Tag Archives: Archaeology

CBA North: Start of April newsletter

CBA North News
In this issue we have the details of the April events soon to come your way, as well as news from a number of projects and publications from across CBA North-land from four of our local group members. This email was drafted out on Saint Cuthbert’s Day, and like him we criss-cross the region in what news we have to share.


From Cumbria we have a summary of the Appleby Archaeology Group’s investigations across their local golf course (including rare Bronze Age evidence) whilst from Northumberland we have an update on the Border Roads Project of Coquetdale Community Archaeology. Members may recall the fieldwork and plans for both of these projects, here we now report upon their successful completion and publication.

From two other of our group members, the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland once again and the Northumberland Archaeological Group we have notices of their own recent publications. The contents of both volumes also listed for you here as well.

Please feel free to circulate our news around your own contacts and groups. We hope that our next email to you will be out mid-month, next month, reporting further news from across the region.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
31.03.2019

April Events 2019
1 April – The Enigmatic Trusty’s Hill: Royal Capital of Rheged, Dr Chris Bowles [BAS]

3 April – AGM and An Update on the 2018 Mardon Excavation, Richard Carlton [TILLVAS]
8 April – Lowick Races (Horses, Bikes and Athletics) and the Lowick Feast 19th-20th centuries, Julie Gibbs and cast [Lowick Heritage Group]
8 April – Mediaeval village landscape in Cumbria, David Johnson [LUNESDALE]
9 April – Cold War to Coal Trains – TOPS, British Railways’ First Computer Train Operating System, Johnathan Aylen [NEWCOMEN]
10 April – A History of Alnwick Castle Gardens as revealed through excavation and building recording, Jenny Proctor [NAG]
11 April – A Roman bath house at Stanwix, Frank Giecco [APPLEBY]
11 April – The Eslington Sword, Prof Sam Turner [CCA]
24 April – Magnificent Women and the Revolutionary Machine; The extraordinary individuals who founded the Women’s Engineering Society in 1919, Henrietta Heald [SOCANTS]
25 April – Annual General Meeting and Chairman’s Choice [Tyneside Industrial Archaeology Group]
27 April – Long Meg and her Daughters, Paul Frodsham [ALTOGETHER]
27 April – Living in Harm’s Way: Further reflections on the Development of Hornby Castle, Wensleydale 1000-1700, Erik Matthews [ARCH & ARCH]

[As noted we continue to keep our Events website page up-to-date with details; please let us know any additions or alterations to that page or indeed this listing. More one-off or annual events can be sent to us at any time, Ed.]

Appleby Archaeology Group: Fieldwork on the Green
Our CBA North AGM in 2016 included a talk from our group member the Appleby Archaeology Group on their forthcoming Dig Appleby which we covered in a later email to you. However the group’s previous project has now been published. Here Martin Railton, Research Officer of the group, gives us a summary of their project;

‘Between 2009 and 2013 the Appleby Archaeology Group carried out a number of small-scale surveys and excavations across a range of monuments located at Brackenber Moor adjacent to the Appleby Golf Course. Despite the hazards of flying golf balls and more, the group carried out both geophysical surveys and excavations of a range of features in the area. Some of these features were freshly identified by the group during the survey carried out in 2009,whilst others had been known about – albeit misidentified – in the archaeological literature for some time.

The highlight of the excavation aimed to record the details of one of these earlier recorded sites – a roughly circular flat area, partly surrounded by a pair of crescent-shaped ditches, was thought to be one of the chain of Roman signal stations that operated between the Stainmore Pass and the larger Roman roads to the west and east. The large post-holes and structure of a signal station were expected. However our excavations revealed this to be a different type of monument altogether and one much, by thousands of years, older.

The feature was revealed to be an enclosed cremation cemetery – a funerary monument typical of the Early Bronze Age. Our excavations across the centre of monument revealed a number of pits, some containing human cremated remains and prehistoric pottery dating to the Bronze Age. Samples were taken at the time of excavation and only now, following the post-excavation process, can a fuller story of the monument be told. This appears to have been a multi-phase monument and, surprisingly, extending into Middle Bronze Age times from the radiocarbon dating of samples of human bone. These yielded a date of 1740 to 1630 BC when sampled at the SUERC lab. This was quite surprising when nationally evidence of funerary activity starts to disappear.

