Tag Archives: CBA North

CBA North: End of August/Start of September news

CBA North News
This issue of CBA North news has been slightly delayed. However, we hope that you find it worth the wait. We have a report of the recent Hadrian’s Wall Pilgrimage, which happens only one every 10 years, and a round-up of recent years by one of our local group members.

In addition the usual listing of events to come with the change in month soon – the sharp-eyed will notice changes to this and our Events website page as we are told of those changes for September and other months, we also have a further article on archaeological creativity and notice of an event from our sister organisation CBA North West.

We hope you that you enjoy and that you might contribute something, perhaps of your own local group’s activities this summer?, that you think that others might enjoy or should know of for our next issue.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee,
25.08.2019

Remaining August 2019 Events
28 August – The Past Beneath the Lawns; current excavations at Auckland Castle, John Castling and Chris Gerrard [SOCANTS]

September 2019 Events
2 September – Whitby Abbey, Tony Wilmott [BAS]
4 September – The Bowl Hole Cemetery at Bamburgh, Graeme Young [TILLVAS]
14 September – Mapping the Khandaq Shapur: One of the Great Barriers of the Ancient World [ARCH & ARCH]
24 September – title to be announced, Dr Ben Roberts [TAS]
25 September – (Re)Discovering Ava: the Achavanich Beaker Burial project, Maya Hoole [SOCANTS]

The 2019 Hadrian’s Wall Pilgrimage – done with stile!
It was rather unkindly and harshly said that we know all we need to of Hadrian’s Wall sometime ago. However excavations, surveys and other researches have continued on and at a pace. Sometimes a stock-take is useful and the Hadrian’s Wall Pilgrimage is one such opportunity. We asked Bill Griffiths to explain all on the pilgrimage, and you will see why there isn’t a typo in the article title. He writes;

‘The first pilgrimage of Hadrian’s Wall took place in 1849, attended by 24 people under the direction of the Reverend Collingwood Bruce. The second pilgrimage occurred in 1886 when it began a decennial tradition. Since 1949 it has taken place in the last year of the decade.

The 14th Pilgrimage took place over 20th to 28th July 2019 and saw 218 Pilgrims, in four coaches, traverse the wall over eight days, looking in particular at some of the new discoveries and research questions of the last 10 years. The Pilgrims came from across the UK and Europe and as far afield as the USA and China.


The 2019 Pilgrims following a lunchtime reception at South Shields Town Hall, who displayed the flags of the majority of nations represented on the Pilgrimage.

Each coach had a pair of guides, each an acknowledged expert on the Wall. Pilgrims were encouraged to change coach each day to get different perspectives from different guides.


Nick Hodgson, President of the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle and one of the coach guides, explaining the fort at Chesters.

Organised by the two learned societies of Hadrian’s Wall, the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne and the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society, the Pilgrimage is five years in the planning. The committee, led by the Chief Pilgrim David Breeze, pores over every detail, from the hotels, to the menus for receptions, to considering whether we will need additional portaloos at key sites.

In the midst of this a handbook has been created for the Pilgrimage, with contributions from experts along the length of the Wall setting out the new advances of the last decade. It has been complied by Dr Rob Collins of Newcastle University and Dr Matt Symonds, editor of Current World Archaeology. Such a volume has been produced for the last three Pilgrimages, beginning with the volume produced in 1999 under Paul Bidwell, and each marks a significant contribution to Hadrian’s Wall studies in its own right. Copies are available from either of the Societies, and can also be found at several of the museum shops along the Wall.


The ‘twin’ compliers of the Pilgrimage handbook Matt and Rob.

The week included on site tours, receptions and walks along sections of the Wall. Much thought goes in to attempting to keep the Pilgrims safe. This year the Pilgrims were granted access to walk a section of the vallum, not usually accessible to the public, between Carrawburgh Roman Fort and Limestone Corner. However, this necessitated getting the Pilgrims across the Military Road at a very fast section of the road. The steering group thought hard about this, with Graeme Stobbs, our lead for Health and Safety, providing the solution. He designed a wooden stile for the event, to get Pilgrims over the field wall opposite Limestone Corner and the two of us, resplendent in hi viz jackets, marshalled the pilgrims to cross the road, with Graeme deploying a green or red flag according to whether the road was clear enough for us to release Pilgrims across it. Anyone who has led a tour knows how hard it is to marshal people to cross roads safely. However, the theatre of the flags worked well, with only a recalcitrant few daring to try and cross under their own initiative! At the end of the day they were all brought across alive – job done.


The Pilgrimage stile, with Graeme Stobbs poised and ready to prevent the Pilgrims throwing themselves in front of cars!

The Pilgrimage is a unique event in every way, not least for the melting pot of people who constitute the Pilgrims, who range from dedicated Wall specialists to curious members of the public who have not visited the frontier before. The discussions held over the week are truly stimulating for all concerned.

So – here’s to the next one in 2029, planning will start in 2024 (gulp!)’.

