Category Archives: E Newsletter

Our CBA North alphabet of archaeology continues: K to M

CBA North News
Our alphabet of archaeology is back covering letters K to M – with a series of M’s we have to hand. Again we cover as much of the CBA North region we can for news of interest to all Members and Followers. We start with the killing of a bull – Taurean readers “may wish to look away now” as the news sports reports start, have a quick announcement on the Lake District in case anyone missed it and also notice a further Festival of Archaeology event that covers the Mesolithic to the Medieval.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 18.07.2017

Mithras: Roman Religion from the Thames to Tyne
At the Great North Museum: Hancock, Newcastle, Members will recall we had our AGM this year – indeed seeing specially loaned exhibits associated with the Roman cavalry Turma project. Members interested in the Roman period now have another reason to visit the museum to see further specially loaned exhibits associated with the sun god Mithras, appropriate as we are now finally into the summer perhaps. Jonathan Loach of Tyne and Wear Museums has kindly provided us with both the press release and pictures detailing this exhibition.

“This exhibition runs from Saturday 1 July to Sunday 27 August. It brings together for the first time objects found in the 1950s during excavations of two important temples to the god Mithras, at Carrawburgh on Hadrian’s Wall and Walbrook in London.


The three main altars from the Carrawburgh Mithraeum © Tyne and Wear Museums

The Carrawburgh finds – owned by the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne and on show in the Great North Museum: Hancock – include three altars to Mithras as well as sculptures and religious utensils. They are joined by three exquisite marble heads of Mithras, Minerva and Serapis found at Walbrook [see at the base of today’s articles],…


Profile of a Roman marble head of Mithras © Museum of London

…and a sketch reconstruction of the interior of Carrawburgh temple by artist Alan Sorrell.

Reconstruction by Alan Sorrell of the interior of the Temple to Mithras © Museum of London

Caroline McDonald, Manager at the Great North Museum: Hancock, said:
“This is a once in a lifetime chance for anyone interested in archaeology to see these two internationally important Roman Mithras collections side by side. It’s never happened before and is not to be missed.
“I’m thrilled that we’ve been able to work with the Museum of London, my home for many years, on making this display a reality.”

Mithras was an ancient Persian god adopted in the Roman Empire as the main deity of a mystery religion that flourished in the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD. The religion was open only to men and some scholars believe its worshippers were highly secretive about their rituals and beliefs.

Mithras was both a sun god and a creator god. Iconography found in his temples often focuses on the act of creation in which Mithras kills a bull and life – in the form of ears of wheat – emerges from the slain animal’s tail. The god is frequently depicted as being born of a rock or egg, and the Great North Museum: Hancock holds a unique carving found at Housesteads Roman Fort showing the birth of Mithras from the cosmic egg.


The unique stone from Housesteads described above © Tyne and Wear Museums

Andrew Parkin, Keeper of Archaeology at the Great North Museum: Hancock, said:
“This exhibition provides us with the unique opportunity to tell the story of the worship of Mithras in Roman Britain from two different perspectives. As a god worshipped both in the provincial capital of London and on the northern frontier of Hadrian’s Wall.”

The excavations of the Mithraic temples at Carrawburgh and Walbrook in the 1950s captured the public imagination and stimulated interest in Mithras and the cult-like religion bearing his name.

The London temple was discovered during building work in 1954 and revealed the fine marble sculptures of Mithras, Minerva and Serapis. Around 400,000 visitors came to see the temple in just a fortnight and a campaign to save it was started. Even then Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill was involved in discussions about its preservation. The eventual outcome saw the temple moved to a nearby location where the public could see it.

Roy Stephenson, Head of Archaeological Collections at the Museum of London, said:
“We are delighted to be able to share these incredible sculptures with the people of the north-east of England, more especially as the collection at the Great North Museum: Hancock made such a formative impression on me as a child. I encourage everyone to go and see these important artefacts together while they can.”


The marble head of Serapis as found carefully buried under one of the floor levels of the Walbrook Mithraeum © Museum of London

By the 4th century AD, Roman Mithraism was in decline as Christianity spread across the Empire. The discovery of the heads of Mithras and Serapis at Walbrook – carefully hidden, buried underneath the temple flooring – may attest to the fact that the temple switched its worship to the god Bacchus”.