Other sites were sampled, but perhaps none with so spectacular results as the cremation cemetery. These included a scheduled cairn of likely Bronze Age date, which revealed evidence for earlier Mesolithic and Neolithic activity in the vicinity. Our fieldwork was carried out by the group in conjunction with the North Pennines AONB Altogether Archaeology Project with support from Wardell Armstrong Archaeology. We are grateful to them for their support and the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society for funding the post-excavation work, without which the Transactions article could not have been published’.

[The full excavation report can be read in the most recent Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society (3rd series volume 18), Ed.].

The Border Roads Project: Taking the High Road
David Jones, Secretary of Coquetdale Community Archaeology, reports on their recent work as The Border Roads Project. He writes;

‘Based in North Northumberland, Coquetdale Community Archaeology (CCA) was founded in 2008 at the conclusion of a community archaeology project funded by the Northumberland National Park Authority. One of its first major projects as an independent group was the identification and excavation of a thirteenth-century fulling mill on the River Coquet at Barrowburn, about five miles upstream from Alwinton. Built by the Newminster monks from Morpeth, the project uncovered one of the best-preserved medieval wheel pits in the country, with a wheel configuration otherwise known only from the sixteenth century.

The project was a success, with large numbers of volunteers, many visitors, and two papers in Archaeologia Aeliana. But rather than rest on their laurels, CCA decided to follow this up with a broader initiative, one that would include not just excavation, but also walking, photography, surveying, research, design and writing.

The Border Roads project, reported in earlier CBA newsletters and funded by the HLF and the National Park, started in 2014 and ended in December. Its focus was on the rich set of archaeology found along the Border Roads – the ancient routes through the Cheviots such as Dere Street, Clennell Street and The Street that connect what are now England and Scotland.

The purpose of the project was to research and document this archaeology, but above all to communicate its presence to as wide an audience as possible. It’s very clear that many people who visit the hills are unaware of the history they are moving through – walking past ridges, shapes and ruins in the landscape without any real idea of what they are missing.

So CCA teams delved into archives, travelled the roads and planned walks and tours. There were excavations too – four different sites in the five summers of the project, often two in one year. There were four seasons of work at a site by the Hepden Burn, where an unprepossessing rectangular earthwork was found to conceal not only a seventeenth-century agricultural building but, under that, a carefully-laid paved medieval floor.

This site has been the subject of a recent excavation report in Medieval Archaeology (Nolan and Jones, 2018 volume 62/2 in the Fieldwork Highlights for 2017).

Excavation has now started on a scheduled site at the deserted settlement of Linbrig, also by the Coquet. Although the Border Roads project has finished, this work will continue until 2020, with the objective of looking at several structures on the site, including what are probably farmhouses and a corn drying kiln.

With its focus on communication, the project has produced a website (www.border-roads.org/) and two books. The first of these – The Old Tracks through the Cheviots – weighs in at over 200 pages. Its early chapters cover the history of the hills, the records left about them and the types of structures found there. Then each route is examined in turn, with details of the archaeology along them.
The second book – Walking the Old Tracks of the Cheviots – is a portable ring-bound guide to nine carefully-documented walks on either side of the border. Again in full colour and designed to be carried out on the hills, it provides detailed route instructions and precise map references, as well descriptions and histories of what people might otherwise miss.

Both books are available from book shops, on-line from the usual suspects, or direct from the publisher, Northern Heritage.

With all the work that’s gone into it, the involvement of over 90 volunteers and the outputs described, it’s clear the project has been a success. Other people think so too. In November CCA won a competition organised by National Parks UK for their Volunteer Project of the Year. Open to all volunteer projects across the country, and for any kind of work in a National Park, the award brought not only a trophy, but a bursary of £1000 to help CCA continue its work’.

Recent publications 1: Durham Archaeological Journal 21
Also fairly hot off the press our group members the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland – the ‘Arch & Arch’ – who reported their 2018 activities in our last issue, have published the latest volume of their Durham Archaeological Journal

The varied contents of volume 21 include the following;

The excavation of an Anglo-Saxon arable enclosure at Easington, County Durham by Kevin Horsley, 1-5
Hexham Abbey, Northumberland: archaeological excavation, monitoring and historic building recording 2012-14 by Richard Carlton and Peter Ryder, 6-81
A late medieval pectoral cross recovered from the River Wear near Elvet Bridge, Durham City by Gary Bankhead, 83-102
Kepier water-mill, Durham City: a conjectural reconstruction by John M Coffey, 103-134
Hebburn Hall, South Tyneside by Richard Pears, 135-165
Forgotten antiquarians? William Greenwell and his northern contemporaries by Rob Young, 167-186

[Members who attended our various Hexham meetings in 2013 will recall the archaeological work required in advance of the development of the Abbey Centre. It is those pieces of work that are reported in the Hexham Abbey article of this issue, Ed.].