Bill Griffiths – Pilgrimage Secretary

The Northern Archaeology Group grasps volunteering opportunities
It is a while since we’ve had a local group round-up and heard something from our group member the Northern Archaeology Group, so we asked Phil Carter to review what the group has been up to lately. Here Phil notes how a small group, with its own small projects, has also been engaged with a number of larger ones again. He writes;

‘In addition to our own on-going Roman roads research & fieldwork, and of course our two divers investigating the river crossings and associated votive deposits at Piercebridge, the Northern Archaeology Group also has members who have regularly volunteered on the long-running and prestigious excavations at Vindolanda and Binchester Roman fort sites. They have continued to do that, but with the advent of NLHF funded local community archaeology projects along came the opportunity to look at other, new, initiatives to broaden our field-based experience. Thinking how good that had proved, I thought it might be of interest to CBA North readers to see the extent volunteers from a local group can contribute to archaeological investigations here in the North East of England whilst we aren’t formal group partners in such projects. I have chosen a selection of the community archaeology projects we have worked on in recent years to give you a flavour of what’s out there and what can be achieved.

A few years back a hardy core of us worked on the 3-year Hadrian’s WallQuest community project run by Tyne and Wear Archaeology and Museums. On that we were fortunate enough to excavate on such key sites as the Roman Military Way, vallum & vicus at Benwell, the north defensive ditch of the Wall at Albemarle Barracks and the fort ditch/vicus at Arbeia. We then turned our attention to Wallsend to locate, dig and expose the actual bathhouse remains at Segedunum. And as a final hurrah it was particularly gratifying to re-dig a section of the nearby Wall. It’s fair to say that was a fantastic project to be involved in.

Hadrian’s WallQuest: the (actual) bathhouse remains we helped find at Wallsend.

Following on from that a few of us signed-up to work with the Auckland Castle Trust (now The Auckland Project) community project where with Archaeological Services Durham University (ASDU) we investigated the 18th century walled garden prior to its planned redevelopment. We revealed remains of the early dated pinery & vinery complex created by the Bishops of Durham. It was very different and very interesting. Next we were back at Auckland Castle with a call to excavate an area adjacent to the Scotland Wing in advance of groundworks. ASDU were again the on-site team and supervised the volunteers. We were astonished to find a well-preserved section of the early medieval curtain wall, associated buildings, fine carved window tracery and a Tudor-era kitchen range with three intact hearths. We have since investigated important early chapel remains and more of the curtain wall & service buildings. It’s fair to say we weren’t expecting all of that at all! And continuing work with that Project, this time overseen by Northern Archaeological Associates, we are currently helping to excavate the northeast gate area of Binchester Roman fort, investigating both the early fort rampart there & later fort roadway.


Auckland Castle : a surviving section of the Medieval curtain-wall being revealed.

Closer to home (we are based near Chester-le-Street) something very close to our heart was the Sunderland’s Forgotten Stones community project. The Northern Archaeology Group has long sought to discover Roman Sunderland and we have investigated various sites and evidence for that presence, particularly at Hylton where the Group strongly believe there was some sort of Roman bridge structure in the River Wear. Back in 1999 we published a small booklet and a CD outlining our case and always wanted to undertake some trial trenches there but the opportunity never presented itself. So, it was terrific to learn that Castletown Neighbourhood Action Group was seeking assistance from the then HLF to explore just that. They wanted to investigate the site of where many large ‘briggstones’ were removed from the river bed at Hylton in the 1860s and shipped down to the mouth of the river where a good number can still be seen. Knowing of our keen interest in all this they sought our support from the outset. The project secured the services of Wardell Armstrong to oversee the archaeological investigations. The volunteer workforce did a dig on the river foreshore at South Hylton. This proved challenging as we could only dig at low tide.  We cleaned off a spread of large worked stone blocks & wood, and then put a section through to help establish its construction.  Wardell’s view was that without any material dating evidence, and with a similar build style to a lot of the river quayside, it was probably of 17th or 18th century construction. Later local diver Gary Bankhead was in the water to video some very large worked stone blocks underwater on the river bed close to the opposite bank. They need investigating more. A couple of months later we then moved over to North Hylton to investigate a large parch mark in a pasture field. Excavation found ditches and wall foundations related to a post-medieval farm house. Nothing Roman came to light.


Sunderland’s Forgotten Stones: working on the river foreshore at South Hylton.

Travelling to the south of the region some of us volunteered to help out on the River Tees Re-discovered community archaeology project at two locations. Tees Archaeology were running a dig at Piercebridge village to explore features shown up on a geophysical survey northwest of the roman fort. A number of trenches were opened and investigations concluded they were probably Roman-era trackways. Dalton-on-Tees was the next target, to investigate an extensive earthwork feature that came to light on a Lidar survey. In two trenches the associated ditches of the earthwork were revealed, one having a single piece of Roman mortaria. In a third trench well preserved wall foundations of a Medieval house with evidence of occupation was found sitting on the earthwork mound.


River Tees Rediscovered: wall foundations of a Medieval house come to light.

To summarise; you can see we have been very fortunate to volunteer on a wide range of projects covering different localities and different eras. We have forged valuable relationships with the project leads, the contractor archaeology teams and other volunteer groups. If you want to dig there’s lots out there to get involved in, and CBA North is a great source of information. Local groups and societies don’t have to have their own projects at all’.