A pair of events will take place on this Friday, 21 July, at the museum in connection with this exhibition. At 12.30 there will be a gallery talk Why do Museums create imitation Mithraea? and at 17.30 there will be a public talk Staging religious experience in the Mithraeum: Mystagogues and Meanings both by Professor Richard Gordon of Erfurt University. Further details can be found here.

Additionally there is also another gallery tour on Friday, 28 July, as part of this exhibition whose details can be found here.

The Lake District as a World Heritage Site
Members and Followers will have doubtless heard or seen the news that the Lake District National Park is Britain’s newest (and 31st) World Heritage Site. Details on this can be found on the pages of the National Park here.

This now means that there are four World Heritage Sites within the CBA North region. Uniquely, at the moment, this also means that Ravenglass Roman fort and bath house are located in two World Heritage Sites. There are also four National Parks and four Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty as well – there is much happening in all of these areas. We hope to report upon something from these soon.

The Mesolithic to Medieval at Cresswell: another Festival of Archaeology Event
Members and Followers will recall that we publicised something on the fieldwork around the village and tower at Cresswell, Northumberland, earlier in the year.


Excavations underway at Cresswell Tower earlier in the year

Next week sees a talk, as another within the Festival of Archaeology, which will summarise the findings – thus far – of the project. In a surfeit of M’s for our alphabet will be present with finds from the Mesolithic to the Medieval recorded, by a further M. Barry Mead will describe all in his talk on Wednesday, 26 July, at Cresswell village hall. Details for this event are on the Festival of Archaeology pages here.

Archaeology is ACE across CBA North

CBA North News
Archaeology is ACE across CBA North! – but that, of course, is hardly news to our Members and Followers.

In this issue, however, we spell that out quite literally in an update from the Appleby Archaeology Group, a further notice of Coniston Copper with other Cumbrian Events as a first email to you with details of Festival of Archaeology events, as well as something in of a major event devoted to a single Exceptional Exhibit to be displayed at the Durham Museum of Archaeology. All are updates to pieces of work or follow-up’s on topics we have covered earlier in some way – whether in our emails or events – so perhaps this email should be titled ‘Archaeology is AAGCCCEEEE!’, but that would be a bit of a mouthful.

It is always the way perhaps? Nothing happens and then everything does, but we hope that is no bad thing. We hope that this is the first of other emails that we are going to send in quick succession and to report other news. There is so much happening at the moment across CBA North-land and if you think we should be covering something feel free to let us know what. The pictures at the bottom give you a hint of what is yet to come. Thoughts in advance for how we complete our alphabet of archaeology across CBA North for the Q, U, W, X, Y and Z gratefully received – we are working on it!

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 13.07.2017

DigAppleby: breaking the ground
Martin Joyce, Chair of the Appleby Archaeology Group, Members will recall gave us a talk at last year’s AGM in Corbridge of the group’s plans for fieldwork in 2016. Here he provides for us a 2017 update; the pictures come from the brochure mentioned below. The link for this brochure, at the bottom of the update, will take you to the full version if you would like to print a copy which can be folded up as a leaflet.

“Appleby Archaeology has just completed the first year of its multi-phase investigation into the history of Appleby. To mark the occasion we mounted an exhibition in the Tourist Information Centre in Appleby Town Hall. This has been a community project so we were keen to show the results and to feature pictures of all our volunteers in action.

The exhibition is timed to coincide with the Festival of Archaeology and will run until the end of July.

The project was very successful in capturing interest and support. Quite a few households proved keen to offer their back-gardens as test-pit sites. Our palaeography courses also proved very popular and we were lucky to be able to gain access to a variety of documents that revealed life in Medieval Appleby in a surprisingly vivid and immediate way.

A full report on the first year is available on our website at DigAppleby – Breaking the Ground.

This is a bit technical so we also produced a small colour brochure introducing and describing the work in more popular terms, that could be given away free by the Tourist Information Centre”.

DigAppleby’s project blog, including pictures of the display, can be found online here, and details of the Appleby Archaeology Group more generally through our own CBA North website pages.