Recent publications 2: Northern Archaeology 23
Gordon Moir, Editor for the Northumberland Archaeological Group, gives us details of their latest Northern Archaeology. He writes;

‘The Northumberland Archaeological Group (NAG) announces the recent publication of volume 23 of its journal Northern Archaeology. This volume is dedicated to the memory of Colin Burgess, the founder of NAG, who died in 2014. Contents relate to the archaeological life of Colin and the work he directed in Portugal; it includes colour pictures, maps, diagrams and plans, is printed on high quality cartridge paper and with a paper binding.
 
Copies may be purchased from the Editor: Gordon Moir, 7 Albury Road, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 3PE; gordon.moir@blueyonder.co.uk ; 0191 284 5062. The prices are: in the UK £17 which includes postage and packing; within Europe (which includes Eire) £21 and for the rest of the world £25. These costs are for both Institutions and individuals. Cheques should be made payable to “Northumberland Archaeological Group”. For details of bank transfer contact the Editor.

The contents are:
Editorial, iii-iv
A later-20th century mould for casting a Bronze Age from the north-east of England; A life of Colin Burgess
by Roger Miket, 1-21
Colin Burgess: a Bibliography, 23-34
Colin Burgess and the Bronze Age Studies Group by John Waddell, 35-40
NAG: The First Twenty-Five Years, 1973-1998 by Gordon Moir, 41-54
Archaeological Work in the Évora Area – Preamble by Gordon Moir, 55-56
The Évora Project 1986-91, 1993 by Frances Lynch, 57-60
The Megalithic Tomb Survey by Frances Lynch, 61-77
Excavations and Survey at Monte do Casão, 1990 by Anthony Harding and Melanie Pomeroy, 79-84
The Late Bronze and Iron Age enclosures of the Évora region by Catriona Gibson, 85-95
The Search for the Roman hinterland of Évora: thirty years on by Steven Willis, 97-106
Évora Archaeological Survey: Fieldwalking by Margaret Maddison, 107-118
The impact of the Évora Archaeological Survey (EAS) project in Portuguese Archaeology by Virgílio Hipólito Correia, 119-124

The Bibliography is an augmented and extended version of those published previously.

 
Colin in France, April 2013, on his last Archaeotrekker’s trip, at La Chaire à Calvin, near Angouleme.

Corrections
Our last email noted the changes made for the Local Societies and Groups website page for the Northern Archaeological Group, rather this should have been the Northern Archaeology Group. In case of any other alterations to this, or any other website page, please let us know by emailing cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org.

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CBA North: further events to come

Dear CBA North Members,

The clocks now changed, the weather has also. Summer has ended – but CBA North has been busy. Whilst we put together more news of our own activities, and look forward to carrying your news for others to hear of, CBA North Committee has also been slightly changing. More details in the next email.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 30.10.2018

Further events added to our website
Further regular local society events of our group members, and more, continue to be added to our Events page on the website throughout the year. This lists some events through to May next year; if you would like something added, please feel to get in touch.

Lake District National Park’s Annual Conference
Louise Martin, who spoke at our April 2017 conference, now of the Lake District National Park Authority, has written to us with a poster of the park’s annual conference. Please note the closing date for booking which is close at hand this week.

Arbeia Society Conference
Paul Bidwell, who gave a quick resume of last year’s Carlisle meeting of the Study Group for Roman Pottery, has also sent us a pair of posters for the Arbeia Society’s conference this year.

A quick question to CBA North members
A quick question for you – feedback is always helpful from members and others. Would you like to see more emails at irregular intervals as we become aware of events? Or would you like less emails at more regular intervals?

Your answer will help in the timetabling of the behind the scenes of work of CBA North Committee who, of course, welcome your views at any time. We’ll let you know the results also in our next email.

