Tag Archives: Bamburgh Research Project

CBA North: July (Festival of Archaeology) special issue

CBA North News
As many of you will know the Festival of Archaeology for this year, till the 28 July, has now started – as has, at times, severe rain showers. Nonetheless across our region are a number of events planned. Indeed one of those events is today. Gillian Waters, the Festival Coordinator at CBA National, explains what is happening nationally below.

This year’s theme is archaeology and technology with some of our own local group members who have organised their own events to coincide with the Festival. Details of those events are given special mention below, but all link into technology – whether of that past or those of the present looking into the past – in some way. Other events, of course, are also happening and Pete Jackson has sent us details of a further event this Saturday. The 2019 Hadrian’s Wall Pilgrimage also starts Saturday, so lots of things happening and across CBA North-land to cater for all tastes.

Best wishes for the summer,

CBA North Committee
17.07.2019

Festival of Archaeology 2019
Gillian, as Festival Coordinator, writes; ‘The Festival of Archaeology is a UK-wide annual two-week event, coordinated by the Council for British Archaeology. It showcases the work of archaeologists and encourages people of all ages and abilities to engage with their own locality and heritage through archaeology. This year’s Festival will take place from 13 to 28 July 2019 and features special events hosted by hundreds of organisations across the UK with hidden sites to explore and new techniques to learn, with talks, tours, workshops, re-enactments, and activities for the archaeologically inclined of all ages.

This year the Council for British Archaeology is also organising on-line festival events – so that no matter where you are you can get involved in the Festival of Archaeology. On 17 July [today!] the CBA partners with the National Trust for #AskanArchaeologist. This live Twitter event gives you the chance to put your question to archaeologists from across the UK. On Youth Takeover Day on 22 July, our band of dedicated volunteers will be masterminding and coordinating the Council for British Archaeology’s social media streams. Volunteers will also be helping behind the scenes on A Day in Archaeology which takes place on the same day. Archaeologists will be showcasing the enormous variety of exciting career and volunteering opportunities that are available, as they post their own blogs and share details of their work.

Find out more details of the Festival on our website https://festival.archaeologyuk.org.

Whatever events you get involved with during the Festival of Archaeology let us know about it via social media with the hashtag #FestivalofArchaeology. You can keep up-to-the-minute with what is happening by keeping an eye to our own social media presences as per below;

Twitter: @archaeologyuk
Facebook: /archaeologyuk
Instagram: @archaeologyuk

To find out more about the work of the Council for British Archaeology visit our website: 
https://new.archaeologyuk.org/. For more information contact the CBA office on 01904 671417 or email festival2019@archaeologyuk.org.

If anyone wants more details that might be unavailable online, please feel free to email Gillian at gillianwaters@archaeologuk.org.

CBA North’s local group members: their own Festival activities
Some of our own local group members are running Festival activities this year across the region. These are by the Appleby Archaeology Group, the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland, as well as the Bamburgh Research Project.

Members who were at our 2016 Corbridge AGM will recall the two presentations following the AGM business by Martin Joyce of the Appleby Archaeology Group and Phil Bowyer of Tynedale Archaeology. Martin outlined the plans for the Dig Appleby project which this year continues in Dig Appleby Digging Deeper at two Medieval burgage plots at the site of the almshouses known as Saint Anne’s Hospital. If you wish to take part in the excavations, you will need to book – but visitors are welcome at any time. Further details can be found here.

Phil, back in 2016, outlined the recent work by his group in the Tynedale area, which has now extended into adjoining Redesdale. The prehistoric site at Rattenraw which the group has surveyed and reported here is now being excavated as part of the Revitalising Redesdale Landscape Partnership; this excavation is also open to volunteers, but again requires booking if you want to be involved. Contact details for this excavation can be found in the Festival’s pages here.

These events are happening next week, but in the meantime there are events this weekend as well. The Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland are holding their monthly lecture looking at more recent investigations of old technology.

Please note that this lecture is not in the usual location where the society holds it meetings, and later than normal also, but will be at Alington House as indicated in the poster above. Directions can be found on the Festival’s website pages here for those unfamiliar with Durham.

Meanwhile the Bamburgh Research Project‘s 2019 season is continuing. During the weekend there are a number of half-day tutorials on environmental archaeology using modern technology to examine the past and its varied technologies. For this you will also need to book; the Saturday is reportedly booking up fast, but in case you are interested there are also Sunday sessions available. Please contact the project through the details of this page if you are interested in taking part.