Coniston Copper and other Cumbrian Events
Saturday sees the launch of this year’s Festival of Archaeology events all across the country and across CBA North-land as well from 15 to 30 July this year. There are a number of events covering topics that we’ve previous carried notice of – you will doubtless recall the picture below that we sent to you earlier in the year of the Coniston Copper mines sent to us by Penny Middleton of Northern Archaeological Associates.

If you didn’t get involved in the fieldwork project an event, as part of the Festival of Archaeology, is being held on Saturday 15 July at the Coniston Boating Centre between 11.00 and 15.30 as part of a mining heritage day. Further details can be found online here where further opportunities to get involved in fieldwork are also listed.

Other Cumbrian events can for the Festival of Archaeology can be found on this page, as well as for elsewhere.

The Lanchester Diploma: Britain’s first named sailor
Durham’s Museum of Archaeology also leads the charge of events for this year’s Festival of Archaeology. For those of you that weren’t at our AGM this year to hear about the Portable Antiquities Scheme, you have a chance to learn some more of the scheme – perhaps also have any of your finds identified as well – on Saturday with this event.

Such a find, indeed an exceptional one, which was reported to the Portable Antiquities Scheme is the Lanchester diploma. Gemma Lewis of the Durham Museum of Archaeology has sent us details of an event relating this new exhibit for the museum. There are a few finds that really change what we know beyond their immediate surroundings  – this is one of them, and on first hearing of this the word “Blimey!” came to mind.

If you would like to attend the event on Thursday 20 July then please email archaeology.museum@durham.ac.uk.

A further event will also be held at the Museum on Saturday 29 July as well when the Roma Antiqua re-enactment group will be present between 11.00 and 15.00 to demonstrate the lives and skills of Roman soldiers. Further details on this event can be found here.

A pair of lectures this week

CBA North News
A short email to say that we haven’t forgotten about CBA North’s Member and Followers over the summer. Committee Members, as ever, have been full of busy gathering news and talking with contacts on behalf of the group and you our members.

Whilst some groups have stopped their lectures for a summer break or perhaps fieldwork, we have continued to add information to our Events pages as they have become known to us. Please let us know of your events at any time so we can publicise to others – if you would like to submit something we’ve some draft technical notes for contributors which outline what our various communication methods will and will not allow (and guinea-pigs for these are sought) Increasingly we are hearing of 2018 events, but there are plenty 2017 events yet to come – indeed, there are two this week as it is.

At Stockton tonight and Newcastle tomorrow are two lectures we’ve publicised earlier in that Events page. These are Pons Aelius to Pandon by Jennifer Morrison as the Teesside Archaeological Society lecture and Romano-British glass bangles: a reappraisal as The Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne lecture by Tatiana Ivleva respectively.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 27.06.2017

On Salt and Scottish soldiers: a pair of lectures this week

CBA North News
Today’s email title sounds like the cabbages and kings of the walrus in Lewis Carroll’s The Jabberwocky, but it is so this week. There are a pair of two lectures that we know about this week – both at the northern edge of our CBA North region. But both have stories to tell beyond their immediate area and internationally so.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 05.06.2017

Salt
The next lecture of the Border Archaeological Society lecture is tonight at 7.30pm at Berwick Parish Church Hall, Berwick, on The Needles Eye Enclosure: salt production in the Late Iron Age by Jenny Proctor. This important site was partly excavated to reveal an extensive, and well dated, settlement dating from the late 4th century BC to the Romano-British period.

The arch of Needles Eye north of Berwick
Photo © Phil Catterall (cc-by-sa/2.0)

The site takes its name from the Needles Eye rock arch in the cliffs shown above. The excavation of this site currently provides the most northerly evidence of salt production in prehistoric Britain, but more regional links with the Cheviots are also hinted at. All will be explained tonight.

Scottish Soldiers
Also this week is the next lecture of the Till Valley Archaeological Society which is also at 7.30pm at Crookham Village Hall, though this is on the Wednesday night.

This talk will also highlight further national – and indeed international – links of events that happened in our local area. We’ve covered earlier some of the earlier events on these soldiers at Durham. Further information on this project, and the range of work carried out, can now also be found here.

Details for both groups can be found through the Local Societies and Groups page of our website.

