CBA North: July edition (Festival of Archaeology and more)

CBA North News

Dear Members and Friends of CBA North,

As we sure you are all well aware and need no reminding these are unprecedented times. International and national events, as well as regional and local ones, have been cancelled and postponed across the CBA North region. We hope that you, yours and your groups all are well, and continue to remain so, as we all are somewhat confined in our actions.

Many practices, procedures and pieces of work have changed and changed again in the current circumstances – several drafts of CBA North email news have been started since the end of March only to be changed and changed again as the situation has changed. Opening hours, hours of work and staff changes, however, have all been thrown into sharp focus for all of us. In a sobering article Marta Alberti of The Vindolanda Trust explains what is happening at Vindolanda in what had been planned as its 50th anniversary year. There are ways that you can help the trust and others again as lockdown arrangements ease.

However other work continues on – just in different forms and often in different locations to normal. The CBA Festival of Archaeology is one such change, with its many digital offerings starting on Saturday for its first appearance this year and details of this are below. Some groups within the CBA North network have started to hold digital lectures, whilst others continue to produce their own normal (and indeed extra) newsletters and emails for members. Quizzes and other digital content has been seen again. Gill Goodfellow of the West Cumbria Archaeology Society has sent an article in linking across to digital content which all can access, whilst CBA National and others have put more (or made more freely available) content online given the general inaccessibility of some libraries and archives.

Some groups are also using the time to plan, as well as revise websites and website pages for the future, for a newer normal. It is heartening to see such activity, productivity and continued interests in archaeology, history and heritage in these unusual times. There is so much digital content online to make choices is invidious, but if something stands out for you or you wish to publicise something please let us know so we all can enjoy it.

CBA North has been full of busy behind the scenes as well – our apologies for not being outwardly busy to you as members. Committee has met twice by email to discuss various matters, new members – including a new group member (TillVAS whose many activities we’ve often publicised in our emails to you) – have joined our number since our last email to you. Queries regarding membership, of and from our previous publications as well as general archaeology been answered for students and home-schoolers. Virtual meetings, updating and work with other regional and national bodies have also been done regarding what happening across the CBA North region with our regional overview.

Please join in us welcoming all our new members. Feel free to circulate this email and its links to non-members, and around your local group’s membership – this can be done through the ‘Forward to a friend’ link in the side bar and/or the website version of this email. Who knows they too may be also interested in joining our number?

Feedback, questions and/or comments most welcome at any time – either direct or through your local group representatives – to us; this is your group after all. A fresh survey, prompted by Covd-19, from CBA National asks what help and support your local groups need. CBA North is also taking stock and considering the future as well for our next five year plan, so we all would be most grateful if you would contribute your thoughts to the survey.

Best wishes – stay safe and well, we’ll be back with some more news soon,

CBA North Committee
10.07.2020

CBA National news
1) Festival of Archaeology 2020

This year’s festival comes in two parts, and the first of those start on Saturday.

Over 100 events and activities over the next 9 days

From 11-19 July 2020, the CBA is trying something new – a digital Festival of Archaeology
 
With live events on hold at the moment, we decided not to cancel our usual summer programme of archaeology events, but instead stage an online festival of interactive talks, competitions, youth activities and other engaging archaeology content.   

We were unsure whether people would be willing to join us in trying something brand new at short notice, but the response has been astonishing. There are now over 100 events listed on the festival website – something for every archaeology lover to enjoy, and lots more for curious minds to discover. 

We would be delighted to see you there. Here are just a few of the highlights:

Launch event – Saturday 11 July

Join the Council for British Archaeology as we launch the 2020 Festival of Archaeology with a day of online activity.

There are four free interactive online sessions – register now! Join Time Team’s Phil Harding as he takes you on a tour of Wessex Archaeology’s environmental laboratory, learn about the domestication of plants, find out how to make amazing 3D models and join our student careers session to discover routes to studying and working in archaeology. 

Alex Langlands: Digitally reconstructing excavations at Old Sarum – 12 July
Frustrated at not being able to get out and excavate this year? So is archaeoogist and TV presenter Alex Langlands. Join Alex as he digitally reconstructs the 1912 and 1913 excavations of Old Sarum’s cathedral site. Register now.

Podcast Sunday Chat – Archaeology and the Climate Change Conundrum – 19 July
Tune in for a chat on the impacts of climate change on archaeology with our hosts Career in Ruins. Guests Caroline Barrie-Smith (CITiZAN), Neil Redfern (CBA), Hannah Fluck (HE) and Rachel Bynoe (University of Southampton) present a fantastic perspective in this discussion on where archaeology stands in the climate change crisis debate. Podcast will appear here.

The campaigns of Septimius Severus in the far north of Britain – 14 July
Dr Simon Elliott, one of the world’s leading experts on the Severan campaigns in modern Scotland looks at the failed campaigns of Septimius Severus in AD 209 and AD 210. Register now.

Bacon Sandwiches and Stonehenge: Connecting Local Youth with Heritage Sites – 16 July
This live discussion will focus on how heritage sites can best support local youth organisations, and examine the ‘Our Stones’ documentary film project led by young people from Durrington Youth at Stonehenge in 2019. Register now.

An Archaeological Safari into No Man’s Sky – 17 July
Find out about the fascinating world of archaeogaming. Join digital archaeologist Dr. Andrew Reinhard (University of York and New York University) on a live-streamed archaeological safari to visit the dusty corners of past human civilizations in video game No Man’s Sky. Watch on Twitch. You can also tour the Mortonia Minecraft server in our other archaeogaming event.

Bristol’s Brilliant Archaeology: Archaeology and the Historic Environment – 13 July
Explore the work of Bristol’s Historic Environment Officer and find out about Know Your Place, an interactive digital mapping resource that lets members of the public explore and contribute to layers of history in counties across South West England. Register now.

This is just a snapshot – there are many more talks and lectures on the festival website!

Have you ever wondered what archaeologists really do?  Do they just dig or are there other aspects to their work?

A Day in Archaeology, delivered in conjunction with the Royal Archaeological Institute, showcases “a day in the life” of archaeologists from all over the UK and this year’s event will be taking place on Monday 13 July 2020. Blog posts are uploaded throughout A Day In Archaeology and stay on the Festival website site all year round to form a developing resource for anyone interested in a career in archaeology or wanting to find out more about the range of opportunities to participate. You even have time to add your own!

The 2020 #AskAnArchaeologist Day will be on Wednesday 15 July 2020 – get your questions ready! #AskAnArchaeologist Day is a chance for people from all over the world to ask archaeologists questions, and an opportunity for archaeologists to share their knowledge. Anyone with access to Twitter can ask a question using the #AskAnArchaeologist hashtag and any archaeologist who has an answer is encouraged to respond. Follow the Ask An Archaeologist Day and CBA Twitter accounts to follow the action.
The Council for British Archaeology will be delivering a series of day long events, including the #YouthTakeover, A Day in ArchaeologyAsk an Archaeologist and our Young Archaeologists’ Day. We will be joined by Professor Carenza Lewis (from Time Team) as part of our ongoing Dig School project, Wessex Archaeology will be delivering our Environmental Archaeology Day with careers advice, skills training and a special YAC 3D handling session. Plus you will have the chance to have your artwork turned into a published comic!

This year we have also joined forces with English Heritage to co-create the youth-focused Festival events, as part of the Shout Out Loud project. They are a major partner in this year’s Digital Festival of Archaeology and will be delivering exciting and creative events for audiences aged 11-25. Shout Out Loud is funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund through its #KicktheDust programme designed to encourage and involve more young people in heritage. Below you can find out more about the project, our partnership and lots of great events aimed at our younger Festival audience.

There’s still time to enter our Festival competitions

Don’t forget to get your entries in for our #RubbishArt and Archaeology Showreel competitions. 

We’ll be sharing a range of entries via our social media channels and there are some great prizes on offer. What are you waiting for – get your entries in now! 

Both of our competitions are open to entrants of all ages. Please make sure you read the terms and conditions before entering, these can be found by following the competition links above.

Festival feedback

We want to know what you think! It’s really important that we give you the opportunity to let us know what you think of the Festival, what you enjoyed the most, what you’d like to see more of and what you think we might be able to do better. This year it’s even more important that we get your opinions as it’s the first time we have hosted a digital Festival. 

You can share your thoughts with us by completing our feedback survey after you have attended an event. 
You can access the survey here.

If you’re an event organiser you can find all of the evaluation information including survey links and some handy guidance notes in the Organiser section of the Festival website.

Support the Festival! 

The CBA is a small charity, reliant on donations and our membership to keep the festival going. We would be delighted if you would support us with a small donation, or even better, consider joining us – you’ll get six issues a year of British Archaeology magazine and access to our full digital archive if you do! Find our how to support us below. Thank you.

Enjoy the Festival! 

We hope you have a fantastic 9 days discovering all the Festival has to offer and we look forward to seeing you at a digital event soon!

The 50th Anniversary of The Vindolanda Trust
Marta Alberti, of The Vindolanda Trust, has written of what is happening at Vindolanda. This well-known Roman site in Northumberland has many national and international connections, as well as the site of many excavations. 2020 is the 50th anniversary of the trust, in what was going to be a year to remember Marta now describes of further happenings as enforced by the changing CV-19 situation. This article was written at the start of lockdown, and like many places there have been changes again since.

Please consider how you can support such appeals and venues if you can, as well as your local groups activities, in the future.

‘On the 1st of April 2020, the Vindolanda Trust celebrated its 50th anniversary. Established in 1970 with the aim to excavate, research and share with the public the Roman remains in its care, the Vindolanda Trust has spent the last 50 years providing opportunities for amateurs and professionals alike to immerse themselves in history and archaeology. Great plans were afoot to celebrate the last 50 years of discoveries, and get ready for the next 50. However, in an unprecedented event, on 20th March 2020 the Vindolanda Trust had to close its doors to both Roman Vindolanda and the Roman Army Museum in response to the fight against COVID-19.

Work continues behind the scenes, to ensure that everyone can virtually enjoy the sites and that the Trust can continue in its mission. For example, new home learning resources have been (and will continue to be) updated on the Trust’s website.  The Trust’s social media presence is stronger than ever, with the Communications’ Manager now living on site, and providing all important gorgeous images. Our new excavation HQ is on site, ready to welcome its first volunteers as soon as it is safe to do so.

But to keep this work going, and to make sure that the Trust are there to welcome you when these testing are times are over, we still need everyone’s help.  ALL the Trust’s operating income comes from admissions to our sites, spend in our shops and cafes and from donations. The majority of that has now stopped: to attempt to compensate for this incredible loss, the Trust have launched a survival appeal, in the form of an unusual, online birthday party. Consider helping by donating the equivalent of a pair of warm socks, or a bunch of flowers, or some fizz.

If you would have visited, please purchase the special edition golden ticket, which celebrates the Trust’s anniversary. This will give you unlimited visiting rights until December 2021!  The Trust, just like the CBA, has long been committed to be at the forefront of research, public engagement and participation in history and archaeology, and looks forward to re-opening its doors to you, and to the world, as soon as possible’.