CBA North’s event: 2018 AGM and Newcastle Cathedral tour

Council for British Archaeology North
c/o The Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle
Great North Museum: Hancock
Barras Bridge
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE2 4PT
 
29 July 2018

Dear CBA North Members,

Notice of CBA North Annual General Meeting,
Saturday 18 August 2018

I write to give you the formal notice of our Annual General Meeting which will take place on Saturday 18 August 2018 at 10.30am. This will be in the rooms of Saint Nicholas Cathedral, Newcastle upon Tyne (see stnicholascathedral.co.uk/ for more).

The agenda is given below. Business will begin promptly at 10.30am, but people can arrive from 10.00am for tea or coffee refreshments. A summary of the 2017 AGM is available on request. Please confirm your attendance, or send apologies in, for this meeting through an email to us.

I would encourage you to get involved with CBA North – we are the only regional archaeological group for both individuals and groups interested in the archaeology and history of our region as a whole. Our goal is to promote at a local, regional, and national level (via the CBA networks) the archaeology, history and historic environment of the North-East and Cumbria.

CBA North Committee, as at any other time, welcome thoughts on what you think we should be doing in the forthcoming year. If you would like to raise an issue at the AGM please let us know at least seven days before the meeting. Group members should identify their representatives for the day.

If you or your group would like to give a short update or display of your own activities following the morning business part of the AGM please let us know.

We will then break for lunch – you are welcome to bring your own lunch to the cathedral if preferred, though numerous cafes and restaurants are close by – before reconvening at 2.00pm for a tour of our venue as church, cathedral as well as a prison at times. This will be led by David Heslop, a familiar face to many of you, now Cathedral Archaeologist, who will be detailing recent and current project work in the cathedral.

I would be most grateful if you could let me know whether you will be attending the meeting. Please email me by Wednesday 15 August 2018 at the very latest.

Yours sincerely,

Keith Elliott
Secretary, CBA North

Council for British Archaeology North AGM 2018 Agenda
Registered Charity Number 1098854

NOTICE is hereby given of the Annual General Meeting of the Charity to be held at Saturday 18 August 2018. This will be in the rooms of Saint Nicholas Cathedral, Newcastle upon Tyne on Saturday 18 August 2018 at 10.30am precisely for the following purposes:

1          to receive and consider the final accounts for the year ended 31 July 2018
2          to receive and consider the annual report for the year ended 31 July 2018
3          Chair’s Report (including Treasurer’s Report)
4          election of CBA North committee members
5          any other business notified to the Chairman at least seven days in advance of the meeting or business from the floor
6          any local society update talks or displays
 
By order of the committee

Chris Jones
CBA North Chair
Dated 29 July 2018

1. Any member of the charity aged 18 and over is entitled to vote at the AGM. Organisational members are entitled to one vote and should appoint a representative to vote on their behalf.

2. Any member of the charity aged 18 and over who is entitled to attend, speak and vote at the above mentioned meeting may appoint a proxy to attend, speak and, on a poll, vote instead of that member. A proxy need not be a member of the charity.

Events & Exhibitions in May & June across CBA North-land

CBA North News
Apologies for the delay in sending you further news of events across CBA North-land for May and June. As you will see it is something of a bumper issue with many different events coming up soon. Another similarly-sized email is already in preparation with yet more events and announcements to come. Some of these events will bring up-to-date findings from recent research and projects following on from previous emails to you, some deal with new topics different again. For some of these events you will need to book up.

As many of you will know the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) will take effect soon. We will be emailing everyone on what GDPR means for us to hold and process your information, and more importantly for you to continue to receive CBA North news and information. Further details for these will appear in time on the CBA North website as well to accord with these regulations. However if you you have any immediate questions, please feel free to let us know of them.

Once again, if you would like to submit anything on your local group’s recent activities or plans for this summer, please let us know. Keep an eye to our Events page on the website for any additions to the regular talks and lectures of various groups across the CBA North region. Additions to this page are made throughout the year as we know of them.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
13.05.2018

Events this week
1) Border Archaeological Society lecture: Finding a Lost Lindisfarne Estate 
There are a number of events coming up this week. These are located in all parts of our region, they start tomorrow night at Berwick with the next of the Border Archaeological Society’s [BAS] lectures. Josie McChrystal, their Secretary, gives us some more details of what promises to be an interesting talk.

