Natural History Society of Northumbria lecture: Quaternary Fluvial Archives: a new paradigm

On Friday 29 January, 7pm-8pm, at the Great North Museum: Hancock in Newcastle, Professor Dave Bridgeland will lecture on work over the past few decades which has pulled together geological and geomorphological records from rivers in the Quaternary Period that show interesting patterns of similarity and difference, which can be related to climate, its zonation and fluctuation, and to crustal provinces. Quaternary ice ages have influenced our landscape far beyond the immediate reach of the ice sheets themselves.

David Bridgland is a Professor in the Department of Geography at Durham University, with research interests in Quaternary environmental change and fluvial history, with reference to palaeontology and archaeology. Until recently he was President of the Geologist’s Association.

The lectures of the Natural History Society of Northumbria are usually held every Friday evening, starting at 7pm, in the learning suite on the ground floor of the Great North Museum: Hancock. The museum is closed to the public at this time, so entry is via both side entrances.

Entry is from 6.20pm and tea, coffee and biscuits are available and the opportunity to socialise. Speakers give an illustrated presentation for 45mins-1 hour and then open the floor for questions and discussions.

Non-members are very welcome to attend but we ask that they kindly make a donation on the night to support these lectures. Further details of the lecture programme can be found at http://www.nhsn.ncl.ac.uk/activities-ttea.php.

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