A West Cumbria Archaeology Society (WCAS) update
Gill Campbell has written an update of a recent Cumbrian activities by the WCAS group. This links into events and projects previously carried out by the group which have featured in our emails to you. She writes;

‘As part of the ongoing Holme Cultram Harbour Lottery Funded project, WCAS organised a weekend of experimental Medieval iron smelting led by Dave Watson from Moor Forge near Wigton. The furnace was built in advance with local clay to give it time to dry out. The charcoal was produced in the Lake District and the iron ore was from Florence Mine, Egremont.

Saturday was a trial run, firing the furnace to make sure all was ok. On Sunday morning Dave lit the furnace and attached a jet of air to bring it up to in excess of 1000°C. Due to a shortage of medieval serfs to pump bellows an adapted vacuum cleaner was used throughout the smelt. Once the furnace was up to temperature it was loaded throughout the day with alternate buckets of charcoal and cups of iron ore – a total of approximately 40 over the duration of the process.

During the day slag was tapped from the bottom to avoid the level getting too high and after 4/5 hours the charcoal level was allowed to drop, the final slag was tapped and the furnace dismantled to reveal the lump of bloom in the bottom. The bloom was removed from the kiln, hammered whilst still malleable to consolidate it and then successfully tested with a magnet to show the iron content.

As a result of the project the Society has a good sized piece of bloom for reference as well as a lot of information about the process which will be very useful as we continue to research the industrial processes that went on in the vicinity of Holme Cultram Abbey. We already have plans drawn up for when we are able to get back in the field!

WCAS would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund for making this experiment possible. Big thanks to Dave Watson for hosting and working so hard to make it successful, Darrell for his advice from the USA as well as Terry, Adam and Pete who helped on the day. For more information about the smelting there is a short YouTube video of the day covering all stages of the project. This can be found here.

CBA National news
2) Recharging British Archaeology: your chance to take part

The CBA has recently secured support from Historic England’s COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund for a project to help rebuild public participation in archaeology as we recover from the effects of the pandemic. Cancelled projects, loss of income, worries about volunteer capacity and the need to plan for different ways of working in future are just some of the problems that groups have faced. There are distinct challenges for those working with children and young people, as well as those with an older membership.


Through this project, the CBA will use its knowledge and skills to support as many organisations as possible to help rebuild public participation in archaeology. We will listen to what organisations need so that we can offer small-scale immediate support and – most importantly –  plan a future programme of activity and funding bids which will enable us to help recharge community archaeology over the coming months and years.

The first step is to start a conversation with local and regional societies and groups, including our YAC branches and member organisations, to find out how you have been affected and what help you would welcome from us.

Please take a few minutes to give us your views by completing our survey here.

There is a separate survey for those involved with YAC Groups here.

Based on these conversations, we will be able to plan some immediate support to help the sector recover. This might include online training, toolkits, mentoring or one-to-one advice sessions. We will finalise the details of this offer based on what you tell us you need.

The insight we gain from these conversations will also enable us to undertake detailed planning work for future CBA projects to extend our Youth Engagement work, develop new forms of volunteering, plan a possible future small grants scheme and improve our digital infrastructure.

At the CBA, we know that we need to change the way we work as an organisation in response to the ongoing crisis. This project will help us ensure that we do this in a way which helps as many organisations as possible offer new and continuing opportunities for people to enjoy archaeology.

CBA North: March News

CBA North News

Dear Members and Friends of CBA North,

This issue’s theme seems to be numbers as you will see for various reasons.

The first two months of the year, even with an extra day last month to play, enjoy and work with, have now gone. There are a number of additions to our previous events listings from three of our group members the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland – the ‘Arch & Arch’, Coquetdale Community Archaeology and the Teesside Archaeological Society. (Other group’s events from outside the CBA North network have also been included). All are now in the revised Events page of our website if they are regular happenings.

March’s events start soon – and hopefully third time lucky for the appearance of Tony Wilmott at the BAS meeting this evening – with Whitby Abbey: 30 years of new research. This event was listed at the start of the year, as it has been previously but those of you in the north of the region will know why the hope as well!

However a pair of articles also review meetings previously announced in the CBA North emails to you last year. This come from Elsa Price, of Tullie House Museum in Carlisle, and Kate Sharpe whose conference we gave a grant to support last year and Maureen Norrie, the Editor of the Teesside Archaeological Society (TAS), who describes the Elgee Memorial Lecture at Middlesbrough. Kira-May Charley who many of you will know already for TAS now become Deputy Chair of the group and represents the group at CBA North Committee as part of the local-regional network also being involved in making this happen.

As part of regional-national network, CBA North is one of a number of CBA regional groups. Indeed we were originally numbered (rather than named) regions across the country. Some of you may remember us as CBA Group 3. Claire Corkill and James Rose, both of CBA National, have written to update of what coming out the 2018 survey and workshops held during March 2019 as well as the preliminary findings from the survey we carried in our last issue – wherein plenty number-crunching has been carried out.

The annual Durham Archaeology Day is close at hand, and details of that day are below. As last year CBA North will have a stall there with Committee members present, so please come along, say “Hello!” and give us your views and feedback on how we are doing for you. (We might even have some bargain books for you for sale there).

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
01.03.2020

2020 Local Society and Group Events – further additions
Some 11 further events have been added since our last email to you in our list of local society and group events, which in turn added to the start of the year listing. These come from a number of sources, including groups inside and outside of the CBA North network.

There are now something like 90 events for 2020 listed. Please continue to let us know any additions and/or alterations for the Events as well as any changes in the details for the Local societies and groups page.

Whilst not all the titles and speakers have been confirmed in these new additions, some have dates that have been confirmed, so put them into your diary now. Here is another consolidated block of those ‘new’ dates, organised by date, which you can also print and ‘patch’ over your earlier printouts.

2 March – Prehistoric Sites nearby Duddo Stones and Roughting Linn, Allan Colman [Bowsden Heritage Group]
14 March – CAREing for rock art in the UK and Ireland, Myra Gisen [ARCH & ARCH]
8 April – AGM and Recent developments in Iron Age archaeology in the North-East, Richard Carlton [TILLVAS]
18 July – Festival of Archaeology lecture: St Godric and Finchale Priory, Margaret Coombes [ARCH & ARCH]
17 September – title to be confirmed on the north east lead industry, Greg Finch [CCA]
26 September – title to be confirmed, Paul Brown [ARCH & ARCH]
29 September – Deceptively Spacious: Durham Castle and the walls survey, Richard Annis [TAS]
10 October – Heritage is more precious than oil: teaching pupils about the past in Jordan, Arwa Badan [ARCH & ARCH]
14 November – Fire, War and Flood: Destruction and Reconstruction of World Heritage Sites, Christopher Doppelhoffer [ARCH & ARCH]
27 October – title and speaker to be confirmed [TAS]
24 November – title and speaker to be confirmed [TAS]

A Note on Further Numbers
Since the start of the year our CBA North numbers of members have continued to grow; some five new members have joined us. Welcome to them one and all of them! At the start of the year the views of our website looked like;

It is therefore pleasing to see that our January and February emails have been well received and that website numbers continue at the same sort of level;

It is with your support that CBA North thrives and is able to support such conferences, and work within the CBA family, as that described below. This is much appreciated by Committee and gives us a purpose for the future.

Can March’s figure be better again? That is also up to you as members, particularly our group members, to help spread the word as we spread your news to everyone else. Already the next email to you is under construction (but whether we send that later this month or the start of April has yet to be decided), so please feel free to send on any news in the meantime.

Northern Prehistory: Connected Communities: a Tullie House conference reviewed
Elsa Price and Kate Sharpe, instigators and co-organisers of the Northern Prehistory conference have given us a review of their wide-ranging conference. CBA North Committee was very pleased to be able to support this conference looking at many different aspects of prehistory of sites, current research on sites and finds, how to research and present it. They write;
 
‘Tullie House’s first in-house conference was held at the museum over the weekend of the 12 and 13 October 2019. This was generously supported with a grant from CBA North and supported with bursaries for students by the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society.


‘As Curator of Human History [Elsa], I teamed up with archaeology researcher, Dr Kate Sharpe from Durham University to try and replicate our own exchange of ideas and perspectives of Cumbrian prehistory on a larger stage. As intended, the conference attracted delegates from across a diverse range of sectors. The 75 attendees represented commercial archaeology units, museums and learning, various heritage sites, academics, students, community archaeology groups and private researchers and amateurs. This bringing together of a wide variety of backgrounds was a key objective of the conference, recognising that multiple organisations, groups and individuals are working in similar areas, yet seldom have the opportunity to share and develop through networking with one another.


A network of museum curators, education officers, CBA North members and others – all conference attendees – listening to interpretation consultant Dot Boughton explain all about the Bewcastle cauldron

‘The keynote presentation was delivered by Professor Richard Bradley of Reading University and the programme included 11 sessions across the weekend including discussions on: what we mean by ‘Northern Prehistory’, material culture, access and engagement, the Langdale axe quarries, and the major site of Stainton West. A conference discussion was led by Paul Frodsham and concluded that there was an active community of people who wanted to do more with both Cumbrian and wider northern prehistory, and are keen to form stronger relationships with other disciplines and organisations. It was also noted that Cumbria should not viewed as “northern” but rather central to the British Isles, and future research work should aim to connect with Yorkshire, southern Scotland and Ireland. Delegates requested that contact details be shared and Tullie House has been compiling a database to help facilitate networking and potentially generate future projects. This contact bank has now been compiled and distributed. Anyone wishes to obtain a copy can do so by emailing me at elsa.price@tulliehouse.org.

A Connected Community of the past; some of Mesolithic Stainton West explained

‘For Tullie House, the permanent Prehistory Gallery had had no major development since its installation in 1991. The recent development of the new displays meant that reconnecting and exploring the findings and ideas from the Cumbrian prehistory community was essential. This ensured that the gallery refresh embraced recent thinking and now better reflects the whole county. The new gallery was part of the focus of this conference, to demonstrate how the results of research and fieldwork can be disseminated to wide audience base. Supporting this central idea were talks from a variety of museum and heritage professionals addressing the challenges of curating prehistory-based school sessions. Papers were presented from Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums (Kathryn Wharton), Leeds Museums and Galleries (Emily Nelson) and Durham University Library and Heritage Collections (Paddy Holland). Alongside this Gabrielle Heffernan, curatorial manager at Tullie House spoke about how best to access and museum’s research collections. Bolstering these talks were practical education-based workshops from Sarah Forster from Tullie House, an optional trip to the prehistoric landscape of Moor Divock led by Emma Watson and a knapping demonstration by James Dilly from Ancient Craft.

Another part of the new displays; with video showing knapping as demonstrated at the conference, original artefacts within the case and handling materials attached to the bench

‘For those working in commercial and academic archaeology the conference provided a valuable opportunity to catch up on work being done across the county, to learn about new approaches and interpretations, and to make both research and business connections in a relaxed environment. The positive messages from national heritage organisations were also well received and will perhaps encourage more fieldwork to investigate the rich array of prehistoric landscapes across the county. The declared intention of Tullie House to foster increased access to collections was also extremely encouraging and will hopefully see both students and more experienced researchers turn their attention to the wealth of Cumbrian artefacts held by the museum.  
 
