Monthly Archives: February 2016

Creating Places of Commemoration in Viking Age Scandinavia

On Thursday afternoon there is an archaeology seminar that might be of interest to CBA North members. This, like the Roman Archaeology Seminar Series, will be held in the Department of Archaeology, Newcastle University, in the Armstrong Building.

Unlike the Roman Seminar this will be held in Room 2.16 on Thursday at 1600 when Julie Lund of the University of Oslo will talk on Relating to Pasts and Creating Places of Commemoration in Viking Age Scandinavia.

Everyone is invited to attend if you so wish, with the location of the seminar indicated, as before, from this webpage.

The Vikings are coming!

This week the Vikings are coming to the CBA North region!

There are two events on Vikings this week across the CBA North region.

On Wednesday our group member the Till Valley Archaeological Society (TillVAS) will be hearing Kristian Pedersen speak on “Vikings in the North Atlantic” at Crookham Village Hall in Northumberland.

On the following day there is a Newcastle University Archaeology Department Seminar when Julie Lund will be speak on “Relating to Pasts and Creating Places of Commemoration in Viking Age Scandinavia” in the Armstrong Building of Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne. Further details of that will follow this post in a minute or two.

In the meantime the Northumberland Archaeological Group (NAG) – the newest group member of CBA North – will be also having their March lecture on Wednesday night as well. This will be on something totally different to the Vikings when Marco Romeo Pitone will be talking about “Experimental Archaeometallurgy in Early-Middle Bronze Age Cyprus” in their lecture at the Newcastle Arts Centre, on Westgate Road, Newcastle upon Tyne.

Over to you to take your choice,

AKE/29.02.2016

Were the Trypillia mega-sites the first cities in Europe?

A quick reminder of that one of the regular local society events to come in the next week is the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland’s lecture by Professor John Chapman and Dr. Bisserka Gaydarska on Saturday afternoon with a poster of the details attached here.

An abstract for the lecture notes:

“It is now recognised that Trypillia mega-sites of the Ukraine and Moldova were the largest settlements in 4th millennium BC Europe – the largest as big as the first Near Eastern cities. The first 40 years of investigation of the Trypillia mega-sites (1971 – 2011) gave an understanding of broad planning principles but also provided exaggerated site sizes, little detail on intra-site grouping and no indication of intra-site phasing. After five years of intensive, inter-disciplinary, international projects, the key questions for current mega-site studies now focus round the problematic relationship between the huge size of the mega-sites and the complete absence so far of any materialisation of social differentiation. Could it be that long-term, all-year-round, permanent occupation by a huge urban population is the wrong model for mega-sites?”

This lecture will answer will answer the title of this email, as well answer the question above from using a range of evidence  to provide fresh answers on the site.

Details for the ‘Arch & Arch’ can be found at our Local Societies and Groups page, as well as their 2016 programme in our events here.

As ever please let us know of any further events – you might know about something, but someone else perhaps interested in it might not!

AKE/27.02.2016

Sadberge Village Trail – a meeting next week

A meeting will be held next week at Sadberge Village Hall, at 7pm, next week on 3 March 2016 to discuss plans for a history trail through the village. Sadberge, near Darlington, is well known for its history including Cade’s Road (a Roman road) which runs through the area, as well as being the centre of a wapentake (an unusual land-holding) which for many years was not part of County Durham proper.

Proposals are being put forward to document its heritage on wooden boards along a special trail. Although Sadberge’s ancient history is fairly well documented, less is known about life in the village in the early 1900s and the organisers behind the trail are keen to receive items and information from residents that can be referred to on the history boards.

For further information, contact Millie Scaife on 01325-332020.

Teesside Archaeological Society lecture – this week

Morning Everyone,

This is just a reminder that the next Teesside Archaeological Society lecture will take place on Tuesday 23rd Feb 7.30 at Stockton Central Library.

This will be ‘St Cuthbert’s Corpse’ by Dr. David Williams

Writing under the pen name David Willem, David is the author of ‘St Cuthbert’s Corpse – a life after death’. In this talk, David will draw upon research for this book, charting the history of St. Cuthbert’s body through time. His coffin was opened six times in 1300 years and on each occasion someone kept a record of the body and relics as they were found – Anglo-Saxon monks, the first kings of all England, the Normans, Henry VIII’s henchman, a Georgian antiquarian and Victorian scholars – all bringing different preoccupations and concerns to the same body of material.

Anyone can come along and it is only £4.00 for non-members. If you would like to join and you haven’t joined for this year, it is £14.00 for a single membership and £23.00 for a joint! That will cover you this year on fieldwork, all the lectures and the annual bulletin which is now ready for you all!

Looking forward to seeing you all there,
Best wishes,

Dave
TAS Chairman

2016 County Durham Archaeology Day

Tickets can now be booked for the 2016 County Durham Archaeology Day which will be on Saturday March 12th, 2016.

If you would like to book tickets please fill in the form and return it as soon as possible after Monday February 22nd when the tickets go on sale. Please pay by cheque made out to “Durham County Council”.

Yours faithfully,
County Durham Archaeology Team

MAST Remembrance Project – Volunteers needed!

The Maritime Archaeological Sea Trust has announced the launch of their Heritage Lottery Fund Remembrance Pilot Project. This project will focus on World War One and Two underwater heritage off our coast. The United Kingdom has the largest and most significant collection of World War wrecks of anywhere in the world and the seas off CBA North’s region are well represented.

The focus of this pilot will be the north-east coast. The Project aims to train, facilitate and encourage diving groups to record these wrecks. In addition the Project will also train 10 non-divers to carry out research online and in archives complementary to the divers work underwater allowing the two strands of evidence to be combined. In Northumberland the work of the volunteers in the archives will be run by the Northumberland Archives Service.

Anyone interested in volunteering to undertake the research and archive work should contact Jessica Turner, Historic and Built Environment Officer at the Northumberland Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, on 01670 622 648 or email her through the details here.