Phil Carter, Secretary, Northern Archaeology Group.

Creative Archaeological Continued: Art and Archaeology at Aldborough Roman Town
In one of our earlier emails we had one of our own members describe their creativity inspired by archaeology, and in our earlier emails again Dere Street events and projects have been covered. Rose Ferraby and Rob St. John have combined the two in Soundmarks to find overlaps and resonances between art and archaeology at Aldborough. This is something that is geographically ‘just at the end of the road’, but still running till the end of the month. They write;

‘Beneath the quiet streets and farmland of the North Yorkshire village of Aldborough lies the Roman town of Isurium Brigantum. Recent work by the Aldborough Roman Town Project has revealed that it was a town of great importance in the Roman north; a key trading point and busy hub. It was a busy town with a central forum and basilica, large town houses, warehouses and workshops, an amphitheatre and large suburbs.


Rob and Rose at Aldborough Roman Town, North Yorkshire, pictured by Mario Cruzado.

Visiting Aldborough today, this rich history is not always immediately obvious [as above]. This year, a collaboration spanning art, sound and archaeology has explored and documented Aldborough’s hidden sub-surface landscape, leading to an art exhibition and sound installation and a series of public events in August 2019.


Recording at the Roman amphitheatre above Aldborough, pictured by Mario Cruzado.

Soundmarks is a collaboration between us, funded by Arts Council England. An exhibition of our work will be held at The Shed, Aldborough, between Saturday 24th August and Saturday 31st August.

A free ‘art trail’ will be launched alongside the exhibition, allowing the public to navigate eight ‘soundmark’ sites through the village. Each soundmark is located on an important Roman site – such as the Forum, amphitheatre and river – and will be accessed either using a free interactive mobile app, or using a paper map distributed through the village.


Village Green by Rose Ferraby, Soundmarks 2019.

At each soundmark, visitors can view Rose’s visual work and listen to Rob’s sound work, each interpreting the character and history of the site. The soundmark trail – which takes around an hour to walk in full – is designed to encourage people to explore Aldborough’s unique landscape, and to gain new perspectives on its rich Roman history.

At The Shed, visitors can view Rose’s original visual works and listen to an immersive ambient sound piece created by Rob using the sounds of Aldborough, and produced using compositional cues from archaeological techniques, datasets and maps. Two invited guest speakers – Dr. Lesley McFadyen, an archaeologist from Birkbeck, University of London, and Dr. Jos Smith, an environmental landscape writer from the University of East Anglia – will give talks on Saturday 31st August, alongside an artist Q+A. An artist book documenting the Soundmarks collaboration – containing a download of Rob’s sound installation piece – will be available to purchase’.


This exhibition is funded by the Arts Council with support from the Aldborough Roman Town Project, English Heritage and Friends of Roman Aldborough.

Soundmarks runs to till the 31st August, 10 till 5 during the weekends and Monday, 12 till 5 Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, at The Shed, Aldborough Manor, Aldborough, York, YO51 9EP. Further information on Soundmarks can be found online on their website.

For booking a place at the talks and Q&A during this week, and other further September workshops, these are free but you will need to book a place through the Eventbrite website page here.

Excavating the Steam Engine
Our sister organisation CBA North West have arranged a conference in Bolton, Lancashire. John Roberts, CBA North West’s Membership Secretary, writes;

‘I am very pleased to inform you that CBA North West in partnership with the Association for Industrial Archaeology and the Centre for Applied Archaeology, University of Salford will be hosting the 39th North West Industrial Archaeology Conference on Friday September 27th. The conference is being held at Bolton Museum. As this year is the 200th anniversary of the death of James Watt the theme is excavating the steam engine. With excellent speakers and a tour of Bolton Steam Museum in the afternoon it promises to be a splendid day. There are discounts for CBA North West and Association for Industrial Archaeology members. Please note that lunch is not provided. Details, programme and booking information available at the Eventbrite page here‘.

This conference includes a talk on the Reel Fitz Pit Engine, of Little Clifton (between Workington and Cockermouth for those who don’t know) in Cumbria, where a short-lived Newcomen engine was of around 1780. There were many early engines in the West Cumbria coalfield during the 18th century. This one, however, was excavated in the 1970s. CBA North members with industrial archaeological interests are welcome at this event.

In the future
In our next issue of CBA North news we would like to hear more of what you have been doing over the summer that you think deserves wider coverage. We hope that our next email to you won’t be as delayed as this one and will be out early September.

There are a number of Committee places to fill in the forthcoming year. If you or your local group would like to become more involved in CBA North, please send us an email or feel free to talk to one of the existing committee for more details.

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CBA North: July (Festival of Archaeology) special issue

CBA North News
As many of you will know the Festival of Archaeology for this year, till the 28 July, has now started – as has, at times, severe rain showers. Nonetheless across our region are a number of events planned. Indeed one of those events is today. Gillian Waters, the Festival Coordinator at CBA National, explains what is happening nationally below.