‘Additional activities included post-conference drinks and a conference dinner. Overall, the conference was extremely well-received with all delegates indicating that they would like to attend similar interdisciplinary events in the future. Feedback also indicated that attendees would have liked more museum gallery time built into the schedule, and that they found the parallel sessions frustrating as they were unable to attend all talks. The closing discussion revealed that almost all audience members would have liked to attend the museum education-based talks, and yet the majority chose the alternative parallel session, perhaps sticking within their own comfort zones. The parallel format was an inevitable compromise used in order to balance the objective of including as many as possible of the wide range of speakers who all submitted high quality papers. Perhaps however, rather than making the sessions thematic in the traditional fashion as we did, we could in future make them truly interdisciplinary. Mixing up sessions might feel a little odd, but our experience suggests that, in terms of improved exchanges between disciplines, the rewards might be significant!’.

Our thanks to Elsa and Kate for this write-up and organising what was a most enjoyable conference – of so many different parts. Of especial note are the follow-up’s to that conference in the networks set up and renewed, they are there to use. (If you have an idea or proposal on what CBA North Committee should give a grant to aid this year, please feel free to get in touch).

The 2019 Elgee Memorial Lecture: Durham and Dunbar
Maureen Norrie, Editor of the Teesside Archaeological Society’s Bulletin, has written to us of another connected community of the past – those soldiers of the Scottish army imprisoned at Durham – and also of a community of the present in how the annual Elgee Memorial Lecture works between a number of local groups. By the kind permission of the Teesside Archaeological Society we reproduce her write-up, which also appears in the current TAS Bulletin, for everyone in the CBA North membership. She writes;

‘This year’s Elgee Memorial Lecture (7 December 2019, Dorman Museum, Middlesbrough) was a ‘flagship’ event for TAS. It was our turn to host it on a once-in-four-years occasion, taking turns to do so with three other local Societies: Cleveland Naturalists Club, Cleveland and Teesside Local History Society, and Cleveland Industrial Archaeology Society. It is co-hosted annually by the Dorman Museum in honour of Frank Elgee (1881-1972) ‘archaeologist, geologist and naturalist, who is probably the best-known Curator of the Dorman Museum and [who] made a lifelong study of the North Yorkshire Moors, including its archaeology’ (Phil Philo, TAS Bulletin 2017, p.22).
 
That’ll be one of them Scottish soldiers, then’. In his talk on ‘Durham and Dunbar, Scottish soldiers at Palace Green’, Richard Annis (Archaeological Services, Durham University) described the unexpected discovery in 2013 of two (partial) mass graves in an overgrown, enclosed, yard on the western side of Palace Green, Durham, during preliminary works for the construction of a Café at Palace Green Library. The bones did indeed prove to be (as a digger-operator predicted) Scottish soldiers: prisoners-of-war from the Battle of Dunbar, 3 September 1650, who survived an eight-day forced march from the battle-site to Durham, only to die in Durham of (mostly) dysentery.


Elgee Memorial Lecture, Dorman Museum 2019. Centre Richard Annis (speaker), Freya Horsfield and Kira-May Charley (Chair and Deputy Chair respectively of TAS, either side of Richard)

‘The talk included not only the dead soldiers, and what forensic investigations could reveal about their lives; but also what could be learned about their surviving comrades, some of whom were transported to America and, after a period of indentured labour, remained there. Full details are included in ‘Lost Lives, New Voices: unlocking the stories of the Scottish soldiers from the Battle of Dunbar 1650’, co-authored by C Gerrard, P Graves, A Millard, R Annis, and A Caffell.

‘The bones were reburied in Elvet Hill Road Cemetery, Durham City, in May 2018, and a permanent headstone installed. There are also plaques to their memory in the site where the bones were discovered; and in Durham Cathedral (their former prison) alongside the altar to Queen Margaret of Scotland, in the Chapel of the Nine Altars’.

The Elgee Memorial Lecture as Maureen indicated also a connected community of groups interested in the varied interests of Frank Elgee. A list of all the previous Elgee Lectures, together with the host organisation, can be found on the TAS website here. Can you fill in the blanks for the missing lectures? Were you there? We are sure that TAS and their partners would welcome that information.

CBA National news;
1) The Birmingham National-Regional CBA Groups meeting

Claire Corkill, Development Manager, has written of what is underway between CBA National and the other Regional CBA Groups. These notes show how your responses from the December 2018 survey and March 2019 are being taken on to help shape both North and National direction for a better future.


Claire writes;
‘CBA North is part of a network of regional groups across England and Wales all working with the shared goal of ‘Archaeology for All’ and helping to create opportunities for more people to get involved with archaeology. Representatives from the CBA and the CBA regional groups met in Birmingham in January to discuss opportunities to work together more closely in the future.

‘Part of the inspiration for this meeting were the outcomes of the CBA’s audience development survey funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund (NLHF) and undertaken by Tricolor 2018-2019. Many thanks to those of you who completed the survey or participated in one of the associated workshops. The survey highlighted the value of the regional groups, and January’s meeting was the first in a number of conversations that aim to develop the relationships between the regional groups and look at ways to improve communications and share ideas and information. Our next meeting of the CBA regional groups is already planned for a Saturday in June.

‘The CBA are currently preparing a further bid to the NLHF and regional group representatives had the opportunity to share their thoughts on elements, such as a possible new CBA website, digital assets and skills development. The development of this work in conjunction with the regional groups will help enable the CBA to provide more beneficial support, creating new opportunities to work together in the future, helping the groups to become more resilient and create more opportunities for members to get involved with archaeology’.

A CBA North’s comment on Claire’s notes is below; 
 
‘We cannot say if many CBA North members took part in the online survey, only you can know if you or group did, however a goodly number did – but we thank you nonetheless. We were especially pleased to act as host for one of the only three on-the-ground workshops in Newcastle last year, and thank those members and friends who attended that event.

‘It is pleasing to see that work from the survey and workshops is being taken on board by CBA National. Many of you have felt that there has not enough prominence and support of the local-regional-national family in evidence over recent years. However, to our mind this work is actively reinvigorating all parts of the family. Your views so far have been carried into the report of the survey, as well as in our representation at Birmingham, and at other meetings, for you. Already the next CBA regional groups meeting is in our diary for June. Your views, comments and feedback are most welcome at any time, useful to us and where possible enacted upon …but we do need them in the first instance.

‘We are looking at a possible April event primarily for our local group members within the CBA North network (perhaps for those groups who are not yet members as well?). This may be on who, how and what and we are currently doing – and importantly what you/they would like to do in the future. We approach the end of our own current five year plan and this, combined with the revitalisation of CBA National, gives a chance to look ahead, perhaps a bit more definitely within that CBA family of local-regional-national groups’.

2) CBA National’s Communication and Participation in Archaeology Survey: some initial results and a thank you!
In our last email to you we also carried the links to a current CBA National survey as pictured below. Thank you to all of those that on contributed to that survey. This very much follows on from the Birmingham meeting described above by Claire.

James Rose, who you will remember is CBA National’s Communications and Marketing Manager, writes of the survey results;

‘The CBA recently ran a survey on communication and participation in archaeology. The aim was to gather evidence that demonstrated whether there was public demand for some of the changes and improvements the CBA would like to make to their website in support of an application to the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

‘Firstly a huge thank you to those that contributed. The response was fantastic! Almost 800 people completed the survey from a cross-section of people with all levels of interest in archaeology. They results show that people are keen for more news and content, information about careers and learning and, crucially, more ways to participate. CBA regional groups are vital to providing those opportunities. These results show what valuable work they do and how much potential there is to grow with local group and individual members. You can view the initial findings on the CBA blog here. A short video lasting a minute has also been prepared giving many of the responses to the survey, many showing the value of archaeology in other ways. This can be found as this YouTube video.

‘If you have any more comments or suggestions, please do get in touch through the links here for CBA National or CBA North‘.

County Durham Archaeology Day: Saturday 21 March 2020
Tracey Donnelly, of the Archaeology Team, Durham County Council, has sent us details of this year’s County Durham Archaeology Day. This year it is slightly later than normal, but nonetheless if you’re interested in archaeology come along and find out more. This year’s fascinating talks will be:

– New Investigations at the East Park Roman Settlement, Sedgefield. Josh Hogue, DigVentures
– Excavation at Binchester Roman Fort 2019. Steve Collison, Northern Archaeological Associates
– The First Ever Excavations at Middleham Castle, Bishop Middleham. Josh Hogue, DigVentures
– Excavations at Walworth Deserted Medieval Village. Richard Carlton, The Archaeological Practice
– Investigations on the North Terrace of Auckland Castle 2019. Jamie Armstrong, Archaeological Services Durham University
– The Discovery of Bek’s Chapel at Auckland Castle. John Castling, The Auckland Project
– The Portable Antiquities Scheme 2019. Benjamin Westwood, Finds Liaison Officer Durham and Tees

The essential details are;

Location: Council Chamber, County Hall, (there is ample free parking at County Hall, and County Hall is well served with public transport. Durham City Park and Ride Scheme buses also stop at County Hall).
Time: 9:50am – 4:00pm. Doors Open at 9:15 AM
Cost: £18.00 which includes buffet lunch, teas & coffees; £14.00 for full-time students, please let us know if you have any dietary requirements, or require a vegetarian lunch.

Tickets sell out very quickly so book early to avoid disappointment.

To book and pay for a place online follow https://doitonline.durham.gov.uk/ and click on ‘More Services’ and select ‘Archaeology Day – Order Tickets’ or contact 03000 260000 if you wish to book and pay over the phone. Please note that requests for tickets to be sent out in the post will incur a £1 postage and packing fee.

There will be displays by local societies and archaeological contractors as well as bookstalls in the adjacent Durham Room. As noted CBA North will be there with a stall, we as CBA North might even have some bargain books for sale there. We cannot promise that they will be those below, but there might be.

CBA North: February news

CBA North News

Dear Members and Friends of CBA North,

The first month of the year, indeed of this decade, has now gone. With February’s start a number of other group start their 2020 programmes – indeed with a meeting tonight at Berwick of the Border Archaeological Society – and there are 12 events that we have now listed in our website’s pages to go with the 70 or so that we sent you earlier.

CBA National have been working hard with the results from the survey carried out at the end of 2018 and workshops across the country – such as we invited you to at Newcastle in March – last year. There is now another survey for how the CBA National website might be changed; your views are important for what you want from us as part of a regional and national family of individuals and groups interested in archaeology, history and heritage. James Rose, from CBA National, explains more below on the survey.

Whilst it was not planned that this issue mainly covers Hadrian’s Wall, it turns out that two of our items this month relate to that monument that almost literally divides out CBA North region in half. This includes the poster for the Hadrian’s Wall Archaeology Forum to come, as well as a chance to revisit (or re-hear?) something heard on the radio last month. Would you like further newsletter emails focussed to a period, topic or theme? Or would you like a mix? Feel free to let us know your thoughts.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
03.02.2020

2020 Local Society and Group Events – new additions
As noted above some 12 further events have been added to our list of local society and group events that we issued at the start of the year – the first of these additions was sent to us by Gill Goodfellow of the West of Cumbria Archaeological Society for their 14 February lecture. Other events, and dates, have come through the course of January for other groups again.