A new future for mining in the North Pennines?
Also technologically related Pete Jackson has sent us notes of a forthcoming meeting also on Saturday looking to establish another local group in the area. He writes a meeting will be from 1100 to 1430 at the Upper Weardale Town Hall at St Johns Chapel.

‘The purpose of the meeting is to discuss a proposal about setting up a new group for the North Pennines to share information, advice and opinions about the North Pennines mining industries. For this meeting we are defining the North Pennines Orefield as east of the River Eden, south of Hadrian’s Wall, west of the North East Coalfield and north of the Stainmore Pass.

It is proposed that such a group could facilitate the sharing of information within the community of historians, explorers, geologists and archaeologists, to encourage research about the mining industries and provide information to national and local government authorities, as well as land and property owners. This would build on the previous North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty’s Oresome project which the group could continue. You can read more about the proposals at http://northdalemine.uk/2019/04/23/north-pennines-mines-research-group/.

Car parking is available at the east end of the village, adjacent to the Anglican Church, and the bus service 101 runs by Weardale Motor Services from Bishop Auckland railway station. Though hot drinks will be available on the day, you should organise your own lunch. For further details please free to contact me, Pete Jackson, through email or phone 01388 527 532′.

CBA National – a change in address
CBA National have now moved location in York. Rather than being at Bootham, to the north of the minister and beyond the city walls, they are now located on the other side of the river and within the walls. Their address for postal correspondence is now;

CBA National
92 Micklegate
York
YO1 6JX

Other details for email, website and phone details, however, remain unchanged.

CBA National’s Book Sale (continued)

The CBA National book sale as reported in our last issue is, according to the grapevine, now continuing to the end of July. There remain a number of North-land relevant publications which can be bought for a fraction of their original prices. If you haven’t yet had a look, the online shop can be visited here.

Bamburgh Research Project Free Lectures June- July 2014

BAMBURGH RESEARCH PROJECT LECTURES IN BELFORD
During this year’s excavation at Bamburgh there are lectures at 7:00 pm each Tuesday evening at the Bell View Centre, 33 West Street, Belford NE70 7QB. Free and open to the public.

17 June, Flodden 500, Archaeological Investigations of the Battle of Flodden. Chris Burgess
24 June, The Burnt Mound Misconception (Part 1): Excavation Strategy, TomGardner
1 July, The Burnt Mound Misconception (Part 2): Environmental Strategy, TomGardner
8 July, The Art and Material Culture of Northumbria.   Stephanie Chapman,
15 July, The Anglo-Saxon Earls of Northumbria. Graeme Young

They may also arrange a summary of the season’s results during their final week.

Bamburgh Research Project

Exciting new finds at the Bradford Kaims wetland excavation by Graeme Young of the Bamburgh Research Project

Over the last few year the Bamburgh Research Project has been excavating at a wetland site at Bradford Kaims, some 5km to the west of Bamburgh Village, in parallel with the long term excavation at Bamburgh Castle. The new site has been investigated as part of an English Heritage and the Heritage Lottery Fund supported Project aimed at expanding community involvement and outreach as well as increasing our understanding of this fascinating landscape.

Geophysical survey, kindly donated by Geophysical Surveys of Bradford, and test pitting has revealed the presence of at least 12 burnt mounds. These lie around what would have been the dry ground around the former lake, now peat filled and covered by pasture.

This summer the unusually dry weather has been a real boon, allowing the extension of Trench 6, which contains the first burnt mound we discovered, down slope and into the peat layers. This burnt mound particularly intrigues us as an archaeomagnetic date on some fired clay around a stone hearth has been dated to 4230 BC, suggesting a very early mound indeed. Right below the mound and in the upper layers of peat we uncovered a round-wood timber platform, of some considerable extent. In fact we are yet to find north, south and west sides, but we do know that it extends for some metres in all of three directions.

Preserved organic remains from prehistory are rare discoveries, so this caused a  great deal of excitement. All the more so when a preserved wooden paddle was found lying on top of the timber platform. In addition to the paddle the recovery of Carinated Bowl pottery, from the layers above the paddle, provides additional dating evidence to support the early date of the mound. All things considered it looks like the paddle and platform date back to around 4000 BC.

Find out more about the Bamburgh Research Project and the Bamburgh Castle and Bradford Kaims sites on our blog

www.bamburghresearchproject.wordpress.com

www.bamburghresearchproject.co.uk

Opportunities to join the training excavation in June and July of 2014 are available, with details on the website under ‘field school’.