This year’s theme is archaeology and technology with some of our own local group members who have organised their own events to coincide with the Festival. Details of those events are given special mention below, but all link into technology – whether of that past or those of the present looking into the past – in some way. Other events, of course, are also happening and Pete Jackson has sent us details of a further event this Saturday. The 2019 Hadrian’s Wall Pilgrimage also starts Saturday, so lots of things happening and across CBA North-land to cater for all tastes.

Best wishes for the summer,

CBA North Committee
17.07.2019

Festival of Archaeology 2019
Gillian, as Festival Coordinator, writes; ‘The Festival of Archaeology is a UK-wide annual two-week event, coordinated by the Council for British Archaeology. It showcases the work of archaeologists and encourages people of all ages and abilities to engage with their own locality and heritage through archaeology. This year’s Festival will take place from 13 to 28 July 2019 and features special events hosted by hundreds of organisations across the UK with hidden sites to explore and new techniques to learn, with talks, tours, workshops, re-enactments, and activities for the archaeologically inclined of all ages.

This year the Council for British Archaeology is also organising on-line festival events – so that no matter where you are you can get involved in the Festival of Archaeology. On 17 July [today!] the CBA partners with the National Trust for #AskanArchaeologist. This live Twitter event gives you the chance to put your question to archaeologists from across the UK. On Youth Takeover Day on 22 July, our band of dedicated volunteers will be masterminding and coordinating the Council for British Archaeology’s social media streams. Volunteers will also be helping behind the scenes on A Day in Archaeology which takes place on the same day. Archaeologists will be showcasing the enormous variety of exciting career and volunteering opportunities that are available, as they post their own blogs and share details of their work.

Find out more details of the Festival on our website https://festival.archaeologyuk.org.

Whatever events you get involved with during the Festival of Archaeology let us know about it via social media with the hashtag #FestivalofArchaeology. You can keep up-to-the-minute with what is happening by keeping an eye to our own social media presences as per below;

Twitter: @archaeologyuk
Facebook: /archaeologyuk
Instagram: @archaeologyuk

To find out more about the work of the Council for British Archaeology visit our website: 
https://new.archaeologyuk.org/. For more information contact the CBA office on 01904 671417 or email festival2019@archaeologyuk.org.

If anyone wants more details that might be unavailable online, please feel free to email Gillian at gillianwaters@archaeologuk.org.

CBA North’s local group members: their own Festival activities
Some of our own local group members are running Festival activities this year across the region. These are by the Appleby Archaeology Group, the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland, as well as the Bamburgh Research Project.

Members who were at our 2016 Corbridge AGM will recall the two presentations following the AGM business by Martin Joyce of the Appleby Archaeology Group and Phil Bowyer of Tynedale Archaeology. Martin outlined the plans for the Dig Appleby project which this year continues in Dig Appleby Digging Deeper at two Medieval burgage plots at the site of the almshouses known as Saint Anne’s Hospital. If you wish to take part in the excavations, you will need to book – but visitors are welcome at any time. Further details can be found here.

Phil, back in 2016, outlined the recent work by his group in the Tynedale area, which has now extended into adjoining Redesdale. The prehistoric site at Rattenraw which the group has surveyed and reported here is now being excavated as part of the Revitalising Redesdale Landscape Partnership; this excavation is also open to volunteers, but again requires booking if you want to be involved. Contact details for this excavation can be found in the Festival’s pages here.

These events are happening next week, but in the meantime there are events this weekend as well. The Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland are holding their monthly lecture looking at more recent investigations of old technology.

Please note that this lecture is not in the usual location where the society holds it meetings, and later than normal also, but will be at Alington House as indicated in the poster above. Directions can be found on the Festival’s website pages here for those unfamiliar with Durham.

Meanwhile the Bamburgh Research Project‘s 2019 season is continuing. During the weekend there are a number of half-day tutorials on environmental archaeology using modern technology to examine the past and its varied technologies. For this you will also need to book; the Saturday is reportedly booking up fast, but in case you are interested there are also Sunday sessions available. Please contact the project through the details of this page if you are interested in taking part.

A new future for mining in the North Pennines?
Also technologically related Pete Jackson has sent us notes of a forthcoming meeting also on Saturday looking to establish another local group in the area. He writes a meeting will be from 1100 to 1430 at the Upper Weardale Town Hall at St Johns Chapel.

‘The purpose of the meeting is to discuss a proposal about setting up a new group for the North Pennines to share information, advice and opinions about the North Pennines mining industries. For this meeting we are defining the North Pennines Orefield as east of the River Eden, south of Hadrian’s Wall, west of the North East Coalfield and north of the Stainmore Pass.

It is proposed that such a group could facilitate the sharing of information within the community of historians, explorers, geologists and archaeologists, to encourage research about the mining industries and provide information to national and local government authorities, as well as land and property owners. This would build on the previous North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty’s Oresome project which the group could continue. You can read more about the proposals at http://northdalemine.uk/2019/04/23/north-pennines-mines-research-group/.

Car parking is available at the east end of the village, adjacent to the Anglican Church, and the bus service 101 runs by Weardale Motor Services from Bishop Auckland railway station. Though hot drinks will be available on the day, you should organise your own lunch. For further details please free to contact me, Pete Jackson, through email or phone 01388 527 532′.