There are now something like 80 events listed. Please continue to let us know any additions and/or alterations for the Events as well as any changes in the details for the Local societies and groups page.

For those that may have printed out a copy of the Events list, here is a consolidated block of those ‘new’ dates, organised by date, which you can also print and ‘patch’ over your earlier printout.

5 February – AGM and presentations [TYNEDALE]
14 February – A Review of Salt-making in Cumberland, Andrew Fielding [WCAS]
22 February – Finding Crin’s Fremlington, Perry Gardner [ARCH & ARCH]
March – date and title to be announced [ARCH & ARCH]
15 April – Patterns of Movement: prehistoric rock art in the Cumbrian fells, Kate Sharpe [NAG]
18 April – Medieval Pottery Project, Tony Metcalfe [ARCH & ARCH]
16 May – Mini study day on Tutankhamun, Penny Wilson [NEAES]
May – AGM, date and title of follow lecture to be announced [ARCH & ARCH]
30 May – The Friendly Desert; Recording the Landscape of the Hatnub Alabaster Quarries, Hannah Pethen [NEAES]
11 July – The Princesses’ Burial; New Research in the Valley of the Kings KV63, Prof Susanne Bickel [NEAES]
18 July – Festival of Archaeology lecture, details to be announced [ARCH & ARCH]
10 October – Function and use of terracotta and other figurines in the Ptolemaic and Roman Periods in Egypt, Ross Thomas [NEAES]

Hadrian’s Wall Archaeology Forum
This year is a leap year – a relatively unusual occurrence, as is the appearance of the Hadrian’s Wall Archaeology Forum in February.

This is the Hadrian’s Wall Archaeology Forum held over from last year. However, as ever, this looks an interesting series of talks dealing with the sites and finds of this well-known monument. The poster includes contacts details and ticket prices – early booking is advised!

CBA National’s Communication and Participation in Archaeology Survey

James Rose, CBA National’s Communications and Marketing Manager, writes to us with details of CBA National’s current survey. He notes;

‘The Council for British Archaeology has ambitious plans to ensure that more people have the opportunity to discover archaeological heritage. As part of this, we are preparing an application to the National Lottery Heritage Fund to enable us to develop new resources and new ways of engaging with people interested in archaeology.

We think a new website with different kinds of content will be an important part of this, but we want to make sure that our plans meet the need of the widest possible audience. We are hoping that, should we receive funding, there will be a real opportunity to give regional groups and their members more ways to communicate and participate.

The survey takes around five minutes to complete, and once you have completed it you have the chance to be entered into a prize draw for a £25 Love2Shop voucher, accepted at over 200,000 high street stores.’

To take part in the survey, please click this link. The survey should only take about five minutes to complete. As ever please feel free to contact CBA North Committee with your views as necessary; our own contact details are unchanged as cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org.

Archaeological and forensic palynology: an interview with Pat Wiltshire
One of the ways we know so much of Hadrian’s Wall is through study of its contemporary landscape, its structures and natural materials utilised (such as the turf wall, as well as raw materials for man and/as well as beast, whether for artefact or not).

As such Hadrian’s Wall briefly featured on The Life Scientific when Pat Wiltshire was interviewed by Jim Al-Khalili on 7 January 2020. In an interesting interview the use of pollen to reconstruct archaeological landscapes was outlined, and latterly its use in criminal investigations, was described.

One of those sites investigated by Wiltshire for archaeological purposes include the well-known Cumbrian fort of Birdoswald for the 1987-92 excavations within the fort, which can be found here. This may not be a listen suitable for everyone (more so especially for the forensic aspects) – it was broadcast after the watershed – but is still available to listen to from the programme’s pages on the BBC Radio 4 website here.

CBA North’s Chair’s New Year Message and 2020 events listing

CBA North’s Chair’s New Year Message

Dear Members and Friends of CBA North,

Happy New Year!

I unexpectedly find myself writing the CBA North New Year Chair’s message to all members this year. This always gives an opportunity to look both back on what has happened and forward to what is to happen. There has been plenty, and there is plenty yet to come as well (see the events listing below). We may be looking and heading in different directions, but if you are reading this email, we are all interested in the history, heritage and archaeology.

Over the past year CBA North membership numbers have continued to grow as now over 210 members, as do our social media followers as well, across (and beyond) the CBA North region. (The number of our group members, however, remains unchanged). For events we have helped fund and further an October regional prehistory conference in Carlisle, had a display stall and books to sell there and in March’s Durham Archaeology Day, as well as hosted a workshop for CBA National’s future strategy in Newcastle. This has been together with bringing you your emails with news, details of new publications (some with special offers), the details of events, exhibitions and more again also from all across (and beyond once again) the CBA North region throughout the year. CBA North remains a regional archaeological group that exists for the region and also as a means to get all news out.

For the ‘what is to come’ 2020 already looks busy with some near 70 events listed below happening all across the CBA North region from our own group members and other groups. These are the events we know about so far – there are others yet to be included – with their varied topics, locations and host groups. If there are any additions or alterations to this listing, or for the details of your own local groups and your representatives to CBA North, please let us know. This is your chance to get your news out and promote it to everyone else of the membership!

The new year sees challenges of course. CBA North is no different from other local groups; our geographical region remains large, our membership is a thin scatter across the region, the archaeological scene is also varied, we hear little of some groups for their news, but there are now so many different websites and social media feeds to keep track of, as well as what the opportunities and challenges are from CBA National’s new strategy for the future. Committee are stretched in time and place, as well as lacking for some sectors of the CBA North archaeological scene overall.


As the above plot shows I think we aren’t doing too badly at the moment, but could be doing better again and regardless of what I think, what do you think?


Like the strands of coloured smoke in this artistic recreation of the lime kilns of the past coming together, CBA North remains committed to being a regional archaeological group guided by the region and its membership of both individuals and groups for the benefit of all. I would urge all of you to be in contact with your group representatives (who will have hopefully circulated this email to you or the link to our Events website page https://wp.me/P45Irp-27), CBA North Committee and/or myself to let us know what you think and get more involved in the group, for example our news does not have to be just for forthcoming events, but also that present or just past.

If you would like to contribute something for the email news or be more involved with the Committee, please feel free to contact me. Our own CBA North contact details at cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org remain unchanged for all comments.

Nevertheless I thank you most sincerely for your support of CBA North during 2019 whether made individually or on behalf of your group; your support makes our work for you all the more appreciated and purposeful. I am sure that you similarly wish to join me in thanking our out-going committee members for their 2019 work. My best wishes to them and all of you as CBA North members for 2020.

Best wishes,

Keith Elliott
Acting CBA North Chair and Secretary/01.01.2020

2020 Local Society and Group Events
Here is a list of all the local society and group events that we know of to date. There are over 70 events included below, but there are some events yet to come. Please let us know any additions for the Events as well as any changes in the details for the Local societies and groups page and for any of your representatives who receive the CBA North emails.

January 2020
6 January – The Glories of the Mine: Whitehaven and Perceptions of Cumbria’s ‘Energy’ Coast in the 1700s, Christopher Donaldson [KENDAL CWAAS]
8 January – William Cowe & Son, the home of the Berwick Cockle, Cameron Robertson [TILLVAS]
9 January – AGM, Member’s Evening and an update on Dig Appleby!, Martin Railton, Trish Shaw, Kevin Mouncey and Sue Thompson [APPLEBY]
13 January – Jet Mines in the North Yorkshire Moors, Chris Twigg [Cleveland Industrial Archaeology Society]
13 January – The Lowick Heritage Trails, John Daniels and Philip Hanson [Lowick Heritage Group]
15 January – The Durham River Wear Assemblage, Gary Bankhead [NAG]
17 January – Carrock Mine; Before, During and After the First World War, Warren Allison [CARLISLE CWAAS]
18 January – Cesspits, Sewers and Sanitation: Waste Treatment in the Medieval Urban Townscape, Don O’Meara [ARCH & ARCH]
25 January – Investigations around rock art panels at Carr Edge Farm, near Fourstones, Hexham, Rock art in context, Ravensheugh Crags and Rock art in the Canary Islands, Andy Curtis, Phil Bowyer and Paul Frodsham respectively [ALTOGETHER]
25 January – Colossal Egyptian Statues, Daniel Elcoat [NEAES]
28 January – AGM and The Auckland Project: Bishop Auckland and excavations at Auckland Castle, John Castling [TAS]
29 January – Anniversary Meeting: John William Chater and the Song of the Carrion Chro [sic]: Satire in mid-Victorian Newcastle, Derek Cutts [SOCANTS]

February 2020
3 February – The King’s High Castle, David Silk [BAS]
3 February – Hadrian’s Wall: Bruce, Clayton, Richardson and the creation of the modern wall, David Breeze [KENDAL CWAAS]
5 February – Old Melrose, Margaret Collin [TILLVAS]
10 February – “Peace, Hoo – Bally Ray”: Low Flying along the Tees from Redcar and Marske Airfields 1909-19, Phil Philo [Cleveland Industrial Archaeology Society]
10 February – Twixt Thistle and Rose: Uncovering Berwick Borough Archives, Linda Bankier [Lowick Heritage Group]
10 February – The North Pennines in the Early Middle Ages, David Petts [LUNESDALE]
11 February – title and speaker to be confirmed [NEWCOMEN]
12 February – Defending Brancepeth, Penny Middleton [NAG]
13 February – A Medieval Bloomery at Loch Awe, Richard McGregor [APPLEBY]
14 February – The Roman Lanes; Excavations in Carlisle, John Zant [CARLISLE CWAAS]
20 February – The 2019 Season at Linbrig, John Nolan [CCA]
22 February – A Grand Tour of Roman Scotland, Andrew Tibbs [ALTOGETHER]
25 February – A Grand Tour of Roman Scotland, Andrew Tibbs [TAS]
26 February – A history of the walled garden at Alnwick Castle, Jenny Proctor [SOCANTS]

March 2020
2 March – Whitby Abbey, Tony Wilmott [BAS]
2 March – Copt Howe: excavating Neolithic rock art in Great Langdale, Aaron Watson [KENDAL CWAAS]
4 March – A Policeman’s Lot, 1750 to 1950, Ian Roberts [TILLVAS]
7 March – A Ptolemaic Lady of Montrose, Espionage and Robert Burns, Daniel Potter [NEAES]
9 March – Cleveland during the Second World War, Stuart McMillan [Cleveland Industrial Archaeology Society]
9 March – Whisky and Gin Smuggling in the Cheviots and Borders, Graeme Watson [Lowick Heritage Group]
9 March – Investigation of the Rusland Charcoal Industry, Rebecca Cadbury-Simmons [LUNESDALE]
11 March – Hidden in Plain Sight – Revealing the forgotten monuments of northern England, Emma Watson [NAG]
12 March – Copt Howe Excavation, Great Langdale, Aaron Watson [APPLEBY]
13 March – St Michael’s Church, Workington: Excavation of an Early Medieval Cemetery, Adam Parsons [CARLISLE CWAAS]
18 March – A road through time – the Archaeology of the A1 upgrade scheme in North Yorkshire, Johnnie Shipley [CCA]
21 March – Technology and home, and Old Melrose, Andy Curtis and Margaret Collin respectively [ALTOGETHER]
25 March – The discovery and excavation of the Roman baths at Wallsend (Segedunum) in 2014-15, Nick Hodgson [SOCANTS]
31 March – Archaeology and the environment on Teesside, Jenny Morrison [TAS]