Our CBA North alphabet of archaeology continues: G to J

CBA North News
A short email today for CBA North’s Members – behind the scenes we are working on a summary of our work for you and of our own recent events in Summarising and Sustaining Conference, as the well as our AGM. You will see various changes taking place on the website and to these emails in time.

Nonetheless normal business continues as General work and we’ve notice of two events this week below – one of which is tonight. Nonetheless our alphabet of CBA North archaeology continues and today covers from G to J.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 30.05.2017

The Teesside Archaeological Society lecture tonight
The next lecture of our group member the Teesside Archaeological Society is tonight on the Durham University Stockton Campus in D004 – please note the change in venue this time round. Whilst talking in the south-east of our region Dr David Petts will describing about his recent work in the north-east of our region; his subject Lindisfarne and the Holy Island Archaeology Project. This lecture begins at 7.30 pm.

Details on the group can be found through the Local Societies and Groups page of our website. This gives us an H and I for our CBA North alphabet.

Also this week – The Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne lecture
Tomorrow night also sees a lecture as well. The Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle have a lecture by Andrew Breeze on the Battle of Brunanburh and Cambridge CCC, MS 183. This lecture will be at 6pm at the Mining Institute in Newcastle. Once again details can be found on our website.

Looking ahead to June
Here is a list of June’s events that we know of so far;

5 June – Needles Eye, Jenny Proctor [BAS]
7 June – Durham and Dunbar: identifying Scottish soldiers at Palace Green, Richard Annis [TILLVAS]
27 June – Pons Aelius to Pandon, Jennifer Morrison [TAS]

28 June – Romano-British glass bangles: a reappraisal, Tatiana Ivleva [SOCANTS]

Please let us know if you are organising any other events that you would like CBA North to promote. Details for each of these societies, such as their meeting places and times, can be found in the Local Societies and Groups of our website.

Our CBA North alphabet of archaeology continues: C and D, E and F

CBA North News
Today we have a range of items of interest for you. Again we continue through the alphabet  of archaeology across our region with C and D, E and F with a mix of Cresswell, Dogs, Egypt and Excavations, notice of a Forum and also of Fieldwork reported. We also look ahead to the Festival of Archaeology as well.

No less important we also remind you below of three other letters – A, G and M. Our AGM is on Saturday 20 May in Newcastle this year. Committee have noted the discussions from our recent Conference/Workshop and this gives us a chance to discuss in more detail our work – past, present and future – for you and your group.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 12.05.2017

CBA North AGM 2017 – a reminder
Our AGM is on Saturday 20 May 2017. If you haven’t booked up, or let us know of your apologies and instructions, please do so as soon as possible. This is your chance to hear of the work that Committee have been involved with on your behalf at local, regional and national meetings, as well as your chance to help in our aims and direction for the future. If you wish to raise anything please do so by the end of this week. We are especially keen that our group members to send representatives along.

We had various comments for a ‘resource bank’ at our conference/workshop in April, as well as more generally, and will look to discuss this and CBA North’s role into the future at this meeting.

The meeting is not all business however. The day gives you the chance to network and update other members of news, as well as hear a talk on the Portable Antiquities Scheme – in its 20th anniversary year – as well as participate in special tours of the Great North Museum: Hancock.

If you have had problems printing or returning the booking form sent through the emails, please let us know (including for any apologies and instructions in your absence) by emailing us at cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org.

The booking form is available on our website home page as a .pdf and also as a .doc file if you find it easier to use those versions. The deadline for any business from the floor to be considered is Saturday.

Cresswell Tower Excavations – an update
Philippa Hunter, formerly Cockburn, of Archaeological Research Services has sent us this update of work whose open-day we publicised earlier this year.

“The Cresswell Pele Tower Project is led by Cresswell Parish Council and the Greater Morpeth Development Trust. The aim of this Heritage Lottery Funded project is to remove the tower (see below) from the Historic England Heritage at Risk Register and to provide public access to the tower. This aim will be met while also providing volunteer opportunities and public engagement activities. The programme of archaeological work includes geophysical survey, fieldwalking, archaeological evaluation trenching, building survey, watching brief and archival research.


The pele tower with excavations, and excavators, in the foreground.