CBA National – a change in address
CBA National have now moved location in York. Rather than being at Bootham, to the north of the minister and beyond the city walls, they are now located on the other side of the river and within the walls. Their address for postal correspondence is now;

CBA National
92 Micklegate
York
YO1 6JX

Other details for email, website and phone details, however, remain unchanged.

CBA National’s Book Sale (continued)

The CBA National book sale as reported in our last issue is, according to the grapevine, now continuing to the end of July. There remain a number of North-land relevant publications which can be bought for a fraction of their original prices. If you haven’t yet had a look, the online shop can be visited here.

CBA North: mid-June newsletter

CBA North News

Our email to you this time is another mixture of content – from a number of sources also – and from around the CBA North region.

Following our usual events listing for the remains of June, we’ve a contribution from a member on how archaeology has inspired their artistic work and studies, something looking ahead to a conference in October (not that we are wishing summer away already), notes on recent publications, posters for events (including one happening on Saturday) and throughout the summer, as well as a book sale. There is so much yet to come in the intervening months, such as July’s Festival of Archaeology no less!

As ever we continue to keep our Events website page up-to-date with details – three further talks have been added, as well as the title of another now confirmed, on that page since our last email to you. Please let us know any additions or alterations to that page or indeed the listing below.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
19.06.2019

June and July Events 2019
June 2019
3 June – Gods and heroes: public and private in Pompeian houses, Dr Thea Ravesi [BAS]
5 June – Riding West: Roman Cavalry Tombstones at Hexham & Beyond, Lindsay Allason-Jones [TILLVAS]
25 June – The Yarm Helmet, Chris Caple [TAS]
26 June – Paints and Pigments in the Past: colouring in the Roman Frontiers, Louisa Campbell [SOCANTS]

July 2019
13 July – Work in Thebes, Jose Manuel Galan [NEAES]
20 July – The Archaeology of Domestic Innovation in the Country House, Prof Marilyn Palmer [ARCH & ARCH]
31 July – From Women’s Rights to Human Rights: How the Struggle for the Vote Changed the World, Rosie Serdiville [SOCANTS]

Archaeology, Pots and back again (twice): a member explains all
Lorraine Clay, both a member of Tynedale Archaeology and CBA North groups, as well as potter has sent us this short article on how archaeology inspires her artistic work. She writes;

‘I’m a ceramic artist who draws inspiration from archaeology, this is ponderings on archaeology and pottery.

I’ve always been interested in Archaeology since Dad took us to The Wall when children and finding rock art with Mum as a teenager. When I studied A Level Archaeology in 1990 for something to do after work, I couldn’t have imagined the path that it would take. The A Level was so disorganised that I swore I would never do another qualification and looked for a leisure evening class: woodwork was daytime so I plumped for pottery.

One of my first pieces was directly inspired by Scottish Celtic crosses, then direct influences came from visiting Minoan sites in Greece: these included the 6’ tall storage jars in Malia with coils as thick as an arm, and the curious kernos vessels in Heraklion Museum. You can learn a lot from copying something – such as the challenges the potter faced – one Greek pot I was having trouble with the handles, I put my mind in the place of a hot tired potter who wanted to drink Raki in the shade, and there it was! The simplest and quickest method looked just right.

A Cretan Krater

As I approached 13 years with the Civil Service I took the plunge to devote myself to becoming a full-time potter. I began studies at Newcastle College and for four years sold work in galleries and exhibitions and ran evening classes. In 2006 I commenced the Contemporary Ceramics degree at Newcastle and was accepted to be the pottery tutor for Ashmore House, an NHS mental health daycentre. Newcastle gave me the impetus to be more experimental and I began weathering clay, a technique I still practice today.

Weathering is inspired by mortality: a fingerprint survives on a Minoan storage jar, a Neolithic vessel is patterned with nail impressions but the potter is long gone. A cat’s paw-print on a Roman roof tile…

Like ceramics we believe we are immortal, living for tomorrow we stay in unsatisfying jobs until walking home in a gale a dislodged gargoyle takes us out. (I heard this story many years ago on the radio of a man dying this way after gales in Scotland; googling it now I find a US woman died in 2014 from a falling gargoyle – maybe it’s not rare at all!).

We are more like unfired clay, endangered by random circumstances, wind and rain.  I think this is why I joined Altogether Archaeology: too many years had gone by without digging, I couldn’t resist any more: my knees were in remission. On my first molehill survey I found a jet bead and was hooked again. And it seemed natural to get permission to take a little of the clay we dug up home!

Lorraine at the Whitley Castle mole-hill survey

In 2016 I took a chance and applied to the Ness of Brodgar and was euphoric when I was accepted!

Weathered bowl before firing (above), weathering and wood-fired (below left and right respectively)

Sometimes I use archive materials and clay from archaeological sites. For an exhibition at the Durham Oriental Museum I morphed cuneiform envelopes into curvaceous “promise boxes” using Forest Hall clay following their ancient Middle East counterparts.