April 2020
6 April – title to be confirmed, Alison Sheridan [BAS]
6 April – Neighbours and Neighbourhoods 1900-1940, Elizabeth Watson [KENDAL CWAAS]
9 April – The Prehistory of Dumfries and Galloway, Warren Baillie [APPLEBY]
17 April – Henry Hobhouse’s Tour Through Cumbria in 1774, Christopher Donaldson [CARLISLE CWAAS]
20 April – Two Hundred Years of Lowick Lime, 1680s-1890s, Julie Gibbs [Lowick Heritage Group]
20 April – AGM and Review of the High Carlingill Excavations [LUNESDALE]
21 April – Learning through Archaeology: Killingworth ‘Billy’, Michael Bailey and Peter Davidson [NEWCOMEN]
23 April – The Bamburgh Ossuary, Jessica Turner [CCA]
27 April – AGM and Member’s Evening [Cleveland Industrial Archaeology Society]
28 April – Altogether Archaeology, Tony Metcalfe [TAS]
29 April – Landscapes of the Great Depression in the North East, Ronan O’Donnell [SOCANTS]
Date to be announced – AGM [TILLVAS]

May 2020
4 May – The Sound of Early Medieval Music, Graeme Lawson [BAS]
6 May – The Salcombe Shipwreck, Dr Ben Roberts [TILLVAS]
7 May – AGM and the Rev. A Scott of Rothbury, Adam Welfare [CCA]
13 May – Travels in Egypt, Peter Topping [NAG]
26 May – Bronze Age metals and mobility in Northeast England, Ben Roberts [TAS]
27 May – The way of the sword: New insights into Bronze Age fighting practices, Andrea Dolfini [SOCANTS]

June 2020
1 June – Lumps, Bumps & Fairy Tales – the Joys of Field Archaeology, Dugald McInnes [BAS]
3 June – Doon Hill Revisited, Prof Ian Ralston [TILLVAS]
24 June – Putting the prehistory of the Northern Pennines on the map: discoveries made during English Heritage’s Miner-Farmer Landscapes Projects, Alastair Oswald [SOCANTS]
30 June – County Durham: a round-up of recent archaeological work, David Mason [TAS]

July 2020
29 July – The Trench Art Some Crosses of the Durham Light Infantry – a case study in memorialisation, Andrew Marriott [SOCANTS]

August 2020
26 August – Airy citadels, tyrannous cacti, Mycenae’s astonishing stones: Belsay Hall and Sir Charles Monck’s travel diaries, Susanna Phillippo [SOCANTS]

September 2020
7 September – Dere Street – one of the Border Roads, David Jones [BAS]
14 September – A general approach to the Yorkshire Lead Smelting Mills, Richard Lamb [Cleveland Industrial Archaeology Society]
30 September – In defence of Brancepeth: the medieval origins of Brancepeth Castle, Penny Middleton [SOCANTS]

October 2020
5 October – Inscriptions & Sculptures in the Quarries of Hadrian’s Wall, Jon Allison [BAS]
10 October – David Dippie Dixon lectures: titles to be confirmed, Nick Card [CCA]
28 October – ‘The Crack in the Ice’, Women and Property and the making of the Married Woman’s Property Act 1870, Bob Morris [SOCANTS]

November 2020
2 November – Questions of Identity – some recent case studies on the Vikings in Scotland, including the warrior from Auldhame, East Lothian, Caroline Paterson [BAS]
7 November – The Station in The Hills and The Eastern End of the Stanhope and Tyne Railway, Brian Page and Peter Leech respectively [ALTOGETHER]
21 November – Annual Study Day and AGM [NEAES]
25 November – The Geology of Newcastle Cathedral, Derek Teasdale [SOCANTS]

December 2020
7 December – Relics, Sophie Moore [BAS]

Christmas card 2019

CBA North Christmas card
This year’s CBA North Christmas card to our members shows a wintry scene from the north of CBA North-land with the cup-and-ring marked rock at Roughting Linn, hidden away in the woods to north of Wooler, Northumberland.

Rock art motifs can be seen in the foreground as well as the far back edge of the rock in the photograph. The more you look, the more you see – which is like CBA North the more people contribute into the group, the more we can do in the future for you.

We are grateful for your support throughout 2019 and wish you our best wishes for Christmas and the New Year of 2020 – enjoy this festive season as you see fit!

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee,
24.12.2019

Regular 2020 Events – details to come!
We are busy compiling our 2020 list of all regular local societies and groups Events at the moment. If you would like to include your group’s meetings in that – whether your group is in the CBA North network or not. Please send us those details as soon as possible, as well as letting us know of any changes in the details for the Local societies and groups page and for any of your representatives who receive the CBA North emails.

Gardening in Roman Britain and Border Roads Project talks – tonight!

Tonight CBA North’s members have a difficult choice to make; we’ve had short notice of this talk tonight in case you are in the Berwick area…

…but if your interests are more in the hills, however, you might want to get along to the Till Valley Archaeological Society meeting which is on the Border Roads Project, which is at Crookham.

Are these our pre-Christmas choices to be made?

CBA North: October Events

CBA North News
Our CBA North news contains, as ever, a number of notices of events across the CBA North region – but in particular for Cumbria this time. In particular we are especially pleased to send you details of a regional archaeology conference in Carlisle, which your committee has felt privileged to be asked to support and has so agreed to support. We also have a short update on a Cumbrian project previously featured in our emails to you.

In addition our usual listing of events include those to come soon this month. These are from all round the CBA North region. However, also as ever, the sharp-eyed will notice changes on our Events website page (with two slight changes in details and 20 completely new entries), including those of our member groups the Appleby Archaeology Group, Coquetdale Community Archaeology and the Northumberland Archaeological Group.

We hope you that you enjoy these events and that you might contribute something, perhaps of your own local group’s activities this summer?, that you think that others might enjoy or should know of for our next issue.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee,
01.10.2019

Connected Communities: Northern Prehistory Conference: Tickets now available

The rock art motif and landscape of Long Meg, Cumbria, photographed by, and copyright of, Scott Wrigglesworth

Elsa Price, Curator at Tullie House Museum, Carlisle, has written a further piece outlining the conference which we sent in an earlier email to you. She writes of the two day conference;

‘I am pleased to announce that tickets are now available for the Northern Prehistory: Connected Communities conference at Tullie House in partnership with Durham University on the 12th and 13th October.

Professor Richard Bradley of Reading University, author of many articles and books on prehistory, will be delivering a speech on “North by North West: Sharing Problems and Answers” to set the scene for the conference. This weekend will bring together a range of professionals from archaeological units, curators, museum educators, students, academics and community centred groups and explore the interdisciplinary nature of the connections within Northern Prehistory.

The conference will be a great opportunity to discuss how public-facing heritage sites and projects can interact with and utilise archaeological and academic expertise. With the inclusion of Prehistory to the National Curriculum in 2014 both schoolchildren and the wider public are becoming interested in their prehistoric heritage, making this an important time to inspire new research and engagement that will move Northern prehistory into the 21st Century. Additionally the National Lottery and Heritage Fund is also placing greater stress upon the impact upon and diversity of participants and audiences in their sponsored projects, so I hope that this weekend will inspire further projects.

Tickets are £50 and will give delegates access to a full day of talks on Saturday (12th October), a half day of talks on the Sunday (13th of October) morning with an afternoon of interactive sessions and workshops to help develop your own local group projects. Lunch and refreshments, on both days, are included with the ticket fee. Conference tickets also grant attendees free access to the museum for the weekend of the conference.

Tickets are now available through the Tullie House box office. Please call 01228 618700 or visit Eventbrite (for which a small booking fee applies) here.

Bursaries
The Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society will award four Clare Fell Fund Bursaries of up to £150 each to students to attend this conference.

Applications (no need for an application form) should be made direct to the society treasurer Dr W D Shannon at treasurer@cumbriapast.org giving name, address, age, institution attended, course i.e. graduate/post-graduate and any special interests. Applications for one of these bursaries should be made as soon as possible.

Sponsorship
This conference has been kindly sponsored by the Council for British Archaeology North. 

Further Information and Enquiries
Please see the conference programme below. For further information please visit the Tullie House website. For any other enquiries please contact me, Elsa Price, through my own email address here, or my colleague Kate Sharpe through her email address here‘.

The programme
This is a provisional programme and may be subject to change

Day 1: Saturday 12th October
09:30 Registration, Tea and Coffee served in the function room

SESSION 1 (Lecture Theatre): 10:00 – 10:30
10:00 Welcome: Gabrielle Heffernan
10:10 Introduction: Elsa Price and Kate Sharpe
10:30 Keynote: Richard Bradley “North by northwest: sharing problems and asking questions”

11:15-11:30 Short comfort break

SESSION 2: SETTING THE SCENE
Chair: Kate Sharpe
Lecture Theatre: 11:30-12:45
11:30 Something for everyone: Early Prehistory in North West England
Sue Stallibrass, Historic England
11:55 Prehistory in the Lake District: recent discoveries and future research
Eleanor Kingston, LDNPA Archaeology Officer
12:20 Recent landscape studies in Cumbria and the potential for further research
Joel Goodchild, Archaeological Research Services Ltd
12:45 Presenting Prehistory
Elsa Price, Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery
13:10 END

13:10-14:00 Lunch served in function room

SESSION 3A and B (Lecture Theatre + Meeting Room): 13:45-15:15
3B: TRACES of LIFE and DEATH  
Lecture Theatre
Chair: Paul Frodsham
3A: EARLY ENCOUNTERS with PREHISTORY
Meeting Room
Chair: Elsa Price
14:00 Early Neolithic settlement and votive deposition in Cumbria and beyond
David Cockcroft, Robin Holgate and Clive Waddington (Archaeological Research Services Ltd Abstract)
Preparing for Prehistory. Creating a schools engagement programme from scratch
Kathryn Wharton, Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums
14:25 Monumentality, mortality, metalwork and Morecambe
Brendon Wilkins (DigVentures), Stuart Noon (DigVentures), Edward Caswell (Portable Antiquities Scheme), Johanna Ungemach (DigVentures) and Benjamin Roberts (Durham University)
Curating education: A collaborative approach to developing an object-based prehistory offer
Katherine Baxter and Emily Nelson, Leeds Museums and Galleries
14:50 Early Bronze Age burial and funerary practices in Cumbria and beyond
David Cockcroft and Ben Dyson (Archaeological Research Services Ltd Abstract)
Facing the challenge of teaching Key Stage 2 audiences about Prehistory at the Museum
Paddy Holland, Durham University Library and Heritage Collections Learning Team
15:15 Rock art without borders: ‘Cumbrian’ carvings in a wider context
Kate Sharpe, Durham University
Researching Museums Collections
Gabrielle Heffernan, Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery
15:40 END END

15:40-16:10 Tea and coffee served in function room

SESSION 4A and B (Lecture Theatre + Meeting Room): 15:30-17:00 
4A: THE PURSUIT of STUFF
 Lecture Theatre Chair: Elsa Price
4B: THE AXE FACTOR
 Meeting Room Chair: Kate Sharpe
16:10 People and their pots: the Bronze Age pottery of Cumbria
Clara Freer, Exeter University
Searching for hidden treasures: finding and recording Neolithic stone axes in Cumbria
Sally Taylor, Oxford University
16:35 Prehistoric Treasures from Cumbria: Tullie House Museum Acquisitions & Artefacts recorded with the Portable Antiquities Scheme
Dot Boughton, freelance archaeological services
Hansel and Gretel in Neolithic Yorkshire: what might they teach us of the stone axe distribution routes?
David P. Davidson
17:00 Living among the monuments: lithic scatters in the Vale of Eden, Cumbria
Antony Dickson, Annie Hamilton-Gibney and Aaron Watson
“Follow the groove, man.” An exploration of the role of wayfaring and movement in the landscape of the Langdale axe factories, Cumbria
Marnie Calvert, University of Glasgow
17:25 END END

17:30-18:30 Self-guided gallery tour
19:00 Conference dinner. Please either meet in the reception area at 18:30 to walk to the restaurant or meet directly there for dinner at 19:00.