 

Cresswell Pele Tower represents a well-preserved example of a border tower house or ‘pele’ and is believed to date to the 14th or 15th century. In the 18th century a large mansion house was constructed adjoining the tower, but was later demolished. The tower now stands on the edge of a caravan park where it has been the target of vandals in recent years.

 

A two-week archaeological evaluation followed geophysical survey and fieldwalking in February 2017. The evaluation was conducted within Fisheries Field, to the east and south of the pele tower, and in the immediate vicinity of the pele tower itself. The evaluation aimed to identify and assess any archaeological features within these areas. A total of nine evaluation trenches were excavated within Fisheries Field and revealed evidence of Mesolithic flint knapping activity, Bronze Age burials and medieval ploughing.


The remains of an earlier building – a wall foundation and cobbled floor surface

A further three, hand-dug trenches were opened up around the tower. These trenches produced important new evidence for buried archaeological remains including an earlier building than the tower consisting of a cobbled floor surface and a rough but substantial wall foundation (see above). Medieval pottery dating from the 12th -14th centuries was also recovered supporting the structural evidence for occupation on the site pre-dating the pele tower”.

Philippa Hunter

Full reports of the work carried out, so far, can be found on the project’s website pages here. These reports include further details of the varied fieldwork, locations around Cresswell and also of the many of the finds recovered.

Further work is planned, as well as a talk on Wednesday 26 July at Cresswell Village Hall by Barry Mead as part of the Festival of Archaeology events across the north and indeed across the country.

The Dogs of Ancient Egypt
Our further letters of the alphabet come from the North East Ancient Egypt Society’s meeting. The cats of Ancient Egypt are well-known generally, but this talk deals with the dogs.

Other Events this weekend
Other events this weekend also include the AGM of our group member the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland at Shildon, near Darlington, the Tyne and Wear Heritage Forum’s second conference at Wallsend Memorial Hall (places are still available from here) for our F which includes details of the CITiZAN project whose fieldwork we covered last year (pictured below), as well as CBA National’s Member’s Weekend which is based on Tyneside this year.

We’ll have more on Festival of Archaeology events in further emails to you. We are particularly keen to promote the work of groups across our region, especially to those unable to make our April event. Please feel free to let us know of your future events.

CBA North’s next event: AGM 2017

CBA North News
Hard on the heels of our Conference/Workshop ‘Summarising and Sustaining’ yesterday, we have notice of our own AGM below.

Our thanks to all the speakers and audience at yesterday’s event, as well as to our hosts the Department of Archaeology, Newcastle University, for the day. We hope everyone enjoyed the day. It has given us plenty to think on for the AGM and we would like to continue on the afternoon’s discussions on to take forward the many thoughts and comments made. Some comments have already been made to our Twitter account @CBANorth and we welcome further ones from those there and, unfortunately, unable to attend.

It is again hoped that as many of our members and group members can attend these events as possible – we are the regional group for archaeological groups and individuals. Though across the North and with many interests, groups and sectors across the archaeological and historical world and ourselves, we are all interested in the past. Again details, and the booking forms, can be found on our website in the page AGM 2017.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee, 30.04.2017

Council for British Archaeology North AGM 2017 – announcement

                                                                               Council for British Archaeology North
                                                                     c/o The Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle
                                                                                        Great North Museum: Hancock
                                                                                                                     Barras Bridge
                                                                                                        Newcastle upon Tyne
                                                                                                                             NE2 4PT
29 April 2017
Dear CBA North Members,

Re: Notice of CBA North Annual General Meeting, Saturday 20 May 2017

I am writing to give you the formal notice of our Annual General Meeting which will be from 10.30am on Saturday 20 May 2017. This will be in the Council Room of the Great North Museum: Hancock, Barras Bridge, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4PT (see https://greatnorthmuseum.org.uk/ for more). We will have notices to indicate the way.
 
Business will begin promptly at 10.30am. The agenda is given below. A summary of the 2016 AGM will be available on our website soon and an email sent out drawing your attention to this new addition once online. Please print out the booking form below (also available on our website) to confirm your attendance, or send apologies in, for this meeting.