For a second exhibition I was delighted with a label just bearing the name Petrie on one vase: I made pieces celebrating the people, including Flinders Petrie, in the chain that had brought the artefact to Durham using clay from digs. William Thacker, who set up the Oriental Museum, is shown by the transfer print which on smoke-fired Low Hauxley clay.


When the daycentre closed it didn’t take long to become bored. I heard you didn’t need an archaeology degree to do an Archaeology postgraduate course, so I contacted Antonia Thomas at UHI (University of the Highlands and Islands), who told me she was starting an Art and Archaeology module the following week!

3 Orkney clays: Back row – unfired with shell: unfired without shell
Front row – fired with shell: unfired without shell.

I enjoyed it so much I applied to UHI and Durham to do an MA in Archaeology, focusing especially on the British Neolithic. Deciding between the two was one of the toughest decisions I’ve had to make! Two terms in and I find myself writing about ceramics not rock art – in Dolni Vestonice, Gravettian finger fluting, materials analysis: before I knew it, I was suggesting Clay in the Palaeolithic for my dissertation! Watch this space!…….’ 

[Many thanks to Lorraine for writing this article; if this has inspired you or you want to share your own archaeological inspiration, perhaps in different ways, please feel free to send us a short article to us at cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org for our next issue].

Tullie House Conference
Elsa Price of Tullie House Museum, Carlisle, and Kate Sharpe of Durham University have sent us the poster below on a busy October weekend they are planning on the prehistory of the Cumbrian area. If you are interested in the day, read on and follow up through the contact details given – contributions from all are most welcome!

(Fairly recent) Tees Archaeology publications
From recent the River Tees Rediscovered Landscape Partnership, Tees Archaeology have fairly recently published a pair of short booklets The First Great Civil War in the Tees Valley and Industry in the Tees Valley. These short well-illustrated freely-available booklets give introductions to the many sites of particular note for their respective subjects.


Whilst many other Civil War battlefields and sieges are known across CBA North’s region, the first of these highlights many of the smaller skirmishes that rarely figure in the national literature. This booklet was written by Robin Daniels and Phil Philo. A further leaflet for the Piercebridge encounter described is also available further down the website page mentioned below.

Industry upon Teesside, however, needs no introduction. However sites familiar and unfamiliar are dealt with in the booklet by Alan Betteney, for the whole variety of Teesside industries, though this is a rather larger file to download. Nevertheless both of these are freely available as downloads from the Tees Archaeology website Downloads page.

TillVAS’ Iron Age Day
Equally industriously in the north of Northumberland, this Saturday sees the Till Valley Archaeology Society hold an Iron Age Day. The poster below gives details of what you can expect, inside and out, at Etal Village Hall to give more of a background and context to their recent excavations at nearby Mardon Farm.

CBA National’s June Booksale
CBA North members might be interested to know that CBA National is having a Spring Sale on publications. They have reduced prices on more than 75 books including many of our recent Research Reports and Practical Handbooks. Their online shop can be visited here. The sale ends on 30 June 2019 so ideal for finding some holiday reading and/or post-exam relaxation.

Prehistoric Pioneers: an Exhibition and Events
Charley Robson, of Durham University’s Prehistoric Pioneers Education and Outreach Team, has written to let us know of this exhibition. She writes;

‘The Prehistoric Pioneers exhibition is now open to the public at the Durham Museum of Archaeology, Palace Green, Durham, until 24 November 2019. The exhibition explores life in ancient Britain, from warfare to rituals, and the way Bronze Age people buried weapons and treasure in hidden hoards. Curated by the Durham’s MA Museum and Artefact Studies students, this exhibition gives a face to prehistoric people and challenges the idea that these were primitive cultures. 
 
To coincide with the exhibition, a pair of talks have been planned to take place on the 20 and 24 June and which are detailed in the poster below. Some more details on these events are given below for those who might be interested to attend. Booking information is given through the poster and places can be booked in emailing archaeology.museum@durham.ac.uk. Further information on the exhibition, including that available who cannot get to Durham themselves, as a series of podcasts is available here‘.

Further March Events – this weekend and next week

CBA North News
In this issue we have a number of announcements for events this weekend and next week. As some are happening soon you will need to book up. More news of projects and publications that have recently been completed or been published will be coming your way soon!

As we noted last time, we have updated our Local Societies and Groups section of our website. It now has the details of one of our local groups – the Northern Archaeology Group – so please continue to let us know any further changes. It is to your benefit to keep us abreast of changes.

Please feel free to circulate our news around your own contacts, especially your local group if you are one of our group member reps. Even if you yourself cannot attend the meetings listed someone else might. As noted in our last email to you we are especially interested in your views and news! We have a number of news items from Cumbria, mid-Northumberland and Durham to come in our next issue.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
06.03.2019

County Durham Archaeology Day 2019
David Mason, Principal Archaeologist at Durham County Council, has sent us details of this year’s County Durham Archaeology Day which is this Saturday. There is still some time to book your tickets if you would like to attend; clicking on the poster will take you to the online page.

CBA North will be having a stall there with a few publications for sale from £2 to £17 on a range of topics – feel free to say hello to the committee members there and let us know how we are doing as a regional group for you. Our group members the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland, as well as Teesside Archaeological Society, will also be having stalls there.