Day 2: Sunday 13th October
10:00 – 10:30 Tea and coffee served in the function room

SESSION 5A and 5B (Lecture Theatre + Meeting Room): 10:00-11:20
5B: MONUMENTAL LANDSCAPES
Meeting Room
Chair: Kate Sharpe
5A: STAINTON
Lecture Theatre
Chair: Gabrielle Heffernan
10:30 Monuments on the mountains: recent fieldwork at boulder-built structures in the Lake District fells
Aaron Watson, Peter Style, Peter Rodgers
Stainton West and beyond
Fraser Brown and Helen Evans, Oxford Archaeology North
10:55 The brilliance of the Shap prehistoric landscape
Emma Watson, Durham University
After CNDR: the bigger Neolithic picture
Helen Evans, Oxford Archaeology North
11:20 Long Meg: at the heart of Neolithic Britain
Paul Frodsham
Social networking in an age without social media. Understanding variation in lithic technology from Late Mesolithic Structures at the site of Stainton West near Carlisle
Robert Rhys Needham, UCLAN
11:45 END END

 
11:45-12:00 Comfort break

SESSION 6 Closing Discussion (Lecture Theatre)
12:00 Closing discussion: The future of northern Prehistory
 Led by Paul Frodsham
12:30 END

 
 12:30-13:30: Lunch served in cafeteria
  

SESSION 7: PREHISTORY IN ACTION
Meeting Room
13:30 Workshop – Tullie House Prehistory Schools Session: A Practical Guide
Sarah Forster, Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery
14:30 Workshop – Axe Knapping
James Dilley, Ancient Craft UK
15:30 Guided Prehistory Gallery Tour
Elsa Price, Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery
16:30 Self-Guided gallery time
17:00 END

Regular October 2019 Events
6 October – James IV Memorial Lecture: In the Land of the Giants – a journey through the Dark Ages, Max Adams [TILLVAS]

7 October – Carpow, Corbridge and Carlisle: Roman armour developments in Northern Britain, Dr Jon Coulson [BAS]
9 October – First Farmers in Neolithic Britain: new methods, new interpretations, Prof Peter Rowley-Conwy [NAG]
10 October – Appleby Moot Hall, Marion Barter [APPLEBY]
12 October – An Introduction to Anglo-Saxon Church Architecture in Stone and Early Vernacular Buildings focusing on Medieval longhouses and their Post-Medieval derivatives, Alan Newham and Martin Roberts respectively [ALTOGETHER]
12 October – Re-opening the Medieval Castle: micro-stories from material culture, Dr Karen Dempsey [ARCH & ARCH]

12 October – My Favourite Things in the Egypt Centre, Carolyn Graves-Brown [NEAES]
13 October – David Dippie Dixon lectures: Exploring an historic townscape and its hinterland: Wallingford from Saxon to late Medieval, and Bell towers: origins, forms and functions, Prof Neil Christie [CCA]
14 October – Binchester Roman Fort, David Mason [LUNESDALE]
29 October – Rock Art of the uKhahlamba-Drakensberg in South Africa, Aron Mazel [TAS]
30 October – The Manorial Documents Register For Northumberland, Sue Wood [SOCANTS]

CBA North: End of August/Start of September news

CBA North News
This issue of CBA North news has been slightly delayed. However, we hope that you find it worth the wait. We have a report of the recent Hadrian’s Wall Pilgrimage, which happens only one every 10 years, and a round-up of recent years by one of our local group members.

In addition the usual listing of events to come with the change in month soon – the sharp-eyed will notice changes to this and our Events website page as we are told of those changes for September and other months, we also have a further article on archaeological creativity and notice of an event from our sister organisation CBA North West.

We hope you that you enjoy and that you might contribute something, perhaps of your own local group’s activities this summer?, that you think that others might enjoy or should know of for our next issue.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee,
25.08.2019

Remaining August 2019 Events
28 August – The Past Beneath the Lawns; current excavations at Auckland Castle, John Castling and Chris Gerrard [SOCANTS]

September 2019 Events
2 September – Whitby Abbey, Tony Wilmott [BAS]
4 September – The Bowl Hole Cemetery at Bamburgh, Graeme Young [TILLVAS]
14 September – Mapping the Khandaq Shapur: One of the Great Barriers of the Ancient World [ARCH & ARCH]
24 September – title to be announced, Dr Ben Roberts [TAS]
25 September – (Re)Discovering Ava: the Achavanich Beaker Burial project, Maya Hoole [SOCANTS]

The 2019 Hadrian’s Wall Pilgrimage – done with stile!
It was rather unkindly and harshly said that we know all we need to of Hadrian’s Wall sometime ago. However excavations, surveys and other researches have continued on and at a pace. Sometimes a stock-take is useful and the Hadrian’s Wall Pilgrimage is one such opportunity. We asked Bill Griffiths to explain all on the pilgrimage, and you will see why there isn’t a typo in the article title. He writes;

‘The first pilgrimage of Hadrian’s Wall took place in 1849, attended by 24 people under the direction of the Reverend Collingwood Bruce. The second pilgrimage occurred in 1886 when it began a decennial tradition. Since 1949 it has taken place in the last year of the decade.

The 14th Pilgrimage took place over 20th to 28th July 2019 and saw 218 Pilgrims, in four coaches, traverse the wall over eight days, looking in particular at some of the new discoveries and research questions of the last 10 years. The Pilgrims came from across the UK and Europe and as far afield as the USA and China.


The 2019 Pilgrims following a lunchtime reception at South Shields Town Hall, who displayed the flags of the majority of nations represented on the Pilgrimage.

Each coach had a pair of guides, each an acknowledged expert on the Wall. Pilgrims were encouraged to change coach each day to get different perspectives from different guides.


Nick Hodgson, President of the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle and one of the coach guides, explaining the fort at Chesters.

Organised by the two learned societies of Hadrian’s Wall, the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne and the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society, the Pilgrimage is five years in the planning. The committee, led by the Chief Pilgrim David Breeze, pores over every detail, from the hotels, to the menus for receptions, to considering whether we will need additional portaloos at key sites.

In the midst of this a handbook has been created for the Pilgrimage, with contributions from experts along the length of the Wall setting out the new advances of the last decade. It has been complied by Dr Rob Collins of Newcastle University and Dr Matt Symonds, editor of Current World Archaeology. Such a volume has been produced for the last three Pilgrimages, beginning with the volume produced in 1999 under Paul Bidwell, and each marks a significant contribution to Hadrian’s Wall studies in its own right. Copies are available from either of the Societies, and can also be found at several of the museum shops along the Wall.


The ‘twin’ compliers of the Pilgrimage handbook Matt and Rob.

The week included on site tours, receptions and walks along sections of the Wall. Much thought goes in to attempting to keep the Pilgrims safe. This year the Pilgrims were granted access to walk a section of the vallum, not usually accessible to the public, between Carrawburgh Roman Fort and Limestone Corner. However, this necessitated getting the Pilgrims across the Military Road at a very fast section of the road. The steering group thought hard about this, with Graeme Stobbs, our lead for Health and Safety, providing the solution. He designed a wooden stile for the event, to get Pilgrims over the field wall opposite Limestone Corner and the two of us, resplendent in hi viz jackets, marshalled the pilgrims to cross the road, with Graeme deploying a green or red flag according to whether the road was clear enough for us to release Pilgrims across it. Anyone who has led a tour knows how hard it is to marshal people to cross roads safely. However, the theatre of the flags worked well, with only a recalcitrant few daring to try and cross under their own initiative! At the end of the day they were all brought across alive – job done.


The Pilgrimage stile, with Graeme Stobbs poised and ready to prevent the Pilgrims throwing themselves in front of cars!

The Pilgrimage is a unique event in every way, not least for the melting pot of people who constitute the Pilgrims, who range from dedicated Wall specialists to curious members of the public who have not visited the frontier before. The discussions held over the week are truly stimulating for all concerned.

So – here’s to the next one in 2029, planning will start in 2024 (gulp!)’.

Bill Griffiths – Pilgrimage Secretary

The Northern Archaeology Group grasps volunteering opportunities
It is a while since we’ve had a local group round-up and heard something from our group member the Northern Archaeology Group, so we asked Phil Carter to review what the group has been up to lately. Here Phil notes how a small group, with its own small projects, has also been engaged with a number of larger ones again. He writes;

‘In addition to our own on-going Roman roads research & fieldwork, and of course our two divers investigating the river crossings and associated votive deposits at Piercebridge, the Northern Archaeology Group also has members who have regularly volunteered on the long-running and prestigious excavations at Vindolanda and Binchester Roman fort sites. They have continued to do that, but with the advent of NLHF funded local community archaeology projects along came the opportunity to look at other, new, initiatives to broaden our field-based experience. Thinking how good that had proved, I thought it might be of interest to CBA North readers to see the extent volunteers from a local group can contribute to archaeological investigations here in the North East of England whilst we aren’t formal group partners in such projects. I have chosen a selection of the community archaeology projects we have worked on in recent years to give you a flavour of what’s out there and what can be achieved.

A few years back a hardy core of us worked on the 3-year Hadrian’s WallQuest community project run by Tyne and Wear Archaeology and Museums. On that we were fortunate enough to excavate on such key sites as the Roman Military Way, vallum & vicus at Benwell, the north defensive ditch of the Wall at Albemarle Barracks and the fort ditch/vicus at Arbeia. We then turned our attention to Wallsend to locate, dig and expose the actual bathhouse remains at Segedunum. And as a final hurrah it was particularly gratifying to re-dig a section of the nearby Wall. It’s fair to say that was a fantastic project to be involved in.

Hadrian’s WallQuest: the (actual) bathhouse remains we helped find at Wallsend.

