are freely available as downloads from the Tees Archaeology website Downloads page.

TillVAS’ Iron Age Day
Equally industriously in the north of Northumberland, this Saturday sees the Till Valley Archaeology Society hold an Iron Age Day. The poster below gives details of what you can expect, inside and out, at Etal Village Hall to give more of a background and context to their recent excavations at nearby Mardon Farm.

CBA National’s June Booksale
CBA North members might be interested to know that CBA National is having a Spring Sale on publications. They have reduced prices on more than 75 books including many of our recent Research Reports and Practical Handbooks. Their online shop can be visited here. The sale ends on 30 June 2019 so ideal for finding some holiday reading and/or post-exam relaxation.

Prehistoric Pioneers: an Exhibition and Events
Charley Robson, of Durham University’s Prehistoric Pioneers Education and Outreach Team, has written to let us know of this exhibition. She writes;

‘The Prehistoric Pioneers exhibition is now open to the public at the Durham Museum of Archaeology, Palace Green, Durham, until 24 November 2019. The exhibition explores life in ancient Britain, from warfare to rituals, and the way Bronze Age people buried weapons and treasure in hidden hoards. Curated by the Durham’s MA Museum and Artefact Studies students, this exhibition gives a face to prehistoric people and challenges the idea that these were primitive cultures. 
 
To coincide with the exhibition, a pair of talks have been planned to take place on the 20 and 24 June and which are detailed in the poster below. Some more details on these events are given below for those who might be interested to attend. Booking information is given through the poster and places can be booked in emailing archaeology.museum@durham.ac.uk. Further information on the exhibition, including that available who cannot get to Durham themselves, as a series of podcasts is available here‘.

On Salt and Scottish soldiers: a pair of lectures this week

CBA North News
Today’s email title sounds like the cabbages and kings of the walrus in Lewis Carroll’s The Jabberwocky, but it is so this week. There are a pair of two lectures that we know about this week – both at the northern edge of our CBA North region. But both have stories to tell beyond their immediate area and internationally so.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 05.06.2017

Salt
The next lecture of the Border Archaeological Society lecture is tonight at 7.30pm at Berwick Parish Church Hall, Berwick, on The Needles Eye Enclosure: salt production in the Late Iron Age by Jenny Proctor. This important site was partly excavated to reveal an extensive, and well dated, settlement dating from the late 4th century BC to the Romano-British period.

The arch of Needles Eye north of Berwick
Photo © Phil Catterall (cc-by-sa/2.0)

The site takes its name from the Needles Eye rock arch in the cliffs shown above. The excavation of this site currently provides the most northerly evidence of salt production in prehistoric Britain, but more regional links with the Cheviots are also hinted at. All will be explained tonight.

Scottish Soldiers
Also this week is the next lecture of the Till Valley Archaeological Society which is also at 7.30pm at Crookham Village Hall, though this is on the Wednesday night.

This talk will also highlight further national – and indeed international – links of events that happened in our local area. We’ve covered earlier some of the earlier events on these soldiers at Durham. Further information on this project, and the range of work carried out, can now also be found here.

Details for both groups can be found through the Local Societies and Groups page of our website.