Eastern Borders History Gathering
For those that may be more interested in the northern parts of the CBA North region you may be more interested in the Eastern Borders History Gathering to be also held on Saturday. In this case the focus is on north Northumberland and the adjoining Berwickshire part of the Scottish Borders.

Some members may well remember previous discussions about the size of the CBA North region. On looking back through the CBA North archive some members suggested expanding the size of the region to include southern Scotland!

A CBA National event in our region
Your views are particularly welcome at two events next week as well. The results of the survey carried out by CBA National last year, whose link we carried in the December email to you, have now been compiled. We and CBA National are keen to hear your further views to develop your membership and what you would like to do in the future.

All members of CBA North by whatever permutation of National-to-North, North-only, individual, joint, family, group and student category that you come under are welcome to take part in the following two events on Monday and Tuesday, 11th and 12th March.

Claire Shirtcliffe of Tricolor Associates writes;
“We are working with the Council for British Archaeology (CBA) to develop their audiences and help them understand what they can do to break down the barriers to people learning more about archaeology.

I am delighted to invite to you to a focus group session on 12th March  2019 at The Bridge Hotel, Castle Square, Newcastle at 6:30pm. If you would like to attend this session, please pre-register your attendance by emailing cba@tricolorassociates.co.uk with the following details: Your Name, Contact Number, Session slot and location (Newcastle).

If you can’t make the session, but would still love to be involved, we are organising an online webinar: “How to Make Archaeology Accessible for Different People” on 11th March 2019 at 7:30pm. Please visit https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3188015670057516556 to register. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. We would be delighted if you were able to join us on the 12th March 2019 and look forward to hearing from you.

Kind regards,
Emma
Emma Shirtcliffe”

Once again CBA North Committee members will also be there to hear your views as we are the regional group within the local-regional-national group structure of CBA, but feel free to let us know your views at any other time.

Dear CBA North Members,

It has been some while since the last CBA North email news. As ever much has been happening behind the scenes and we have some end of the year things for you here. Our website pages, as well as below, now reflect the changes in committee following our August AGM in Newcastle; those who weren’t there missed an interesting meeting, as well as the following detailed, and excellent, tour of St Nicholas Cathedral, during the summer.

We have had some comments (with the preference for more ad hoc emails) to our last quick question of you our members in our last email, but all feedback is welcome at any other 2018 or 2019 time.

Our next email to you will be at the start of the New Year; we already have some news items in hand, but we would gladly welcome a few more for January.

Is this a Christmas card or caption competition?
In recent years we’ve had a series of suitably seasonal pictures showing some ridge and furrow earthworks in the snow, a mural from a church and last year the Kirknewton magi sculpture. This year’s offering is from your new Chair Don O’Meara, who took up office in August, noting it a Nenthead Christmas.

Whether you regard this as a Christmas card or ripe for a caption competition we wish you our best wishes for Christmas and the New Year from all the CBA North Committee.

Events to come in 2019?
There are near 50 events listed ready for the 2019 events listing and our website Events page which we send on the link to at the start of the year. However we know that there will be more than this mere figure, including those events of some of our own group members. If you would like your group’s programme to be included, please let us know over the Christmas to New Year break. As ever the website page will be updated with fresh dates as we know of them.

Community Archaeology survey 2018; the results
One of our previous emails this year included a link to CBA National’s survey of all community archaeology groups; thank you to every who took the time to fill in this survey. The results are now out in CBA National’s CBA Research Bulletin number 6; this can be found online here.

The full report is 56 pages, but there are a number of headline recommendations and thoughts to;

  1. Create a central digital platform which gives clear and advice, signposting and guidance for community groups with a local and national collaborative space.
  2. Establish a learning and development provision at county level.
  3. Assess the logistics and viability of a bespoke accreditation scheme.
  4. Actively engage in partnerships which encourage diverse participation.
  5. Create a survey to provide comparable relevant data of younger age groups.
    If you have any thoughts or ideas on these recommendations – for CBA North and/or CBA National – for what we do in the future, please feel free to email us your views to cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org. We are progressing some ideas for 2019, but keen to know what you would like as well.

Archaeology for All Audience Development Surveys
Claire Corkhill has written to us about work associated with the current Archaeology for All campaign of CBA National. She writes and welcomes any responses to these surveys whether you are a CBA National to North member or not, CBA group member or not, that;

As I’m sure you’re all aware, the CBA recently received a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund and we’re currently undertaking work that will help us become a stronger organisation for the future. As part of this we have developed a short survey to help us find out what people think of the CBA.

You can complete the survey as an individual and as a representative of an organisation and we’d encourage you to respond to both surveys. They only take a few minutes to complete but will help shape the future of the CBA.

You can access the surveys via the following link:
http://new.archaeologyuk.org/news/archaeology-is-for-all
Please could I also ask you to share the survey with your members.

Many thanks for your help and time.

Best wishes
Claire
Claire Corkill

Executive Administrator, CBA National

If you would like copies of the full questionnaires to have a look at to mull over or discuss your answers with others, before filling them in online, please feel free to get in contact with us.