Josie informs us that;

“In the early years, the Lindisfarne monastery built up a huge land holding in Northumberland and southern Scotland but in the troubled times of the Viking era some of these lands were taken away from them. Later writers referred to these lands without knowing much about them. We will discover one of these estates in mid-Northumberland on Monday evening.  

The renowned archaeologist Colm O’Brien will be the speaker on this occasion. He has excavated in Northumberland and taught at the universities of Newcastle and Sunderland. He is especially interested in the Age of Bede and now, in retirement, he co-directs the Bernician Studies Group, a community learning group with projects in Northumberland and in County Donegal in Ireland.

As ever, the lecture begins at 7.30 at Berwick Parish Church Hall (Holy Trinity) off The Parade, TD15 1DF. Please tell your family and friends about what promises to be a very interesting evening. All are welcome”.

2) The First World War in the Tees Valley Conference
Dave Errickson, Chair of Teesside Archaeological Society [TAS] one of our group members, has let us know of another event. Members will remember our previous note of our Home Front Legacy workshop in 2015 which highlighted ways groups could look out for and record First World War sites. In contrast to Lindisfarne and the north of our region, this concentrates upon these more modern sites in the south of our region and includes work carried out by the TAS group and others on Teesside recording them. All the talks in this free conference relate to the First World War in some way. The conference is in Middlesbrough and on Saturday this week, but you will need to book places for this. They can be obtained from this Eventbrite page here.

3) North East Ancient Egypt Society lecture: Tell Timai and its Terracotta Figures
Also on Saturday, but in Newcastle, is also the next lecture of the North East Ancient Egypt Society on something different again.

The first Tyne and Wear Archaeology Day
Jennifer Morrison, Tyne and Wear Archaeological Officer, has sent us details of the first Tyne and Wear Archaeology Day which is coming up soon in next month on Saturday, 16 June.

Again you will need to book and again this is a fully packed day. However in this case, whilst all are from the Tyne and Wear area, the talks cover a range of topics including;

– Prehistoric settlements found at East Wideopen and West Shiremoor in North Tyneside
– Roman industrial remains found at Dorcas Avenue in Benwell
– The Roman Wallquest Community Archaeology Project at Benwell, Wallsend (including the newly discovered Roman baths) and South Shields
– Industrial archaeology of the Newcastle Pottery found at Pottery Lane/Forth Banks, Newcastle
– Industrial Archaeology of Ambrose Crowley’s Ironworks at Swalwell in Gateshead
– Crypt Archaeology and human remains found under a former Bethel Chapel in Villiers Street, Sunderland
– World War Two and Cold War Archaeology at Blakelaw and Kenton Bunkers

To book places details are given in the poster or through clicking the link here. In a fully packed day. Jennifer notes that “Most of the archaeological projects which will be discussed have been funded by developers through the planning process, and the aim of the day is to pass on the results of these exciting excavations to local residents”.

Following on from previous emails…
1) The next Dig Deeper talk

Previous CBA North emails have announced talks on forensics and facial reconstruction, as well as osteoarchaeology, for the meetings of various groups. The next Dig Deeper talk at Durham, later this month, will discuss some of the new approaches to looking at and recording old bones – sometimes at a distance to the original samples. 

2) Bodies of Evidence: How science unearthed Durham’s dark secret
Also bone-related our last email carried information about a talk on the Scottish soldiers from the 1650 Battle of Dunbar who had died and been buried at Durham by Richard Annis, once again at Berwick to the Border Archaeological Society in April. Andrew Millard, also of Durham University and involved with the Scottish Soldiers project, has written to us a bit more about the forthcoming exhibition and events associated with that project.

He writes on behalf of the project team in an update to April’s talk with what planned for this summer;

“This exhibition shows how the latest scientific techniques have revealed the soldiers’ story – how they lived, why they died, and what became of those who survived.

Their skeletons were discovered during excavations in Durham in November 2013 and, for the first time, visitors to Palace Green Library will come face to face with a 3D reconstruction of the face of one of these men in the exhibition. The exhibition also tells the story of those survivors who were transported across the Atlantic to the edge of the known world. These men lived to have families and we are proud to have connected with many descendants, and we hope that descendants will be able to visit us and the exhibition in Durham this summer.

Running alongside the exhibition will be a programme of events, including family activities, public lectures, and the new production Woven Bones from Cap-a-Pie theatre company. The play will tell the story of the Scottish soldiers, and will tour venues along the route marched from Dunbar to Durham. Details of the production can be found on the Cap-a-Pie website.

