Monthly Archives: February 2016

Humans in Ancient Britain micro-exhibition

The Great North Museum: Hancock, in Newcastle, is shortly going to have a micro-exhibition about Humans in Ancient Britain with material on loan from the Natural History Museum, which includes the Swanscombe Neanderthal skull between 24 February  and 7 April.

William King had been a curator at the museum and responsible for naming Neanderthals as a separate species, so especially appropriate for this exhibition. Related to the exhibition are a pair of evening talks and pair of family events based around local collections and Palaeolithic Britain in March and April.

Free Evening Talk at the Great North Museum: Hancock
Tuesday 22 March 2016, 18.30
‘Professor William King’s fossil bones and shells: The scientific legacy of a Geordie in Galway!’
Prof. David Harper
Professor of Palaeontology and Principal of Van Mildert College at Durham University

William King was the first person to name a separate species of human when he gave the species name Homo neanderthalensis to Neanderthals at the British Association for the Advancement of Science meeting at Newcastle in 1863. He was a self-educated man from Sunderland who became curator of the Newcastle Museum (later the Hancock Museum) and then a Professor of Geology and Mineralogy at Queen’s College, Galway. King was a controversial figure, both locally, where he fell out with his employers at the Museum, and nationally as part of the debate on evolution and anthropology.  Professor Harper’s talk explores King’s life and legacy.

Please book in advance.  Tickets are free and available from: https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/date/234953

Free Evening Talk at the Great North Museum: Hancock
Wednesday 6 April 2016, 18.30
‘Palaeolithic Britain: one-million years of human prehistory’
Prof. Mark White
Professor in the Department of Archaeology at Durham University

Mark White is a specialist in the Palaeolithic (the Old Stone Age) of Britain and its near neighbours.  He has worked on many of the key sites of early human occupation in Britain and also has an interest in the Victorian antiquarians who first excavated some of these locations.  His talk will follow the early occupation of Britain and the evidence we have about people who have lived here over the last million years.

Please book in advance.  Tickets are free and available from: https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/date/234941

Free Family Activity Day
Thursday 31 March 11 – 3
Collectors Day

A day where we take William King, the former curator of this museum who named Neanderthals as a separate species, as the springboard to thinking about other local collectors. This day will include contributions from amongst others our own curators plus the Natural History Society of Northumbria, the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne.

Free Family Activity Day
Thursday 7 April 11 – 3,
Neanderthal Thursday

with support from archaeologists from Durham University (tbc), the opportunity to discover our collection of human evolution skull replicas and a hand silhouette cave art activity.

For further information contact;
Dr Kate Holden
Assistant Learning Officer
Great North Museum: Hancock
Barras Bridge
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE2 4PT
0191 208 7578

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Newcastle University Roman Archaeology Seminar – tonight

The next of the Newcastle University Roman Archaeology Evening Seminars is tonight!

We at CBA North have been sent the poster for tonight’s talk by James Gerrard and Andrew Agate of Newcastle University. Details of the talk “Between Three Towns: The Lufton Roman Villa in the Longue Duree” can be found here.

As before this takes place in the Armstong Building of Newcastle University, and as before a map can be found on at this webpage.

Gertrude Bell and the ‘Woman Question’

Helen Berry, Professor of British History, Newcastle University

This lecture is part of the Newcastle University Insights lecture series.

Admission is free with no pre-booking required.

Date: 23rd February 2016

Time: 17:30 – 18:45

Venue: Curtis Auditorium, Herschel Building

Newcastle University holds an extraordinary and unique archive of letters, diaries and photographs belonging to Gertrude Bell, one of the most remarkable women of the 20th century. A contemporary of T E Lawrence (‘Lawrence of Arabia’), until recently Bell has been little known beyond the specialist world of Middle Eastern archaeology, and yet her legacy is significant: for example, she played a major role in the political settlement that led to the formation of modern-day Iraq. In conjunction with the launch of a major exhibition about Bell at the Great North Museum: Hancock, this lecture will explore the paradoxes and contradictions in Gertrude Bell’s life from the perspective of women’s history.

TillVAS Village Atlas Project

On Saturday, February 20th 10am – 12 noon at Branxton Village Hall, there will be an opportunity to see the maps, photographs, and documents at the Branxton Road Show of the Till Valley Archaeological Society (TillVAS) Village Atlas Project which project members have collected.

If you live, or have lived, in Branxton, or if you ever had family living there or are simply interested in the history of a Northumberland village which dates back centuries you might be interested in this event.

There is no charge to attend the event. Refreshments will be available and all are welcome.

This project is one of those sponsored by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Roman Archaeology Open Seminars, Newcastle University

CBA North members are invited to attend, if they so wish, the Roman Archaeology Open Seminars series at Newcastle University on Tuesday evenings. This time round they cover topics from carvings on Hadrian’s Wall, the stone heads common across CBA North’s region to Somerset in Britain, and further away again in talks on Gaul and beyond to North Africa.

Details of speakers and their topics can be found in the programme.

These are held on the first floor of the Armstrong Building in the university (opposite the Royal Victoria Infirmary). A directions map for those unfamiliar with the layout of Newcastle University or Newcastle more generally can be found, and downloaded, from here.

A quick reminder – Coquetdale tonight, CITiZAN tomorrow and Durham Saturday

A quick reminder of the events still to come this week – in addition to the Lunesdale Archaeology Society and Appleby Archaeology Group lectures last night and on Monday night – are that it is the first of the Coquetdale Community Archaeology Group lectures on their recent fieldwork tonight, then the Northumberland Archaeological Group lecture on the CITiZAN project tomorrow and the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland on Saturday with their details attached here.

Details for all the organisations involved, and of their websites and meeting venues, can be found at our Local Societies and Groups page.

Thereafter we have a bit of a lull in our list of regular local society events here till the 23rd. As ever please let us know of any additions or amendments – you might know about something, but someone else perhaps interested in it might not!

AKE/09.02.2016