 

CBA North’s event: 2018 AGM and Newcastle Cathedral tour

Council for British Archaeology North
c/o The Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle
Great North Museum: Hancock
Barras Bridge
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE2 4PT
 
29 July 2018

Dear CBA North Members,

Notice of CBA North Annual General Meeting,
Saturday 18 August 2018

I write to give you the formal notice of our Annual General Meeting which will take place on Saturday 18 August 2018 at 10.30am. This will be in the rooms of Saint Nicholas Cathedral, Newcastle upon Tyne (see stnicholascathedral.co.uk/ for more).

The agenda is given below. Business will begin promptly at 10.30am, but people can arrive from 10.00am for tea or coffee refreshments. A summary of the 2017 AGM is available on request. Please confirm your attendance, or send apologies in, for this meeting through an email to us.

I would encourage you to get involved with CBA North – we are the only regional archaeological group for both individuals and groups interested in the archaeology and history of our region as a whole. Our goal is to promote at a local, regional, and national level (via the CBA networks) the archaeology, history and historic environment of the North-East and Cumbria.

CBA North Committee, as at any other time, welcome thoughts on what you think we should be doing in the forthcoming year. If you would like to raise an issue at the AGM please let us know at least seven days before the meeting. Group members should identify their representatives for the day.

If you or your group would like to give a short update or display of your own activities following the morning business part of the AGM please let us know.

We will then break for lunch – you are welcome to bring your own lunch to the cathedral if preferred, though numerous cafes and restaurants are close by – before reconvening at 2.00pm for a tour of our venue as church, cathedral as well as a prison at times. This will be led by David Heslop, a familiar face to many of you, now Cathedral Archaeologist, who will be detailing recent and current project work in the cathedral.

I would be most grateful if you could let me know whether you will be attending the meeting. Please email me by Wednesday 15 August 2018 at the very latest.

Yours sincerely,

Keith Elliott
Secretary, CBA North

Council for British Archaeology North AGM 2018 Agenda
Registered Charity Number 1098854

NOTICE is hereby given of the Annual General Meeting of the Charity to be held at Saturday 18 August 2018. This will be in the rooms of Saint Nicholas Cathedral, Newcastle upon Tyne on Saturday 18 August 2018 at 10.30am precisely for the following purposes:

1          to receive and consider the final accounts for the year ended 31 July 2018
2          to receive and consider the annual report for the year ended 31 July 2018
3          Chair’s Report (including Treasurer’s Report)
4          election of CBA North committee members
5          any other business notified to the Chairman at least seven days in advance of the meeting or business from the floor
6          any local society update talks or displays
 
By order of the committee

Chris Jones
CBA North Chair
Dated 29 July 2018

1. Any member of the charity aged 18 and over is entitled to vote at the AGM. Organisational members are entitled to one vote and should appoint a representative to vote on their behalf.

2. Any member of the charity aged 18 and over who is entitled to attend, speak and vote at the above mentioned meeting may appoint a proxy to attend, speak and, on a poll, vote instead of that member. A proxy need not be a member of the charity.

CBA North’s joint April Conference: Archaeology and the small finds of North-East England

CBA North News
We are delighted to announce the first of the ‘big’ conferences in CBA North region to you as Archaeology and the small finds of North-East England. This is one that we are jointly supporting with the Finds Research Group, our group member the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland as well as Durham University.

Below are details of the programme which covers all periods between the Anglo-Saxon and the 19th century, across much of our region from Coquetdale to Teesside (and just over into Yarm) where specifically named and more besides, this conference promises to be a most interesting and fully packed day. Details on how to book a discounted place as a CBA North member are given below, clicking on the posters will take you to the online booking page.

In case you would like to forward this information onto others, please use the links in the left-hand portion of this email or you can send on the link http://www.aasdn.org.uk/NEarch18.htm.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
03.04.2018

Archaeology and the small finds of North-East England

Various CBA North Committee members will be there, with various discounted books for sale from £2 to £20 on various topics as well, so feel free to have a word with us or at any other time.

Further details on our co-partners for this conference can be found through the various links below;

The Finds Research Group promotes  the study of artefacts from archaeological sites dating from the post-Roman period onwards. It is well-known, even outside finds circles, for producing many datasheets summarising particular classes of objects – some of which can now be downloaded from their website.

– Durham University, and indeed its archaeology department, is no stranger to appearing in CBA North’s materials over many years. Current information on the department can be found online here.

– our group member the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland will be already familiar to you as we’ve announced their various lectures in the past. As a follow-on from the conference on the following day their regular meeting is also given over to a finds-based theme; Dr Eleanor Standley will be giving the lecture Spinning yarns and skinning rabbits in the later Medieval period: new contributions to the archaeology of religion, sexuality and daily life.

CBA National’s Community Archaeology Survey
Readers will recall our last email carried the news of, and link to, a survey of community archaeology. The deadline for this survey has now been extended to Sunday 8 April 2018. Here is the link again in case you have yet to fill in the survey, or can send it to someone else,  https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/CBA_Community_archaeology_2018. Please fill in this survey if you have the time!