Key highlights of this programme of events so far include:

– 18th June: Evening gallery opening with Professor Chris Gerrard, Project Lead for the Scottish Soldiers Archaeology Project
– 30th July: Evening lecture by Dr David Caldwell, President of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland
– 13th August: Evening lecture by Professor Caroline Wilkinson, Director of Face Lab, Liverpool John Moores University, which produced the facial reconstruction
– 3rd September: Evening lecture by Arran Johnston, Founding Director of the Scottish Battlefields Trust

The Scottish Soldiers Archaeology Project Team would be delighted to welcome descendants to the exhibition and would be pleased to arrange private tours with members of the Team, so please do let us know if you are planning a visit by emailing Scottish.soldiers@durham.ac.uk. We recognise that Durham is a long way to travel for many of you, and so we are developing a small sister touring exhibition which will visit venues in the United States. More information about this touring exhibition will be made available in due course.

Further details and more events will be announced soon. Visit our website to find out more about the exhibition.

A book documenting the archaeology of the discovery, the process of analysis, and the history of the Scottish soldiers, including stories of the survivors, has also been produced by the Project Team and will be available in the coming months. Visit Oxbow Books to find out more about the book here.

We hope to see you this summer.

Kind regards,

The Scottish Soldiers Archaeology Project Team & Exhibition Curatorial Team”.

Military archaeology lectures this weekend in CBA North

CBA North News

A short email to let you know of two military archaeology lectures this weekend. These include the first of the reschedulings down to the weather at the end of last month/start of this month, and also span from the Roman period (at least?) to the Modern. You’ll have to go along to find out more.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
16.03.2018

Dere Street: the archaeology of a Border Road
Those members and followers of CBA North who were at our April conference last year will remember the presentation by Chris Butterworth and David Jones of our group member Coquetdale Community Archaeology. This lecture will deal in more detail with the Borders Roads Project, and in particular Dere Street.

The excavations of the Catterick and A1 section of this route beyond our region’s southern boundarues have been covered by previous talks and events which we have sent you notice of – this lecture will look at the northern edges of our region.

A Blyth Battery talk
Members with a longer memory will remember our CBA North tour of Blyth Battery with Chris Burgess back in 2010. If you weren’t there, but are keen to learn more about this site there is a lecture in Belford on Sunday.

Further news
We’ll aim to send some more news of things past at next week from around the region. If you would like to submit anything, or indeed for the next CBA North Committee, please feel free to do so. The contributions and thoughts of all Members and Followers are most welcome at any time.

Other March events
There are still some other March events to come that we know of. These are;

17 March – Altogether Archaeology AGM and AA’s 2017 investigation of the Well Head settlement at Holwick, Upper Teesdale and Scandinavian influences in the Tees Valley, Martin Green and others, as well as Liz Ryan [ALTOGETHER]
17 March – Late Palaeolithic Rock Art at Qurta in Egypt & The Old Kingdom Settlement at El-Kab: recent excavation and fieldwork, Dr Dirk Huyge & Dr Walter Claes [NEAES]
28 March – A frontier and community in transition: the Tungrian Vindolanda, Andrew Birley [SOCANTS]

Further details are through our website pages for the groups, the times and venues of these meetings.

Further February events across CBA North

CBA North News
A quick email to update Members and Followers of two events this week – more to come later!

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee,
13.02.2018

Newcomen Society lecture: the Spadeadam space age


Durham Museum of Archaeology lecture: Bronze Age treasures

The Willington Waggonway and two conferences – events this week

CBA North News
Events continue thick and fast!

With autumn quickly changing to winter our announcements change to notices and events summarising work carried out of previous projects and this year as well. This week’s events follow that trend, so here is a reminder of two events we’ve previously noticed, as well as a third in Scotland, which might be of interest to you.

We already have details for 2018 events from some of the local groups. If you would like to send round details of your group’s events for what is the most read of our emails at the start of the year for everyone else to see, please feel free to send them on.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
13.11.2017

The Willington Waggonway

The Arbeia Society Conference

Edinburgh, Lothian and Borders Archaeology Conference
Here’s another event also happening on Saturday which might also be of interest.

The programme for this day can be found here. Online bookings can be made here.