Currently there are vacancies and gaps in the coverage of issues by Committee due to changes in position, location and work of current members. Some gaps are long-standing, others newer. If you are interested in covering the academic or commercial sectors, maritime/nautical archaeology, museums, and making links to the Young Archaeologists Clubs and other youth groups for us, we would urge you to get involved or nominate people that committee can approach to co-opt this year.

Nevertheless CBA North Committee, as at any other time, welcome thoughts on what you think CBA North should be doing during 2017. If you would like to raise an issue at the AGM please let us know at least seven days before the meeting.

Our AGM takes a different form this year. Previously we invited local archaeological groups to report upon their past and planned activities (though only a few took up this offer). As the AGM is hot on the heels of our Conference/Workshop, we will discussing that day and how we can take things forward from that. The morning business will be followed by a talk from Andrew Agate and Ben Westwood, recently appointed Finds Liaison Officers covering the eastern side of our region, who will deal with their Portable Antiquities Scheme-based work.

We will then break for lunch before reconvening at 2.00pm for tours of our venue. These will be led by Andrew Parkin, a curator at the museum, for a behind the scenes tour of the museum, and Howard Cleeve, Hon. Assistant Librarian, The Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne, who will give an introduction to the Society’s collection in the library.

I would be most grateful if you could let me know whether you will be attending the meeting. Please print, complete both parts and return the booking form so it reaches me by Saturday 13 May 2017 at the very latest.

Yours sincerely,

Keith Elliott, Secretary, CBA North

Council for British Archaeology North AGM 2017 Agenda
Registered Charity Number 1098854

NOTICE is hereby given of the Annual General Meeting of the Charity to be held at Great North Museum: Hancock, Barras Bridge, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4PT on Saturday 20 May 2017 at 10.30 am precisely for the following purposes:

1          to receive and consider the final accounts for the year ended 31 March 2017
2          to receive and consider the annual report for the year ended 31 March 2017
3          to have a discussion on the CBA North event Summarising and Sustaining
4          in the notification of new CBA North committee members
5          CBA North Advocacy
6          any other business notified to the Chairman at least seven days in advance of the                           meeting or business from the floor
 
By order of the committee
                                                                                                Richard Forster
                                                                                                CBA North Chair
                                                                                                Dated 29 April 2017

1. Any member of the charity aged 18 and over is entitled to vote at the AGM. Organisational members are entitled to one vote and should appoint a representative to vote on their behalf.

2. Any member of the charity aged 18 and over who is entitled to attend, speak and vote at the above mentioned meeting may appoint a proxy to attend, speak and, on a poll, vote instead of that member. A proxy need not be a member of the charity.

Council for British Archaeology North AGM 2017 – booking form


Please return this booking form by 13 May 2017!

Booking form:
Name/s: ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
Address: ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
Telephone: ………………………. Email address: ……………………………………………………………………………… 

Morning session:
Please indicate clearly ALL those of the following that apply to you or your group:
 

  • I/we will be attending the CBA North AGM on 20 May 2017 (if for a group member please say which that you will be representing) ……………………………………………………………………………….………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
  • I/we will not be attending the CBA North AGM on 20 May 2017 and wish to nominate the Chair as my proxy.
  • I/we will not be attending the CBA North AGM on 20 May 2017 and wish to nominate ………………………………………………………………………. as my proxy

 

  • I/we will not be attending the CBA North AGM on 20 May 2017 and do not wish to nominate a proxy.

 
Afternoon session:
Please indicate clearly ALL those of the following that apply to you or your group by giving the number of places you would like. (If there is a large attendance then we will divide the group into two which will take alternate turns for both tours):
 

  • I/we would like to attend the behind the scenes tour of the GNM: Hancock on the afternoon of 20 May 2017 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
  • I/we would like to attend the tour of The Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne’s library on the afternoon of 20 May 2017 ……………………………………………………………………………….

Please return your completed booking form by 13 May 2017 by:

email to cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org

post to CBA North, C/o The Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne, Great North Museum: Hancock, Barras Bridge, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4PT

We have the booking form available on the website page as a .pdf here CBA North Booking Form, 20.05.2017 and also as a .doc file CBA North Booking Form, 20.05.2017 if you find it easier to use those versions to reply.