Following on from that a few of us signed-up to work with the Auckland Castle Trust (now The Auckland Project) community project where with Archaeological Services Durham University (ASDU) we investigated the 18th century walled garden prior to its planned redevelopment. We revealed remains of the early dated pinery & vinery complex created by the Bishops of Durham. It was very different and very interesting. Next we were back at Auckland Castle with a call to excavate an area adjacent to the Scotland Wing in advance of groundworks. ASDU were again the on-site team and supervised the volunteers. We were astonished to find a well-preserved section of the early medieval curtain wall, associated buildings, fine carved window tracery and a Tudor-era kitchen range with three intact hearths. We have since investigated important early chapel remains and more of the curtain wall & service buildings. It’s fair to say we weren’t expecting all of that at all! And continuing work with that Project, this time overseen by Northern Archaeological Associates, we are currently helping to excavate the northeast gate area of Binchester Roman fort, investigating both the early fort rampart there & later fort roadway.


Auckland Castle : a surviving section of the Medieval curtain-wall being revealed.

Closer to home (we are based near Chester-le-Street) something very close to our heart was the Sunderland’s Forgotten Stones community project. The Northern Archaeology Group has long sought to discover Roman Sunderland and we have investigated various sites and evidence for that presence, particularly at Hylton where the Group strongly believe there was some sort of Roman bridge structure in the River Wear. Back in 1999 we published a small booklet and a CD outlining our case and always wanted to undertake some trial trenches there but the opportunity never presented itself. So, it was terrific to learn that Castletown Neighbourhood Action Group was seeking assistance from the then HLF to explore just that. They wanted to investigate the site of where many large ‘briggstones’ were removed from the river bed at Hylton in the 1860s and shipped down to the mouth of the river where a good number can still be seen. Knowing of our keen interest in all this they sought our support from the outset. The project secured the services of Wardell Armstrong to oversee the archaeological investigations. The volunteer workforce did a dig on the river foreshore at South Hylton. This proved challenging as we could only dig at low tide.  We cleaned off a spread of large worked stone blocks & wood, and then put a section through to help establish its construction.  Wardell’s view was that without any material dating evidence, and with a similar build style to a lot of the river quayside, it was probably of 17th or 18th century construction. Later local diver Gary Bankhead was in the water to video some very large worked stone blocks underwater on the river bed close to the opposite bank. They need investigating more. A couple of months later we then moved over to North Hylton to investigate a large parch mark in a pasture field. Excavation found ditches and wall foundations related to a post-medieval farm house. Nothing Roman came to light.


Sunderland’s Forgotten Stones: working on the river foreshore at South Hylton.

Travelling to the south of the region some of us volunteered to help out on the River Tees Re-discovered community archaeology project at two locations. Tees Archaeology were running a dig at Piercebridge village to explore features shown up on a geophysical survey northwest of the roman fort. A number of trenches were opened and investigations concluded they were probably Roman-era trackways. Dalton-on-Tees was the next target, to investigate an extensive earthwork feature that came to light on a Lidar survey. In two trenches the associated ditches of the earthwork were revealed, one having a single piece of Roman mortaria. In a third trench well preserved wall foundations of a Medieval house with evidence of occupation was found sitting on the earthwork mound.


River Tees Rediscovered: wall foundations of a Medieval house come to light.

To summarise; you can see we have been very fortunate to volunteer on a wide range of projects covering different localities and different eras. We have forged valuable relationships with the project leads, the contractor archaeology teams and other volunteer groups. If you want to dig there’s lots out there to get involved in, and CBA North is a great source of information. Local groups and societies don’t have to have their own projects at all’.

Phil Carter, Secretary, Northern Archaeology Group.

Creative Archaeological Continued: Art and Archaeology at Aldborough Roman Town
In one of our earlier emails we had one of our own members describe their creativity inspired by archaeology, and in our earlier emails again Dere Street events and projects have been covered. Rose Ferraby and Rob St. John have combined the two in Soundmarks to find overlaps and resonances between art and archaeology at Aldborough. This is something that is geographically ‘just at the end of the road’, but still running till the end of the month. They write;

‘Beneath the quiet streets and farmland of the North Yorkshire village of Aldborough lies the Roman town of Isurium Brigantum. Recent work by the Aldborough Roman Town Project has revealed that it was a town of great importance in the Roman north; a key trading point and busy hub. It was a busy town with a central forum and basilica, large town houses, warehouses and workshops, an amphitheatre and large suburbs.


Rob and Rose at Aldborough Roman Town, North Yorkshire, pictured by Mario Cruzado.

Visiting Aldborough today, this rich history is not always immediately obvious [as above]. This year, a collaboration spanning art, sound and archaeology has explored and documented Aldborough’s hidden sub-surface landscape, leading to an art exhibition and sound installation and a series of public events in August 2019.


Recording at the Roman amphitheatre above Aldborough, pictured by Mario Cruzado.

Soundmarks is a collaboration between us, funded by Arts Council England. An exhibition of our work will be held at The Shed, Aldborough, between Saturday 24th August and Saturday 31st August.

A free ‘art trail’ will be launched alongside the exhibition, allowing the public to navigate eight ‘soundmark’ sites through the village. Each soundmark is located on an important Roman site – such as the Forum, amphitheatre and river – and will be accessed either using a free interactive mobile app, or using a paper map distributed through the village.


Village Green by Rose Ferraby, Soundmarks 2019.

At each soundmark, visitors can view Rose’s visual work and listen to Rob’s sound work, each interpreting the character and history of the site. The soundmark trail – which takes around an hour to walk in full – is designed to encourage people to explore Aldborough’s unique landscape, and to gain new perspectives on its rich Roman history.

At The Shed, visitors can view Rose’s original visual works and listen to an immersive ambient sound piece created by Rob using the sounds of Aldborough, and produced using compositional cues from archaeological techniques, datasets and maps. Two invited guest speakers – Dr. Lesley McFadyen, an archaeologist from Birkbeck, University of London, and Dr. Jos Smith, an environmental landscape writer from the University of East Anglia – will give talks on Saturday 31st August, alongside an artist Q+A. An artist book documenting the Soundmarks collaboration – containing a download of Rob’s sound installation piece – will be available to purchase’.


This exhibition is funded by the Arts Council with support from the Aldborough Roman Town Project, English Heritage and Friends of Roman Aldborough.

Soundmarks runs to till the 31st August, 10 till 5 during the weekends and Monday, 12 till 5 Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, at The Shed, Aldborough Manor, Aldborough, York, YO51 9EP. Further information on Soundmarks can be found online on their website.

For booking a place at the talks and Q&A during this week, and other further September workshops, these are free but you will need to book a place through the Eventbrite website page here.

Excavating the Steam Engine
Our sister organisation CBA North West have arranged a conference in Bolton, Lancashire. John Roberts, CBA North West’s Membership Secretary, writes;

‘I am very pleased to inform you that CBA North West in partnership with the Association for Industrial Archaeology and the Centre for Applied Archaeology, University of Salford will be hosting the 39th North West Industrial Archaeology Conference on Friday September 27th. The conference is being held at Bolton Museum. As this year is the 200th anniversary of the death of James Watt the theme is excavating the steam engine. With excellent speakers and a tour of Bolton Steam Museum in the afternoon it promises to be a splendid day. There are discounts for CBA North West and Association for Industrial Archaeology members. Please note that lunch is not provided. Details, programme and booking information available at the Eventbrite page here‘.

This conference includes a talk on the Reel Fitz Pit Engine, of Little Clifton (between Workington and Cockermouth for those who don’t know) in Cumbria, where a short-lived Newcomen engine was of around 1780. There were many early engines in the West Cumbria coalfield during the 18th century. This one, however, was excavated in the 1970s. CBA North members with industrial archaeological interests are welcome at this event.

In the future
In our next issue of CBA North news we would like to hear more of what you have been doing over the summer that you think deserves wider coverage. We hope that our next email to you won’t be as delayed as this one and will be out early September.

There are a number of Committee places to fill in the forthcoming year. If you or your local group would like to become more involved in CBA North, please send us an email or feel free to talk to one of the existing committee for more details.

CBA North: July (Festival of Archaeology) special issue

CBA North News
As many of you will know the Festival of Archaeology for this year, till the 28 July, has now started – as has, at times, severe rain showers. Nonetheless across our region are a number of events planned. Indeed one of those events is today. Gillian Waters, the Festival Coordinator at CBA National, explains what is happening nationally below.

This year’s theme is archaeology and technology with some of our own local group members who have organised their own events to coincide with the Festival. Details of those events are given special mention below, but all link into technology – whether of that past or those of the present looking into the past – in some way. Other events, of course, are also happening and Pete Jackson has sent us details of a further event this Saturday. The 2019 Hadrian’s Wall Pilgrimage also starts Saturday, so lots of things happening and across CBA North-land to cater for all tastes.

Best wishes for the summer,

CBA North Committee
17.07.2019

Festival of Archaeology 2019
Gillian, as Festival Coordinator, writes; ‘The Festival of Archaeology is a UK-wide annual two-week event, coordinated by the Council for British Archaeology. It showcases the work of archaeologists and encourages people of all ages and abilities to engage with their own locality and heritage through archaeology. This year’s Festival will take place from 13 to 28 July 2019 and features special events hosted by hundreds of organisations across the UK with hidden sites to explore and new techniques to learn, with talks, tours, workshops, re-enactments, and activities for the archaeologically inclined of all ages.

This year the Council for British Archaeology is also organising on-line festival events – so that no matter where you are you can get involved in the Festival of Archaeology. On 17 July [today!] the CBA partners with the National Trust for #AskanArchaeologist. This live Twitter event gives you the chance to put your question to archaeologists from across the UK. On Youth Takeover Day on 22 July, our band of dedicated volunteers will be masterminding and coordinating the Council for British Archaeology’s social media streams. Volunteers will also be helping behind the scenes on A Day in Archaeology which takes place on the same day. Archaeologists will be showcasing the enormous variety of exciting career and volunteering opportunities that are available, as they post their own blogs and share details of their work.

Find out more details of the Festival on our website https://festival.archaeologyuk.org.

Whatever events you get involved with during the Festival of Archaeology let us know about it via social media with the hashtag #FestivalofArchaeology. You can keep up-to-the-minute with what is happening by keeping an eye to our own social media presences as per below;

Twitter: @archaeologyuk
Facebook: /archaeologyuk
Instagram: @archaeologyuk

To find out more about the work of the Council for British Archaeology visit our website: 
https://new.archaeologyuk.org/. For more information contact the CBA office on 01904 671417 or email festival2019@archaeologyuk.org.

If anyone wants more details that might be unavailable online, please feel free to email Gillian at gillianwaters@archaeologuk.org.

CBA North’s local group members: their own Festival activities
Some of our own local group members are running Festival activities this year across the region. These are by the Appleby Archaeology Group, the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland, as well as the Bamburgh Research Project.

Members who were at our 2016 Corbridge AGM will recall the two presentations following the AGM business by Martin Joyce of the Appleby Archaeology Group and Phil Bowyer of Tynedale Archaeology. Martin outlined the plans for the Dig Appleby project which this year continues in Dig Appleby Digging Deeper at two Medieval burgage plots at the site of the almshouses known as Saint Anne’s Hospital. If you wish to take part in the excavations, you will need to book – but visitors are welcome at any time. Further details can be found here.

