Creative archaeology – November in CBA North-land

CBA North News

We apologise for the lateness of this issue in reaching you, but hope that the up to the minute information below is some recompense. In answer to our earlier question for a collective noun of Roman conferences we were quite taken for a “Convivium” suggested by Dave Barter, one of our many Twitter Followers.

This time the theme is ‘creation’ with notice of a recent publication, of objects from Neolithic stone axes to Victorian stained glass within the local group lectures, and the creation of our shared archaeological heritage in the construction of Hadrian’s Wall itself, the development of archaeology from antiquarianism (with reference to ‘The Wall’) as well as for a World Heritage Site and its own unique challenges.

We are gathering materials reviewing the year from local groups – if you would like to send in what your group has been up to please do – as well as looking ahead to 2017 (we already have the programmes of three local groups). These emails tend to be the most widely read, and circulated, of the year (420+ that read the email, whilst 300 viewed the website events page one day and the Twitter notice was circulated to over 16000). So it is well worth a quick note to promote your work to us, everyone else of the other local groups and members of no affiliation other than to CBA North as well.

You could be out almost everyday this week at one or other event that we’ve listed for you here!

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
06.11.2016

Northern Archaeology
The Northumberland Archaeological Group (NAG) have recently published a volume of their journal Northern Archaeology in memory of Ian Colquhoun, well-known regionally and internationally as an expert for the Bronze Age, in particular of metalwork and specifically swords.

This contains a range of articles which CBA North Members and followers might be interested in – two cover Bronze Age swords with one written by Ian from his MA thesis on the findspots of Northumbrian Bronze Age swords and one with a member of his lifelong learning group on a single sword from near Durham. An obituary of Ian and bibliography of his publications are also included.
The results of two landscape surveys on the moors of Hexhamshire and near Chatton, and an article on Northumbrian stone circles, complete the volume. This can be bought for £12, whilst back numbers of the journal containing a range of articles – not just on Northumbrian archaeological sites or finds – can also be bought by non-members at a range of prices.

Contact details for NAG, as well as the contents of previous volumes of Northern Archaeology, can be found through these links for their website and Facebook pages.

Events this month
Below the usual listing of all the regular local group lectures still to come this month that we know of. Please let us know an additions to the list to let everyone else know.

7 November – Pagan Viking Burial in Scotland, Dr Colleen Batey [BAS]
9 November – Annual General Meeting and Grimes Graves and the Neolithic Flint Mines of the UK, Pete Topping [NAG]
10 November – Recent excavations at Vindolanda, Marta Alberti [APPLEBY]
12 November – Light without Morris: alternative perspectives on Victorian stained glass, Dr Neil Moat [ARCH & ARCH]
12 November – The Arbeia Society Conference: ‘An Exceptional Construction’: the building of Hadrian’s Wall [ARBEIA]
26 November – Annual Study Day and AGM: The Theban West Bank Tombs: new Research and Directions [NEAES]

The Birley Lectures
The creation of the archaeological past is to be covered in this lecture on Tuesday. All are invited to hear Durham’s own Professor Richard Hingley at this lecture – one of a new series – at Durham.

Durham WHS 30th Events
Also in Durham, though on Wednesday night, is another lecture on the creation of heritage. Like others in the series we’ve publicised earlier in the year this lecture will also cover the challenges – in this case for an area even more remote than the remotest parts of CBA North.
We, of course, cover have two World Heritage Sites – Durham Castle and Cathedral is one, whilst Hadrian’s Wall is part of the Frontiers of the Roman Empire as the other. Might we yet cover a third in the Lake District in 2017?

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