Phil, back in 2016, outlined the recent work by his group in the Tynedale area, which has now extended into adjoining Redesdale. The prehistoric site at Rattenraw which the group has surveyed and reported here is now being excavated as part of the Revitalising Redesdale Landscape Partnership; this excavation is also open to volunteers, but again requires booking if you want to be involved. Contact details for this excavation can be found in the Festival’s pages here.

These events are happening next week, but in the meantime there are events this weekend as well. The Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland are holding their monthly lecture looking at more recent investigations of old technology.

Please note that this lecture is not in the usual location where the society holds it meetings, and later than normal also, but will be at Alington House as indicated in the poster above. Directions can be found on the Festival’s website pages here for those unfamiliar with Durham.

Meanwhile the Bamburgh Research Project‘s 2019 season is continuing. During the weekend there are a number of half-day tutorials on environmental archaeology using modern technology to examine the past and its varied technologies. For this you will also need to book; the Saturday is reportedly booking up fast, but in case you are interested there are also Sunday sessions available. Please contact the project through the details of this page if you are interested in taking part.

A new future for mining in the North Pennines?
Also technologically related Pete Jackson has sent us notes of a forthcoming meeting also on Saturday looking to establish another local group in the area. He writes a meeting will be from 1100 to 1430 at the Upper Weardale Town Hall at St Johns Chapel.

‘The purpose of the meeting is to discuss a proposal about setting up a new group for the North Pennines to share information, advice and opinions about the North Pennines mining industries. For this meeting we are defining the North Pennines Orefield as east of the River Eden, south of Hadrian’s Wall, west of the North East Coalfield and north of the Stainmore Pass.

It is proposed that such a group could facilitate the sharing of information within the community of historians, explorers, geologists and archaeologists, to encourage research about the mining industries and provide information to national and local government authorities, as well as land and property owners. This would build on the previous North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty’s Oresome project which the group could continue. You can read more about the proposals at http://northdalemine.uk/2019/04/23/north-pennines-mines-research-group/.

Car parking is available at the east end of the village, adjacent to the Anglican Church, and the bus service 101 runs by Weardale Motor Services from Bishop Auckland railway station. Though hot drinks will be available on the day, you should organise your own lunch. For further details please free to contact me, Pete Jackson, through email or phone 01388 527 532′.

CBA National – a change in address
CBA National have now moved location in York. Rather than being at Bootham, to the north of the minister and beyond the city walls, they are now located on the other side of the river and within the walls. Their address for postal correspondence is now;

CBA National
92 Micklegate
York
YO1 6JX

Other details for email, website and phone details, however, remain unchanged.

CBA National’s Book Sale (continued)

The CBA National book sale as reported in our last issue is, according to the grapevine, now continuing to the end of July. There remain a number of North-land relevant publications which can be bought for a fraction of their original prices. If you haven’t yet had a look, the online shop can be visited here.

CBA North: mid-June newsletter

CBA North News

Our email to you this time is another mixture of content – from a number of sources also – and from around the CBA North region.

Following our usual events listing for the remains of June, we’ve a contribution from a member on how archaeology has inspired their artistic work and studies, something looking ahead to a conference in October (not that we are wishing summer away already), notes on recent publications, posters for events (including one happening on Saturday) and throughout the summer, as well as a book sale. There is so much yet to come in the intervening months, such as July’s Festival of Archaeology no less!

As ever we continue to keep our Events website page up-to-date with details – three further talks have been added, as well as the title of another now confirmed, on that page since our last email to you. Please let us know any additions or alterations to that page or indeed the listing below.

Best wishes,

CBA North Committee
19.06.2019

June and July Events 2019
June 2019
3 June – Gods and heroes: public and private in Pompeian houses, Dr Thea Ravesi [BAS]
5 June – Riding West: Roman Cavalry Tombstones at Hexham & Beyond, Lindsay Allason-Jones [TILLVAS]
25 June – The Yarm Helmet, Chris Caple [TAS]
26 June – Paints and Pigments in the Past: colouring in the Roman Frontiers, Louisa Campbell [SOCANTS]

July 2019
13 July – Work in Thebes, Jose Manuel Galan [NEAES]
20 July – The Archaeology of Domestic Innovation in the Country House, Prof Marilyn Palmer [ARCH & ARCH]
31 July – From Women’s Rights to Human Rights: How the Struggle for the Vote Changed the World, Rosie Serdiville [SOCANTS]

Archaeology, Pots and back again (twice): a member explains all
Lorraine Clay, both a member of Tynedale Archaeology and CBA North groups, as well as potter has sent us this short article on how archaeology inspires her artistic work. She writes;

‘I’m a ceramic artist who draws inspiration from archaeology, this is ponderings on archaeology and pottery.

I’ve always been interested in Archaeology since Dad took us to The Wall when children and finding rock art with Mum as a teenager. When I studied A Level Archaeology in 1990 for something to do after work, I couldn’t have imagined the path that it would take. The A Level was so disorganised that I swore I would never do another qualification and looked for a leisure evening class: woodwork was daytime so I plumped for pottery.

One of my first pieces was directly inspired by Scottish Celtic crosses, then direct influences came from visiting Minoan sites in Greece: these included the 6’ tall storage jars in Malia with coils as thick as an arm, and the curious kernos vessels in Heraklion Museum. You can learn a lot from copying something – such as the challenges the potter faced – one Greek pot I was having trouble with the handles, I put my mind in the place of a hot tired potter who wanted to drink Raki in the shade, and there it was! The simplest and quickest method looked just right.

A Cretan Krater

As I approached 13 years with the Civil Service I took the plunge to devote myself to becoming a full-time potter. I began studies at Newcastle College and for four years sold work in galleries and exhibitions and ran evening classes. In 2006 I commenced the Contemporary Ceramics degree at Newcastle and was accepted to be the pottery tutor for Ashmore House, an NHS mental health daycentre. Newcastle gave me the impetus to be more experimental and I began weathering clay, a technique I still practice today.

Weathering is inspired by mortality: a fingerprint survives on a Minoan storage jar, a Neolithic vessel is patterned with nail impressions but the potter is long gone. A cat’s paw-print on a Roman roof tile…

Like ceramics we believe we are immortal, living for tomorrow we stay in unsatisfying jobs until walking home in a gale a dislodged gargoyle takes us out. (I heard this story many years ago on the radio of a man dying this way after gales in Scotland; googling it now I find a US woman died in 2014 from a falling gargoyle – maybe it’s not rare at all!).

We are more like unfired clay, endangered by random circumstances, wind and rain.  I think this is why I joined Altogether Archaeology: too many years had gone by without digging, I couldn’t resist any more: my knees were in remission. On my first molehill survey I found a jet bead and was hooked again. And it seemed natural to get permission to take a little of the clay we dug up home!

Lorraine at the Whitley Castle mole-hill survey

In 2016 I took a chance and applied to the Ness of Brodgar and was euphoric when I was accepted!

Weathered bowl before firing (above), weathering and wood-fired (below left and right respectively)

Sometimes I use archive materials and clay from archaeological sites. For an exhibition at the Durham Oriental Museum I morphed cuneiform envelopes into curvaceous “promise boxes” using Forest Hall clay following their ancient Middle East counterparts.

For a second exhibition I was delighted with a label just bearing the name Petrie on one vase: I made pieces celebrating the people, including Flinders Petrie, in the chain that had brought the artefact to Durham using clay from digs. William Thacker, who set up the Oriental Museum, is shown by the transfer print which on smoke-fired Low Hauxley clay.


When the daycentre closed it didn’t take long to become bored. I heard you didn’t need an archaeology degree to do an Archaeology postgraduate course, so I contacted Antonia Thomas at UHI (University of the Highlands and Islands), who told me she was starting an Art and Archaeology module the following week!

3 Orkney clays: Back row – unfired with shell: unfired without shell
Front row – fired with shell: unfired without shell.

I enjoyed it so much I applied to UHI and Durham to do an MA in Archaeology, focusing especially on the British Neolithic. Deciding between the two was one of the toughest decisions I’ve had to make! Two terms in and I find myself writing about ceramics not rock art – in Dolni Vestonice, Gravettian finger fluting, materials analysis: before I knew it, I was suggesting Clay in the Palaeolithic for my dissertation! Watch this space!…….’ 

[Many thanks to Lorraine for writing this article; if this has inspired you or you want to share your own archaeological inspiration, perhaps in different ways, please feel free to send us a short article to us at cbanorth@archaeologyuk.org for our next issue].

Tullie House Conference
Elsa Price of Tullie House Museum, Carlisle, and Kate Sharpe of Durham University have sent us the poster below on a busy October weekend they are planning on the prehistory of the Cumbrian area. If you are interested in the day, read on and follow up through the contact details given – contributions from all are most welcome!

(Fairly recent) Tees Archaeology publications
From recent the River Tees Rediscovered Landscape Partnership, Tees Archaeology have fairly recently published a pair of short booklets The First Great Civil War in the Tees Valley and Industry in the Tees Valley. These short well-illustrated freely-available booklets give introductions to the many sites of particular note for their respective subjects.


Whilst many other Civil War battlefields and sieges are known across CBA North’s region, the first of these highlights many of the smaller skirmishes that rarely figure in the national literature. This booklet was written by Robin Daniels and Phil Philo. A further leaflet for the Piercebridge encounter described is also available further down the website page mentioned below.

Industry upon Teesside, however, needs no introduction. However sites familiar and unfamiliar are dealt with in the booklet by Alan Betteney, for the whole variety of Teesside industries, though this is a rather larger file to download. Nevertheless both of these are freely available as downloads from the Tees Archaeology website Downloads page.

TillVAS’ Iron Age Day
Equally industriously in the north of Northumberland, this Saturday sees the Till Valley Archaeology Society hold an Iron Age Day. The poster below gives details of what you can expect, inside and out, at Etal Village Hall to give more of a background and context to their recent excavations at nearby Mardon Farm.

CBA National’s June Booksale
CBA North members might be interested to know that CBA National is having a Spring Sale on publications. They have reduced prices on more than 75 books including many of our recent Research Reports and Practical Handbooks. Their online shop can be visited here. The sale ends on 30 June 2019 so ideal for finding some holiday reading and/or post-exam relaxation.

Prehistoric Pioneers: an Exhibition and Events
Charley Robson, of Durham University’s Prehistoric Pioneers Education and Outreach Team, has written to let us know of this exhibition. She writes;

‘The Prehistoric Pioneers exhibition is now open to the public at the Durham Museum of Archaeology, Palace Green, Durham, until 24 November 2019. The exhibition explores life in ancient Britain, from warfare to rituals, and the way Bronze Age people buried weapons and treasure in hidden hoards. Curated by the Durham’s MA Museum and Artefact Studies students, this exhibition gives a face to prehistoric people and challenges the idea that these were primitive cultures. 
 
To coincide with the exhibition, a pair of talks have been planned to take place on the 20 and 24 June and which are detailed in the poster below. Some more details on these events are given below for those who might be interested to attend. Booking information is given through the poster and places can be booked in emailing archaeology.museum@durham.ac.uk. Further information on the exhibition, including that available who cannot get to Durham themselves, as a series of podcasts is available here‘.